Between 10 and 5 http://10and5.com The South African creative showcase Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:29:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 10 Entertaining TVCs That We’d Happily Watch Repeatedly http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/10-entertaining-tvcs-that-wed-happily-watch-repeatedly/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/10-entertaining-tvcs-that-wed-happily-watch-repeatedly/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:29:48 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86549

10 genuinely entertaining ads from the past year (more or less) that we'd happily watch again, and again. Some of which will hopefully be going home with a bird or few this weekend.

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The Loeries are in town this weekend and what often happens is that the big winners in TV are the big winners in Film Craft are the big winners in Integrated and on it goes. Commercials that once pulled on your heartstrings are rendering you comatose with the haunting opening bars of the score, or if you’re especially lucky the ‘upbeat’ soundtrack to the AV. Causing much concern for the traditionalists of the ad industry and much relief to the consumers of media, modern technology has brought us little gifts like PVR and online TV (and piracy) so we may never have to cross paths with the same ad more times than we’d like. However, there are those rare beasts that just get it right, that or they just have a really good song. In celebration of these genuinely entertaining ads, here are ten from the past year (more or less) that we’d happily watch again, and again, and okay fine again. Some of which will hopefully be going home with a bird or few this weekend.

 

Let us know yours.

 

360eight and Velocity Films for Yellow Pages

 

King James and Velocity Films for Sanlam

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

King James and Velocity Films for Bells

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Ogilvy & Mather Johannesburg and Velocity Films for Cadbury

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

TBWA\Hunt\Lascaris and Egg Films for Standard Bank

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Ogilvy & Mather Johannesburg and Egg Films for KFC

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

OwenKessel and Velocity Films for Amstel

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Ogilvy & Mather Cape Town and Fringe for Halls

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Joe Public, Johannesburg and Bouffant for Lovers Plus

 

King James and Velocity Films for Allan Gray

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

More List Wednesdays!

 

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Levi’s Pioneer Nation | An Interview with Lebogang Rasethaba http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/levis-pioneer-nation-an-interview-with-lebogang-rasethaba/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/levis-pioneer-nation-an-interview-with-lebogang-rasethaba/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:10:53 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86648

Leading up to the Levi's Pioneer Nation festival, we caught up with filmmaker Lebogang Rasethaba about his career highlights and being a pioneer.

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Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (1)

 

Lebogang Rasethaba is a uniquely defined South African filmmaker who not only resonates in creative freedom but in a whole lot of charisma too. He will be one of the modern day Pioneers to engage with the next generation of aspiring creative industry leaders at the Levi’s Pioneer Nation festival, which is happening on the 25th of September in Braamfontein.

 

Instead of waiting around for anyone or anything to realise his goals, from the get go he went out there and did what it is that he wanted to do. A few years later, this now accredited documentary filmmaker’s recent work is headlining articles all over the country!

 

Having worked with filmmakers both locally and internationally, Lebo’s experience in filmmaking extends far and wide and he is able to approach his work with an interesting perspective and chooses to do so with a lot of integrity.

 

Leading up to the Pioneer Nation festival, we spoke to Lebo to find out more about his master craft and to gain some insight as to what being Lebogang Rasethaba is all about.

 

At what age did you consider a career in film making, and how did it all unfold?

 

I don’t think there is a single point; it was more of a long drawn out process. I am naturally creative and super inquisitive, I grew up asking too many questions. I was always writing, drawing, acting as different characters, in university I studied film making as a discipline, I watched lots of films, I wrote about them, I loved them, and then I started making them.

 

Can you highlight some of the milestones in your career that have brought you to where you are today?

 

In university I made a documentary about xenophobia; it was the best film in the class because it was clever and grown up and dealt with real issues. Fast forward a few years and I am China; I made a film about Africans living in China called “Sino”. It might have been the first film with that kind of a perspective, you know, a film about Africans made by an African. That’s my favorite work of all time. Nothing compares. Future Sound of Mzansi and Prisoner 46764: The Untold Legacy Of Andrew Mlangeni, my most recent films that are doing well internationally are just affirmations of years of hard work and personal development.

 

Who are your industry heroes globally, and why do you look up to them?

 

It’s all people I have worked with, good friends of mine who are making waves in their respective creative communities. Jonah Schwartz a New York native based in Tokyo has shot music videos for some of your favorite rappers. He was the first genuine videographer I met. We met in Beijing, he was visiting and I was based there but we were shooting the same, a small documentary about Damon Dash visiting Beijing. His was infinitely better than mine; I learnt so much from him. Rene Eckert is someone else I have worked with who taught me how to tell beautiful stories, deep and culturally astute, digital cinematic mastery. He made one of the most beautiful films I have ever seen with just a 7d and zoom recorder. That’s basically how I made both my films, which are both enjoying some love in the international circuit.

 

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (4)

 

Tell us how you manage to keep motivated when a project does not work out the way you had planned?

 

I watch “Burden of dreams”. It’s a film Les Blank made about Werner Hertzog when he was making Fitzgeraldo. People almost died on set and he persisted. Sometimes I read Gil Scot Heron’s last interview. He talks about how he watches “Rumble in the Bronx” when he feels down and uninspired. Other people’s stories of how they got out their slumps sometimes help me get out of my slumps.

 

What does it mean to you to be a Pioneer?

 

I don’t think I am a pioneer. I think Spike Lee is a pioneer, I think Ousmane Sembene is a pioneer, I think Fela Kuti is a pioneer. To be honest I just work hard and mind my own business. Maybe that’s my thing, I don’t worry what people in my field are doing, so I don’t allow external forces to determine my path. I don’t care who is doing what and why, I don’t compare myself to anything or anyone, I’m really just focused on my own development.

 

What kind of sacrifices do you make in order to meet the clients’ demands?

 

I think the point is that clients, like you and me, have a job. And their job is to sell stuff. And maybe creativity isn’t the thing that always sells products – basic needs sell products; dirty clothes sell washing powder, not necessarily my clever creative ad. Creativity doesn’t create a need, it creates emotions, you see where I am going with this?

 

Do Pioneers have down time, and what do you do in yours?

 

I play golf, I nap, I read, I like to run, I play soccer, I like photos on Instagram, I watch rom coms and cooking shows with my girlfriend, I hang out with friends and family.

 

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (11)

 

In the direction that the SA film industry is heading towards, what is important for aspiring film makers to look out for?

 

Two things – freedom and ownership. 1. If you know someone with a DSLR camera and a computer to edit, you can make a film. Don’t wait for anyone or anything, we live in an era where the means of production are readily available. 2. Keep and archive everything you shoot, it’s a piece of history. I just made a film and I had to buy pieces of our history from British and American photographers, it was so disheartening.

 

Relating to the content of your work, how would you describe your style or aesthetic, and what influences this?

 

My shots are very simple and honest, I exercise restraint when I shoot, I am not trying to trick anyone, it’s about me, a machine and a small slice of reality.

 

If you could make a film with anybody in history, who would it be and why?

 

Wong Kar Wai. He made some of the most beautiful films I have ever seen, flawless storytelling, multiple cinematic glories, caked in layers of emotional complexity, cultural case studies, moments of precise historical incision, a thoroughbred genius.

 

What can we expect from you at the Pioneer Nation festival?

 

Go in with zero expectations, so you won’t be disappointed.

 

What are your plans going forward ?

 

I am just looking forward to sharing Future Sound Of Mzansi with the nation. We have screenings lined up in October so go like our page on Facebook and check out the dates for the screenings. Yes, I just did that.

 

See some of Lebo’s work on his website, and stay up to date with him on Twitter.

 

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (12)

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (2)

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (13)

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (5)

Lebo Rasethaba Levis pioneer nation photographer Matt Mundell (7)

 

This interview was conducted by Matthew Mundell as part of a collaboration between us at 10and5 and the Umuzi Photo Club’s #P50 students, who interviewed and photographed a selection of creatives who will be representing at the upcoming Levi’s Pioneer Nation Festival.

 

Pioneer nation

 

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Look / “Like” / Listen | A List by Onitsuka Tiger’s Motheo Moeng http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/looklikelisten-a-list-by-onitsuka-tigers-motheo-moeng/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/looklikelisten-a-list-by-onitsuka-tigers-motheo-moeng/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:25:13 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86553

  Photographer and cinematographer Motheo Moeng recently teamed up with Onitsuka Tiger to kick off the Joburg version of their global ‘My Town My Tracks’ campaign. In the campaign video he goes around Johannesburg showing off the spaces and places that inspire him. In keeping […]

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Motheo Moeng

Photograph of Motheo by Thato Sehlabela.

 

Photographer and cinematographer Motheo Moeng recently teamed up with Onitsuka Tiger to kick off the Joburg version of their global ‘My Town My Tracks’ campaign. In the campaign video he goes around Johannesburg showing off the spaces and places that inspire him. In keeping with the theme of being inspired, we’ve decided to ask Motheo where he finds inspiration when he’s not out and about shooting in the streets of Jozi. Here’s Motheo list of what and who to read, watch, listen to and follow:

 

Read:

 

The Afropolitan Magazine

 

The Afropolitan Magazine

 

The Afropolitan Magazine is the signature of African sophistication showcasing powerful, thought-provoking, cutting-edge editorial and covering all aspects of today’s rapidly changing life that need to be addressed.

 

The Afropolitan Magazine

The Afropolitan Magazine

 

Read issue 39, visit their website or find them on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

Shots

 

By Daniel Rampula, My Father

By Daniel Rampula, My Father

 

Shots is a showcase for cutting-edge international creativity, publishing only excellent work including the most innovative TV commercials, the latest work from talented new directors as well as ground-breaking music videos, virals, short films and idents. Shots is released seven times a year as a magazine and DVD.

 

See their latest magazines, visit their website and find them on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

The American Society of Cinematographers

 

The American Society of Cinematographers

 

The ASC is not a labor union or guild, but an educational, cultural and professional organization. Membership is extended by invitation to those who are actively engaged as directors of photography and have demonstrated outstanding ability.

 

Read the September issue, visit their website or find them on FacebookTwitter, Vimeo and Youtube.

 

 

Watch:

 

Work by Lebogang Rasethaba, who is currently a director at Egg Films.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

 

Director and filmmaker Thabang Moleya‘s work.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

 

The latest piece by filmmaker Ernest Nkosi, who founded boutique creative company The Monarchy Group.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

 

Listen to:

 

Uno July and Jimmy Flexx from Ill Skillz – a hip-hop duo from Gugulethu, Cape Town known for their electric, raw style of rap and live performance.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Find them on SoundCloud for more.

 

 

Samthing Soweto‘s music.

 

 

 

Everything by Okmalumkoolkat.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

 

Sizwe Moeketsi aka Reason – a Johannesburg-based rapper.

 

 

-

 

Follow:

 

Director and photographer Mark Strydom.

 

Mark Strydom

Mark Strydom

Mark Strydom

Mark Strydom

 

 

Cinematographer and director Bradford Young (USA), particularly his work on Mother Of George and Restless City.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

 

Hardy McQueen and Mandla Mazibuko, founders of STR CRD – an urban youth culture platform.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Check out the STR CRD website or find them on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr.

 

 

Justice, Innocent and Vuyo from I See A Different You – a trio collective from Soweto portraying South Africa as they see it.

 

10409437_449250278544345_6360784403522551578_n

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

See more of their work on their Tumblr and Vimeo and follow them on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

 

 

Prophelaz, formerly known as The Indigenous Dance Academy.

 

Prophelaz

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Keep up with them on Twitter and Facebook.

 

 

Find Motheo on Twitter, Vimeo, Instagram and Tumblr.

 

Find out more about the Onitsuka ‘My Town My Tracks’ campaign.

 

Follow Onitsuka Tiger on their website, Twitter and Facebook.

 

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Levi’s Pioneer Nation feat. Ludwick Marishane of DryBath http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/levis-pioneer-nation-feat-ludwick-marishane-of-drybath/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/levis-pioneer-nation-feat-ludwick-marishane-of-drybath/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:10:41 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86634

With just over a week to go until the festival, the next in the Levi's Pioneer Nation videos is Ludwick Marishane, the businessman behind Headboy Industries and the inventor of DryBath.

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There’s just over 1 week to go until Levi’s Pioneer Nation, a unique 16 hour festival taking place in Braamfontein, Johannesburg on the 25th of September. The line-up features 40 modern Pioneers candidly sharing their engaging backstories, entrepreneurial insights and practical wisdom in 15 minute TedTalk style presentations. Giving us a taste of what’s to come is a series of videos featuring a few of these Pioneers.

 

This video features Ludwick Marishane, the businessman behind his own company, Headboy Industries, and the inventor of DryBath, a revolutionary soap that doesn’t need water. Ludwick is the first African to reach the finals of the Singaore University Global Business Plan competition, a Goldman Saachs intern and the campus ambassador for Google at the University of Cape Town, where he studied business science.

 

It has been no easy feat, Ludwick says, “Since coming up with the formula in the 11th grade, it took me three years to raise enough money, by winning business plan competitions to actually fund the creation of a prototype. The prototype wasn’t perfect, and through the past three years I’ve worked with Dr Hennie du Plessis to improve the formulation and make it the best in the world.”

 

Despite his family and friends laughing at his ideas, no expertise, a lunch-money budget of R50 a week and having to convince the world that their bathing habits were bad for their skins and wasted valuable water, Ludwick graduated from UCT and with R20k in his account decided to work full-time on Headboy Industries. He says, “It’s only after surviving those first six months of 2012 that I truly understood what it takes to hustle. lessons that my four-year business degree never could’ve taught me.”

 

www.pioneernation.biz

 

Ludwick Marishane

Ludwick Marishane

Ludwick Marishane

Ludwick Marishane

 

Look out for some exclusive interviews on 10and5 soon, and find out more about the Pioneer Nation 2014 festival.

 

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Simon and Mary SS15 Collection Shot by Nico Krijno http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/simon-and-mary-ss15-collection-shot-by-nico-krijno/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/17/simon-and-mary-ss15-collection-shot-by-nico-krijno/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:46:20 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86599

  Johannesburg based milliners Simon and Mary have done it again with their new SS15 collection, drawing inspiration from history to pay homage to silhouettes that have stood the test of time. To give things a modern edge, four new […]

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Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (1)

 

Johannesburg based milliners Simon and Mary have done it again with their new SS15 collection, drawing inspiration from history to pay homage to silhouettes that have stood the test of time. To give things a modern edge, four new colourways inspired by clear skies and sunny days have been introduced to the range, and these will also be found in their AW14 collection going forward. “It is an evolution into summer for the felt hat. We needed to find a way to make our hats wearable in summer and believed that adding bright colours to our existing palette would be the answer,” says Dean Pozniak, the driving force behind Simon and Mary.

 

Knowing the collection would need an equally brilliant lookbook to do it justice, Dean enlisted Jana + Koos and Nico Krijno to bring this about. “It’s always a pleasure to work with people you can creatively trust,” he says. When Jana + Koos saw the new range, it was obvious that it was a slight break away from the very classic look of the launch range. “We loved the new colours, and wanted to do something that highlighted the interplay between classic and modern, traditional and fun and even serious and playful – which is very much the culture that we’ve noticed Simon and Mary moving into,” the duo tells us. As long-time admirers of Nico’s work, he immediately came to mind as the best person to photograph the hats in an unexpected way. “Lucky for us he was in Johannesburg following an exhibition, and his wife Mignonne (who is frequently the subject of Nico’s work) was keen to get involved. They shot everything on film, which further pushed the ‘old school meets new hats on the block’ idea.”

 

New releases in the SS15 range include the Mounty, Bowler and Pith Helmet collections, which will be available in November. Though the majority of styles are still made using 100% wool felt, Simon and Mary are now introducing straw for their vintage paisley Panama collection that will be released within the next few days. Other than that, they’ve added a few styles to their Traditional range and currently have Basque Berets available. If you’re anything like us and are just itching to get your hands on one (or a few!) of these beauties, they’re stocked at Prime Store and Palazzo Pitti in Johannesburg and at Krugeh in Pretoria. In Cape Town, you can find Simon and Mary at MeMeMe, Purr, Second Time Around and Smith & Abrahams or you can find them regionally at The Space.

 

www.simonandmary.co.za

 

Lookbook credits:

Concept design and art direction by Jana + Koos

Photography by Mignonne and Nico Krijno

 

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (2)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (3)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (4)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (5)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (7)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (6)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (8)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (9)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (10)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (11)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (12)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (13)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (14)

SS15-LOOKBOOK8

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (17)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (18)

Simon and Mary SS15 Lookbook (19)

 

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Featured: Street Art and Mural Paintings by Mook Lion http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/featured-street-art-and-mural-paintings-by-mook-lion/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/featured-street-art-and-mural-paintings-by-mook-lion/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:00:54 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86469

Mook Lion's distinct works around Durban's inner city have begun to add stimulating perspective to the Durban landscape and creative sphere.

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Mook Lion 3

Mook Lion/Sakhile Mhlongo/Tyran Roy/Sphephelo Mnguni/Kev 7 | Untitled | Photo by Samora Chapman

 

Mook Lion’s distinct works around Durban’s inner city have begun to add stimulating perspective to the Durban landscape and creative sphere. Freshly inspired since producing new works for the recently completed UIA Otherwhere Conference, we caught up with Mook to learn more about his passion for blending street art and high art in the realm of public space.

 

Who is Mook Lion and what inspired you to become an artist?

I’m a Durban surf dog/mural/street/graffiti artist. I come from a family of artists so it’s in my blood. The large quantity of barren walls in Durban also encourages continuing being an artist.

 

What shapes your signature aesthetic?

It’s the use of fine art techniques in the public space. At the moment I am using the linocut mark in most of my work.

 

Have you developed a particular process to your work?

I always try to make sure my artwork in the public space is relevant. I research the site that I am working on to look for inspiration. Then I brainstorm and thought-thunder ideas. I start the technical process by creating my design using fine art techniques. Currently I am using the linocut technique as my prep work. I then attempt to use the linocut mark-making and textures in my mural painting or street art. Finally I interview members of the public and fine art experts as to their reactions to the work.

 

Would you say there is an element of storytelling in street art?

I think there is definitely the potential to tell a story through street art. I have had many big plans but have never really pursued that as a main focus. However there is always a long story behind every work but it may not be clear to the viewer.

 

You’ve got an extensive portfolio of work that can be found all around Durban. How do you select the projects you get involved in?

It’s mostly projects that I have initiated in some way. But in general if it’s happening in the public space I will be keen to get involved.

 

Who are your main influences as an artist?

Faith 47, Banksy, Blu, Jose Clemente Orozco, Jr, Thami Jali and most importantly the artists I work with in Durban who are all my friends!

 

What have been the highlights of your career?

Winning the Back to the City Graffiti Battle 2013 with my crew… Big-Up! Completing the latest mural with my team, it’s the biggest mural we have ever done and was a massive challenge! Seeing my work in the press feels like the work is doing what it is supposed to.

 

There is a school of thought that believes that street art loses its purpose once it is legalized. How does one maintain “edginess” and creativity whilst working within the parameters of the law?

In most cases the work ceases to be considered street art when it is sanctioned, according to my research. It then becomes mural art or public art. As long as you are working illegally there is bound to be some edge to your work. This is the kind of work where you have the most creative freedom. However legal work is also edgy… as long as it is in the public space I feel it has an importance or purpose… even if it is simply beautification/personal intervention.

 

What are you currently working on?

I am currently painting and coordinating three large scale murals just outside the Durban CBD. I am collaborating with 11 other Durban artists. The 1st two murals are complete. The murals are part of the UIA Architecture Otherwhere Conference in Durban and also form part of my Master’s.

 

Outside of painting murals, how else do you enjoy expressing yourself creatively?

Free styling, beat boxing and dancing!

 

Where can we find out more about you?

Check out Mook Lion on Facebook and my blog on Tumblr.

 

Mook Lion 2

Mook Lion/Sakhile Mhlongo/Tyran Roy/Sphephelo Mnguni/Kev 7 | UIA Untitled

Mook Lion/Tyran Roy | UIA Untitled outside KZNSA Art Gallery | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion/Tyran Roy | ‘KZNSA Art Gallery’ UIA Untitled | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion 4

Mook Lion | Florida Rd ‘Durban’s Elephants’ | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion

Mook Lion | Dr Pixley kaSeme ‘Durban’s Elephants’ | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion

Mook Lion/Daniel Mark Nel/Hillcrest Primary Students | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion Mook Lion

Mook Lion 7

Mook Lion | Untitled | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion 6

Mook Lion | Detail of Durban’s Public Artists Mural | Photo by Samora Chapman

Mook Lion 8

Mook Lion | Berea 2 ‘Still Free’ | Photo by: Samora Chapman

Mook Lion

Mook Lion | Untitled | Photo by Samora Chapman

 

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All Fours | A Continuous Illustration Series by Matthew Bradley http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/all-fours-a-continuous-illustration-series-by-matthew-bradley/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/all-fours-a-continuous-illustration-series-by-matthew-bradley/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:00:30 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86506

  In March this year we spotted the beginnings of Matthew Bradley’s ongoing illustration series, All Fours. “It basically started one night while I was watching TV,” he says. “My current studies at UCT haven’t required any illustration so I […]

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'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, A TASTE OF SUMMER

 

In March this year we spotted the beginnings of Matthew Bradley’s ongoing illustration series, All Fours. “It basically started one night while I was watching TV,” he says. “My current studies at UCT haven’t required any illustration so I needed something to keep me going.” He began with the shoe from the DANCE illustration and the final product came together as a rectangle made up of four smaller blocks: two illustrations, a pattern and some type. This became his formula (and explains the name of the project).

 

“Sometimes I start with an illustration and the theme follows. Other times, I will have to go somewhere or do something and decide to make an illustration about it. Having created these “guidelines” makes it easy to start each one and get stuck in. The process of making one block also gives me an idea for the next one,” Matthew explains. “I find I do them mostly when I’m relaxing so I try not to take them too seriously, but as the series continues I want the themes to develop a bit more.”

 

Keep up to date with Matthew on Behance, Twitter, tumblr and Instagram.

 

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, DANCE

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, BEACH

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, SURF & TURF

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, N1

'All Fours'

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, MONOCHROME

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, GAMEBOY

'All Fours'

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, TAN

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, MOTHER'S DAY

'All Fours'

'All Fours'

'All Fours' by Matthew Bradley, WEEKEND

 

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Openings This Week: CT | A Seminar of Creativity, a Facebook Hackathon and Skattie Celebrates http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/openings-this-week-ct-a-seminar-of-creativity-a-facebook-hackathon-and-skattie-celebrates/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/openings-this-week-ct-a-seminar-of-creativity-a-facebook-hackathon-and-skattie-celebrates/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:00:20 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86483

It’s Creative Week in Cape Town and in the lead up to the Loerie Awards this weekend the Mother City hosts the annual DStv Seminar of Creativity, the first ever official Facebook Hackathon on African soil and the Loeries Exhibition. There’s also […]

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It’s Creative Week in Cape Town and in the lead up to the Loerie Awards this weekend the Mother City hosts the annual DStv Seminar of Creativity, the first ever official Facebook Hackathon on African soil and the Loeries Exhibition. There’s also the second Skattie Celebrates event featuring Laura Windvogel, the solo show of the 2013 Lovell Tranyr Art Trophy winner, an exhibition of oil paintings and a showcase of overlooked objects. Here are the details:

 

Wednesday, 17 September

 

Distance, an exhibition of oil paintings by Sarah Biggs and Kirsten Lilford is opening at Salon91.

 

By Sarah Biggs

By Sarah Biggs

Kirsten-Lilford

By Kirsten Lilford

 

91 Kloof Street at 6:30pm.

 

 

Index, a collection of Professor Stephen Inggs’ work is opening at Michaelis Galleries.

 

Index, a collection of Professor Stephen Inggs

 

In the retrospective exhibition, Index, Professor Stephen Inggs presents a survey of his work spanning 25 years – a nexus of an ever expanding anthology of the overlooked, recording that which is inherently transient. Through the development of an ‘archaeographical’ method of unearthing, collecting and photographing found objects, the works on display create associations and traces as indexes and indicators, linking our thoughts about the constructions of the past, in relation to the present. Abstracted, enlarged, and isolated from context, an old telephone, a pair of dress-maker’s shears, a few flowers in a make-shift vase, acquire an aura and presence both as objects of aesthetic attention and as catalysts for re-imagining our own past, or that of a previous generation.

 

Michaelis Galleries, Hidding Hall, Orange Street at 6:30pm.

 

 

The Loeries Exhibition is opening at Cinema Nouveau at the V&A Waterfront.

 

The Loeries Exhibition

 

The Loeries Exhibition showcases the best of all aspects of brand communication – visiting major centres as well as schools and colleges. Marketers, agencies and consumers are afforded the opportunity to view all the winning work, while up-and-coming creatives are given lots of inspiration to produce their own award-winning work.

 

Cinema Nouveau at the V&A Waterfront from 17 – 21 September.

 

 

Thursday, 18 September

 

Facebook Creative Shop Hackathon takes place at the Southern Sun’s The Cullinan Hotel.

 

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Facebook will host its first Creative Shop Hackathon in Africa as part of Creative Week. Designed specifically for young creative designers with one to two years of experience, the workshop offers the opportunity to work on a real creative brief for the Loeries Creative Future Scholarship, with winners announced at the end of the workshop.

 

The Hackathon is limited to 40 participants and will take place from 10am – 4pm at Southern Sun The Cullinan Hotel in Cape Town.

 

Visit the Loeries website for more information and to book.

 

 

Skattie Celebrates: Laura Windvogel takes place at the AVA Gallery.

 

Skattie Celebrates: Laura Windvogel

 

The Skattie Celebrates project carries on the spirit of celebrating young South African creative talent. The editors, who also act as curators, aim to bridge the gap between the industry establishment and the emerging talent on the streets. Following a successful debut in July, Skattie Celebrates turns its gaze on emerging artist Laura Windvogel aka Lady $kollie. The 26 year-old is known to those with their eyes on the streets and ears to the ground as the artist behind the sexually charged watercolours that remove the taboo from the subject of sex. For one night only her work will be on display at the AVA Gallery in Cape Town, as Skattie Celebrates an artist whose work will no doubt find resonance beyond the proverbial white cube that is the art establishment.

 

AVA Gallery, 35 Church Street from 6:30pm.

 

Visit the Facebook event for updates.

 

 

Friday, 19 September

 

The DStv Seminar of Creativity takes place at Cape Town’s City Hall.

 

DStv Seminar of Creativity

 

 

As part of Loeries Creative Week Cape Town, this seminar is a fantastic opportunity for agencies and marketers to hear about the latest trends in brand communication from the Loeries international jury chairmen, as well as other global leaders. Speakers include Patrick Baron, Executive Creative Director of McCann Australia (Melbourne), PJ Pereira, Chief Creative Officer and Co-Founder of Pereira & O’Dell (San Francisco), Rob Newlan, Head of Europe, Middle East and Africa, Facebook Creative Shop, Stephen Doyle, Creative Director of Doyle Partners (New York City) and Yaw Nsarkoh, Managing Director, Unilever (Nigeria).

 

Cape Town’s City Hall, Darling Street. Registration starts at 7am and talks begin at 9am.

 

Visit the Loeries website for more information and to book tickets.

 

 

Saturday, 20 September

 

The Lovell Tranyr Art Trophy presents De(re)tritus by Vivien Kohler, the 2013 winner.

 

Vivien Kohler.

 

“Faith produces work. Love produces labour. Hope produces patience. It is here that I have found the notion of ‘retritus’. It is that Hope, which produces the perseverance to change or transcend the conceptual decay.” – Vivien Kohler

 

The Loft 139 Albert Rd Woodstock at 11am.

 

 

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Openings This Week: JHB | Zines, Performance Art Rap, An Auction, and Danish Cinema http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/openings-this-week-jhb-zines-performance-art-rap-an-auction-and-danish-cinema/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/16/openings-this-week-jhb-zines-performance-art-rap-an-auction-and-danish-cinema/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:00:55 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=86447

This week's art openings and events include an African artists' double-bill, a Jozi zine event, a Wits art auction, new research on residencies, a performance art rap crew, and New Danish Cinema.

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This week’s art openings and events are a mixed bag of all sorts. There’s an African artists’ double-bill at Stevenson, a Jozi zine event hosted by Alphabet Zoo, a Wits art auction, a presentation of new research on arts residencies, a performance art rap crew gig, and the New Danish Cinema fest at The Bioscope.

 

Wednesday 17 September 2014 

 

Open Office by Megan Mace

 

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This event serves as display of process work undertaken whilst in residency at VANSA; engaging in questions that frame notions and aspects of planning towards and participating in an artist residency.

 

VANSA, 1st floor King Kong Building, 6 Verwey Street, New Doornfontein

6pm

More info on the Facebook event page. 

 

 

Thursday 18 September 2014

 

At The Wall by Mame-Diarra Niang & Sepia Rain by Samson Kambalu

 

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A double-bill at Stevenson: The first solo exhibitions at the gallery of French-Ivorian-Senegalese photographer Mame-Diarra Niang, and Samson Kambalu, a Malawi-born artist now based in London. Niang’s work was realised while driving in a taxi through Dakar. The artist did not stop to take the photographs; as such, the images suggest a sense of constant movement. Kambalu’s Sepia Rain is a series of short films, each no more than a minute, shot during his travels in Europe. The films, which he calls ‘Psychogeographical Nyau Cinema’, are based on spontaneous site-specific performances.

 

Stevenson, 62, Juta Street, Braamfontein

6pm

More info on the gallery website. 

 

 

Johannesburg Street by Alphabet Zoo

 

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‘Johannesburg Street’ recreates the city of Johannesburg as one long street through mediums such as printmaking, painting, photography, videography and publications. Alphabet Zoo is a street-culture zine that invites collaboration with young talented artists, illustrators, publishers and designers. By running open silk screen and zine workshops, the Alphabet Zoo duo of Minekulu Ngoyi and Isaac Zavale, Johannesburg-based printmakers, will interact with various public spaces, both in terms of production and exhibiting work. One of the aims of the Alphabet Zoo Research Project is to explore the possibilities of hosting the first Zine Fair or Zine Fest in the city of Johannesburg.

 

GoetheonMain, Arts on Main, Maboneng

6:30pm

More info on the Facebook event page.

 

 

Newwork ’14 Art Auction 

 

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Works on auction will include works by the Wits School of Art staff, Jeremy Wafer, Raimi Gbadamosi, Gabi Ngcobo, Donna Kukama, Dorothee Kreutzveldt, Bettina Malcomess, Walter Oltmann, David Andrew, Ra Hlasane, Natasha Christopher and Zen Marie, among others through a performed auction. As well as works from the fourth year students which will be auctioned through a paper auction.

 

Kalashnikovv Gallery, 153 Smit Street, Braamfontein

6pm

More info on the Facebook event page. 

 

 

Saturday 20 September 2014

 

STΔSH Crew at Popart

 

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The STΔSH Crew can be considered a performance art inspired electro rap crew based in Johannesburg, South Africa. The crew undertakes a satirical approach to exploring South African identity, sexuality, class issues, rainbow nation disillusionment and politics through cutting lyrics, electro beats and a surreal visual statement.

 

Popart, Main Street Life, Maboneng

8pm

More info on the Facebook event page. 

 

 

Also on and worth a watch: 

 

New Danish Cinema Festival at The Bioscope

 

The-Bioscope-New-Danish-Cinema-02

 

The Bioscope and The Embassy of Denmark present an 11 day film festival of the finest contemporary films to have been made in Denmark.

 

More info on The Bioscope website. 

 

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My Day Job: Brenton Maart, Gallery Director of The AVA http://10and5.com/2014/09/15/my-day-job-brenton-maart-gallery-director-of-the-ava/ http://10and5.com/2014/09/15/my-day-job-brenton-maart-gallery-director-of-the-ava/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:00:56 +0000 http://10and5.com/?p=85699

We chat to The AVA gallery director, Brenton Maart about his day job, introducing public programming to the arts and the future of the organisation.

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The AVA Gallery

 

The ‘about’ section on the AVA’s website explains the institution as “Cape Town’s oldest non-profit, members based, public benefit organisation and art gallery, showcasing contemporary South African art in all media.” In partnership with Spier, who own the physical gallery space, the AVA is committed to the promotion and advancement of visual arts, artists, curators and cultural capital in South Africa. This year artist, writer and curator Brenton Maart took the reins as new gallery director. We chatted to him about his multi-faceted day job.

 

Please let us know about your background and how it brought you to your current role at the AVA?

 

I’ve had a bit of a varied background. I work as a curator primarily, for art exhibitions, and I’ve done that for 15 years. I studied photography at the Market Photo Workshop in Joburg and then I worked as the exhibitions curator at the Johannesburg Art Gallery (JAG). Then, I worked as the exhibitions person and curatorial consultant at Freedom Park Trust in Pretoria – a museum built to commemorate the battle against apartheid. After that I worked as curator of the Gauteng Provincial Legislature art collection – for my sins. The space was at the old city hall, and the office was the old bell tower. Then I worked at various museums and galleries, I curated the South African pavilion at the Venice Biennale two years ago, which is probably the biggest project that I’ve done. Then I started working at UCT trying to finish my doctorate in Fine Art. And then I got this job, and here I am now.

 

So basically mine has been a career focussed on curatorial work and almost all of my work thus far has been for non-profit organisations or exhibitions that were not linked to commercial galleries. I’m also on the artistic committee of the National Arts Festival – in Grahamstown – and one of the things we do there is to select annually the Standard Bank Young Artist Award winners.

 

What does the role of curator/gallery director entail?

 

It’s thinking of an idea, finding partners and fundraising, doing media and publicity, designing education programmes for the exhibitions. Doing the logistics and technical management. It’s a whole cross-section of kinds of projects. I’ve worked on historical things, and contemporary art exhibitions, I’ve worked on installations. Other tasks include project management, fundraising, partnerships with government, publications etc.

 

What do you enjoy about the job?

 

One of the very exciting things is that every day is different, every project is different. I have a short attention span, not clinically but self-diagnosed! I couldn’t possibly see myself working in a 9-5 kind of job where every day is the same. I’ve taken the word ‘creativity’ literally, it means kind of to make new stuff all the time. So instead of getting bogged down in the sameness of the day to day of a ‘normal’ job, I’d much prefer to do something where you can make your own work. I see running things and the curating process as creative practice. So you have this idea and then do stuff to make that idea happen. It allows you that freedom to able to think of things and then to realise them. Which I love as a kind of activity.

 

What do you enjoy about working for the AVA specifically?

 

The reason I work at the AVA now is because I think I’ve got more of a feel, more of a bent for non-profit stuff. This is an NGO. Although I appreciate the work of museums, I appreciate the work of commercial galleries in terms of developing the sector and professionalizing the sector, in terms of job creation and that sort of thing, I find that I’m a lot more into things that don’t have commercial imperatives. I’d much rather show work and not have an urgency to sell – on the one hand – and also, I’ve got a very long history of working with NGOs before the Fine Arts sector and a big part of my interest is in public participation and public education. An organisation like the AVA allows that sort of thing. It allows us to use our exhibitions as hooks onto which we hang exciting public programming.

 

Another reason I work here is that this organisation has got major history in South Africa. It’s the oldest non-profit arts organisation in the Western Cape, it’s one of the two oldest non-profits in the country, the other being the KZNSA which was a breakaway from the old apartheid structure of state-funded art organisations. So it’s got a very rich political history, and it still continues today. The kind of stuff that we do is less complacent and more ‘commentary on’. For example during the elections we had Anthea Moys who is a performance artist arm-wrestle members of the political parties. Then the upcoming Zapiro show is a take on political satire in South Africa. So even though I paint this picture of us being grounded in fun, actually the kind of under current is very strongly political, working on the philosophy that arts and culture can be major political tools and tools for change.

 

Every single big name artist has been through this gallery. It’s been traditionally as a kind of stepping stone onto bigger and better things. Kentridge has shown here, Jane Alexander has shown here, Willie Bester has shown here etc etc. You can trace this organisation back to the 1800s. Which is one of the reasons why we’re trying to locate the AVA as a heritage organisation. Not the building itself but the kinds of activities we do are so steeped in history that there’s a cultural living history in that. You feel like you’re part of something that’s bigger that just the here and now.

 

Anthea Moys / A Call To Arms

Anthea Moys / A Call To Arms

 

What do you hope to bring to the organisation?

 

I’ve been here for about 5 months now so my first port of call was looking up the history of the organisation, and seeing what in its history it has done. And a strong thing that came out of there was its pivotal role in public education and public stimulation and the facilitation and support of creativity. So that’s the first thing that I want to focus on, and how we’re going to do that is to move away from this kind of ‘exhibition on the wall’. The first few months that I was here we had exhibitions that were set and they were basically stagnant exhibitions, people would work through the front door and leave in like 2 minutes. And I’d sit there aghast. That led me to the fact that regardless of how fantastic the work is, or how famous the artist is, or whether the artist deserves you spending a day in here as opposed to 2 minutes doesn’t matter, the fact is that you’ve got this stagnant exhibition on the wall. And it’s because – I’m guilty of it as well – we’ve become so used to the visual image.

 

The first thing I want to do is a major shift to increase the public programming. To not have the exhibition as the be-all and end-all of it but to have it as the hook onto which I hang a public educational or interactive programme. For example, we had the Sydelle Willow Smith exhibition a while ago – photographs of convivial relationships between South Africans and foreign nationals. She is a superb photographer but the bottom line is it’s a set of images on the wall, and people are so inundated with photographic imagery that in the greater scheme of things people don’t want to spend a long time looking at that. So what we did with her exhibition was to use it as a hook and we hosted a series of film screenings, theatre performances, we had music, we had a literary event where authors read from their books, and we had a public debate. All things to get people in and get them interacting with the work.

 

Creative Nestlings: Speakers Daniel Ting Chong, Dathini Mzayiya, Celeste Arendse and Jess Cross.

Creative Nestlings: Speakers Daniel Ting Chong, Dathini Mzayiya, Celeste Arendse and Jess Cross.

Artist Swain Hoogervorst opens his solo show

Artist Swain Hoogervorst

Sydelle Willow Smith Photography

Sydelle Willow Smith Photography

Transformations : Panel discussion hosted at The AVA Gallery

Transformations : Panel discussion hosted at The AVA Gallery

The Panel : Nicholas Hlobo, Sanford Biggers, Deb Powell, Mary Sibande, Robert Pruitt

The Panel : Nicholas Hlobo, Sanford Biggers, Deb Powell, Mary Sibande, Robert Pruitt

 

Can you let us know a bit more about the current and upcoming AVA projects?

 

At the moment we’ve got this artist in residency programme, which we started with Jan-Henri Booyens. The idea is to use the three month period of winter – because it’s such a slow time in Cape Town, galleries literally close over that time, so we thought it’d be a good idea to get an artist in to work over that time – an established, mature artist – to use the time as an experiment in collaboration. Jan-Henri is primarily a painter but what he’s doing as part of this resideny is to work with audio and visual digital artists to produce new kinds of avenues.

 

The next exhibition after this is the Zapiro exhibition which is going to be really cool. The one following that is a retrospective of the Hand Spring Puppet Company’s work.

 

Just those three as an example are very different to each other, and not only is the work very different but so is the public programming. For Jan-Henri for example, the public programming is things like studio parties, live art-making. The public programming for the Zapiro exhibition is based on a public paste-up campaign that we’re doing around town. So we’re taking selected works of his and then pasting them up in big scale around Cape Town and around Zapiro Road in Gugs. And then we’re going to have a masterclass for professional satirical graphic artists.

 

The Hand Spring exhibition is going to be fantastic, it’s our big show for the year. It’s a retrospective of their puppets from 6 productions, their notes and studio drawings. We’re working with the international union of puppeteers and they’re doing puppetry workshops and technical workshops – how to make puppets through to kind of conceptualising a play for puppets. Then we’re doing pop-up performances, film screenings. And here the public programming is a lot less didactic and academic and more interactive and fun, getting kids involved, transforming this pedestrian area of Church Street to have weekly puppet shows.

 

Fabricate-a-retrospective-exhibition-by-Handstring-Puppet-Company-81 Fabricate-a-retrospective-exhibition-by-Handstring-Puppet-Company-21

 

What have been, or are going to be, some of the challenges?

 

The most challenging thing is our media, I think. Because I’ve seen what happens around Cape Town and around the world. It’s that people are doing exciting things, the challenge is to get people to come in and participate. We can run the most fantastic programme but if nobody knows about it then it’s a waste of time. So for me the greatest challenge, and I say this because I’m not a media person, the AVA itself is not a media-savvy organisation, is to get people to know about what we’re doing. We’ve got great ideas, great collaborators and supporters, but the key thing for us is to get people to know about it.

 

Because we’re an NGO the other major challenge is organisational sustainability – getting cash to come into the organisation. We can’t do it through the selling of art work – we don’t want to and we can’t compete with commercial galleries. Our philosophy is non-commercial. It’s impossible to rely on public funding, even though we should be able to. So we’re doing fundraising through various ways, we’re going to start a shop that we’re going to run over Christmas, we’ve got this Cameron Platter sweepstakes where you can win a Cameron Platter if you buy a ticket – an old-school raffle kind of thing. And, we’re looking at professionalising our services. We had an auction which was highly successful and now we’re working with an auction house to do an annual auction. What we also want to do is to go back to all those artists, people who have used the AVA as a stepping stone to bigger things internationally and remind them of the pivotal role the AVA has played in their career development and encourage them to give back to the AVA. This is the kind of organisation that should have patrons in the same kind of philanthropical way American arts organisations work.

 

Cameron Platter sweepstakes

 

The AVA is slap-bang in the middle of the First Thursdays district. Have you experienced the impact of this monthly event?

 

I think what Michael Tymbios and Gareth Pearson are doing is fantastic. It seems to be quite a Cape Town thing, where people have an idea and just through their network and co-ordination of that network, build this thing up into this power house, which is amazing. I’ve seen the numbers of people who come through from gallery to gallery on First Thursdays and it’s phenomenal. It’s jam-packed. In terms of getting people through the door and seeing what we do, it’s a fantastic initiative. It’s also super fantastic because it’s angled not so much as a fine art thing, but as a kind of party thing. So it gets people in who wouldn’t ordinarily come to art exhibitions, which is great. We have a whole cross-section of people coming in  – accountants and lawyers and architects over and above the standard crowd we get. We take whatever is happening in the gallery and develop a specific event for First Thursdays.

 

First Thursdays

 

What are some of your plans in the space going forward?

 

We’re in the process of renovating the building – we’re doing a heritage restoration on this building, which is owned by Spier. They bought the building in 1971 and gave it over to the AVA. In the early 1900s it used to be a Gentlemen’s Club. So the idea is to restore the building to its sparkling heritage state and then to introduce contemporary art into it. So you’ve got an old gleaming structure with super contemporary stuff happening inside. We want to take away that notion of art as something you come and look at and instead move towards art as an experience – immersive theatre and installation and that kind of thing.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share?

 

The AVA is a very special little gem in the South African art world, what it needs is to be supported and to be nurtured and to be grown. I think it has the potential to really become a major international player and I think one way to do that would be to stop seeing the AVA as a gallery which is limited by its four walls, but to see it as an organisation which allows us to do programmes beyond the gallery walls. The AVA is an organisation that has a network that extends into the international art world and it’s not just this little space in Church street.

 

www.ava.co.za
The AVA on Facebook
The AVA on Twitter 

 

Sydelle Willow Smith Photography

Sydelle Willow Smith Photography

 

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