Between 10 and 5 The South African creative showcase 2014-09-02T13:09:49Z http://10and5.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Out of Office: Beijing Opera]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85284 2014-09-02T12:33:27Z 2014-09-02T12:33:27Z

Known for their authentic menu and their beautiful interior, Beijing Opera has recently installed wifi - a great excuse to add a favourite to Out of Office.

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Beijing Opera

 

In case you haven’t heard, Beijing Opera is a beautiful eatery in Cape Town serving Yang Zhao’s much talked about dim sum. Known for their authentic menu and their beautiful interior, they’ve recently installed wifi here too – a great excuse to add a favourite onto our list of the best places to work away from work.

 

Yang, the chef and owner behind Beijing Opera, was born in Guangzhou city in China and having spent a lot of time in the kitchen with her grandmother, her cooking is heavily inspired by her Asian roots. Over the past few years she ran a series of popular pop-up restaurants around town. When she was thinking of opening a permanent space earlier this year, she coincidentally found the perfect spot in Rose Street and she jumped at it because the area has such a rich history, the spot was the perfect size and, well, because of its beautiful name.

 

Yang and her close friend Daniel Ting Chong have always been inspired by the aesthetics of the Beijing Opera, so much so that this is what she decided to name her restaurant. Daniel designed the CI for Beijing Opera and Marco Simal designed the interior – he’s the man behind Superette and &Union too. Beijing Opera is made up of large communal tables, because here it’s about sharing space and sharing food - an important part of Asian cuisine and culture. “We try to keep everything as simple and minimal as possible and this is reflected in the aesthetics of the restaurant,” explains Yang and Naama Tsalik, who runs Beijing Opera with Yang.

 

The quiet street, big tables and great food makes this a go-to spot for out-of-office admin or a lunch meeting. When you stop by, don’t leave without trying the Prawn and Chive Steamed Gau, a BBQ Pork Bun and some Potstickers – yes, it’s okay to order more than one thing here. Their tea is all the way from China and exclusive to Beijing Opera. Yang’s father is a tea grower in the Yun’nan Province, West of China. He grows organic high mountain pu’er tea, picked from 150 years old tea trees growing at an altitude of 2500m above sea level, and you can taste it. Yang has also teamed up with Heather Thompson from Soma Confection to create interesting chocolates. Try the dark chocolate slabs with jasmine and sesame or wasabi, ginger and red alaea salt.

 

Visit them at 3 – 9 Rose Street (close to the corner of Strand Street) from Tuesdays to Fridays 10am – 5pm and Saturdays 10am – 3pm. Thursdays they have a Set Menu Dinner Club from 6:30pm – be sure to book at 021 418 1127.

 

They’re planning a new menu, new opening hours and more yum cha (tea). Visit their website or find them on Facebook and Twitter to stay updated.

 

For the September edition of First Thursdays, we’ll be hosting “You Draw Like A Girl!”, a one night only illustration exhibition and print sale featuring 10 local female illustrators, at Beijing Opera.

4 September from 5pm – 10pm.

More info and RSVP on the Facebook event page.

 

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

Beijing Opera

 

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Simphiwe Xulu <![CDATA[Featured: Ink Paintings by Leigh Tuckniss]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85202 2014-09-02T13:09:49Z 2014-09-02T11:00:38Z

A graduate of the Michaelis School of Fine Art, Cape Town based artist Leigh Tuckniss started painting in 2009 and has seen her work go on to investigate themes of mortality, transition, dreams and the unrecognised moments in the busyness of life.

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Leigh Tuckniss

 

A graduate of the Michaelis School of Fine Art, Cape Town based artist Leigh Tuckniss started painting in 2009 and has seen her work go on to investigate themes of mortality, transition, dreams and the unrecognised moments in the busyness of life. Expanding her profile through a growing portfolio of solo and group exhibitions, her most recent exhibition “Limbo” continued her explorations into a place she calls “the space of nowhere”. We caught up with her to learn more about all her latest works, her process and her infatuation with identity.

 

Who is Leigh and what inspired you to become an artist?

 

The name Leigh means ‘dweller of the meadows’, funnily I feel it’s a pretty accurate description of myself and my creative process, I’m a private person whose often in her own world. Creativity started from early on, my parents tell me that I was a child who liked to play imaginary games in the garden for many hours. My mother although she is not herself an artist technically, was the instigator of all the creative explorations we went on. She was forever taking us on outings to see our natural world, I remember for a short while we didn’t have a car and my mom would walk with us to school, stopping to pick up treasures a long the way. Even when we were homeschooled at one point she gave up on our studies and took us to art museums, hiking in the forests, or for a swim in the sea. It was my mother that taught us (my sisters and myself) to not just look at the world around us, but to feel it, to breathe it, hold it, to encapsulate all its worth in a beautiful memory.

 

Growing up, we went to a unique school in Hout Bay where the individual was greatly encouraged to shine out, I don’t remember doing much school work instead I remember being taken on endless nature study walks, being cast into many school plays, I actually just remember singing and dancing and playing up until grade 7! The teachers there were incredibly creative and invested a lot of their own creative journeys into our education. I guess the artist inside was growing from when I was little, and it was greatly encouraged by those that loved me; I know how rare this is.

 

Leigh Tuckniss

Limbo Ink on Canvas 3

Leigh Tuckniss

Limbo Ink on Paper 2

 

What led you to explore and experiment with ink in the manner in which you have?

 

I began painting with ink when I was in my third and fourth year at Michaelis School of Fine Art (2010). I was in a creative rut when I started using the medium, experimenting with it was my go-to when I was at a loss of conceptual thinking. Half the time all I knew was that I just wanted to paint, I didn’t know what it was but I just wanted to do it.

 

As a surprise my mother had bought me a couple of oil painting classes outside of university times, something to keep my spirits up, this was my turning point. Although the classes were extremely technical I found a freedom in them, which was inspiring. Our teacher was a very strict woman but I respected her appreciation for painting. She taught us to honour our tools, our approach and to find a deep spirituality in painting. And this I did. I fell in love with mark making, with brushstrokes, drips, and beautiful painterly mess.

 

The ink paintings flowed on further as a side project, simple process work for my bigger oils. However it was my fourth year lecturer, Virginia MacKenny, she encouraged me to pursue them more. I suppose she could see my freedom in them, the drips that fell, and the marks that moved. There was nothing precious about them as they were just process work at the time, experimentation was fun and easy, as I didn’t know where these small ink paintings were going. To me they were just expressions from my visual journal.

 

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When looking at your approach to work, how important do you think being a storyteller is when you’re an artist?

 

Your point about me being a storyteller is quite an interesting one, I never really thought of myself being one. As out of us three girls growing up I was the last one to give commentary on an event that happened. Coming back from travelling it was always my older sister who could retell the stories and memories as they happened. I have never found it easy to use words to explain things. Therefore to answer your question, yes, being a story teller is very important to me, yet through images not words. I long to capture a moment, a story and a thought in one single expression. I want the viewer to feel the story I am telling, in his or her own words. I’ve wanted my work to connect with its audience the same way poetry does. This is my version of storytelling.

 

How important is drawing from minimalism in your work? Are there any art styles you draw inspiration from?

 

There is a lot to be seen in minimalist art, I suppose that’s why it’s around, sometimes less is more. I enjoy isolating images as it gives the viewer time to appreciate a movement or a subject that they might have, in another context, walked on by without noticing. But painterly wise, I have always adored works by Marlene Dumas, Francis Bacon, Kent Williams, and Cy Twombly, something about their painterly approach hypnotizes me

 

Looking at the style of most of your work, you appear to explore themes of losing control and relating to an almost heightened sense of freedom. Why are such elements so important to you as an artist?

 

Themes of losing control and freedom are what bubbles to the surface, as I don’t always set out with those in mind. I enjoy the feeling I get from particular happenings in life. My main objective when painting is to always pay homage to a moment that is fleeting or less important, a moment which often passes many of us by. The movement of a bird’s wings when landing, or a girl’s hair in water, the pleasantness of the sun-kissed fur of a lazy dog as it sleeps, the gait and a posture of an old woman walking down the road, and the curious sadness of a limp dead frog.  I enjoy these moments, as it relates to how my mother taught us girls to always appreciate our world as it passes. It’s possibly my rebelliousness to the fast pace of modern life!

 

As someone working in the medium of painting, how do you think digital innovations will affect future painters and artists?

 

Sometimes I catch myself thinking, I should have chosen new-media as my major and not painting, as today’s world is so driven by technology it would have been very beneficial! The digital world is expanding so rapidly, opportunities are forever at our fingertips, and the artist of the future is going to be incredibly complex. However, with that being said I am so grateful for my ability to paint, because the tangibility and again spirituality of working with your hands is a huge blessing. It relates to the debate about the book versus reading online. I am a person who enjoys the feeling I get from the pages of a book, I like to pile my books high just as my grandpa did, I appreciate the art that went into making that book. As with painting, nothing beats that smell of oils, or the permanence of ink stains on the table, or the feeling of a fresh piece of paper. I am concerned that the future artists and painters will sacrifice a lot if they lose that beautiful tangibility. Technology in whatever form can remove one from the now, the present moment, you can always click ‘undo’ if you are not happy, but with painting it’s a very different approach. However again the positives of technology are that you can be a very eco- friendly digital artist!

 

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled Ink on Paper 10

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled Ink on Paper

 

What are you currently working on?

 

Currently I am working on some commissions; a couple of paintings and an album cover for musician Greg Abrahams. I love doing these, as I feel honoured when someone chooses me or my style to reflect an idea that they had. It’s a very warm feeling. I’m a bit stuck for a private studio, but our entire house is working out great in the meantime, my boyfriend is a musician so he is always encouraging the creative craziness! We are very blessed with a landlord who allows us to draw on the walls too.

 

Outside of working as an artist, how do you recharge and find some escapism from the art world?

 

Music! I am surrounded by it all the time and I am lucky enough to live with a musician, so music is a blessing for escapism. Other than that my surroundings, living in Muizenberg is amazing, if you’re stuck for creativity one can walk a block down and see an amazing world emerge. I love the ocean, being active, being in the library, or just spending time with my family and friends, these are all my ways to escape and re-energize.

 

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Where can we find more from you?

 

You can find me on Facebook, or through the gallery The Studio Kalk Bay, you can also visit my personal website. I’m not very good at keeping up with my digital portals (this is an area I am working on), but sending me an email will definitely put you in contact with me.

 

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled Ink on Paper 8

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled 6 Ink on Paper

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled Ink on Paper 9

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled 2 Ink on Paper

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled 7 Ink on Paper

Leigh Tuckniss

Untitled Ink on Paper 11

Leigh Tuckniss

Thor Rixon Pentagon

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Presenting: Laura Windvogel aka Lady $kollie at the InAWE Residency]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85260 2014-09-02T10:17:40Z 2014-09-02T10:00:28Z

  Next to join the InAWE Residency is Laura Windvogel, aka Lady $kollie. She’s one of the eight local creatives we’ve invited to spend some time at InAWE Stays while working on a piece inspired by Cape Town during the city’s year as World Design Capital.   […]

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Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Next to join the InAWE Residency is Laura Windvogel, aka Lady $kollie. She’s one of the eight local creatives we’ve invited to spend some time at InAWE Stays while working on a piece inspired by Cape Town during the city’s year as World Design Capital.

 

Born and bred here, Laura has always been fascinated with capturing life in the Mother City through her film photography, which she then translates into what she calls “slightly offensive” watercolour paintings with a sexual undertone. Deviating from her colourful and fruity paintings, Laura worked on an abstract landscape of Cape Town’s city lights during her residency, which was inspired by van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’.

 

See more of Laura’s watercolours and photographs on her Tumblr.

 

Laura Windvogel aka Lady $kollie at the InAWE Residency

Laura Windvogel aka Lady $kollie at the InAWE Residency

Laura Windvogel aka Lady $kollie at the InAWE Residency

Laura Windvogel aka Lady $kollie at the InAWE Residency

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The InAWE Residency our World Design Capital project in collaboration with InAWE Stays and Nokia. Earlier this year Fort RixonLucie de MoyencourtSebastian BorckenhagenDanielle CloughMichael Chandler and Jody Paulsen were at the InAWE Residency.

 

Nokia, a brand synonymous with visual storytelling, provided a Lumia 1520 for the artists at the InAWE Residency to use during their stay. The InAWE Residency videos shot by Josh Hayman were also made possible by Nokia.

 

To book accommodation at the beautiful InAWE Stays, visit their website.

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Openings This Week: CT | Drawing like a Girl, Fringe Art Fair and a Collection of Unpublished News Photographs]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85196 2014-09-02T08:04:15Z 2014-09-02T08:04:15Z

This week's line-up includes an illustration exhibition and print sale titled "You Draw Like A Girl!", a Fringe Art Fair and unpublished news photographs.

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This week Cape Town offers a wide variety of exhibition openings, with everything from our illustration exhibition and print sale titled “You Draw Like A Girl!” to a Fringe Art Fair to an exhibition showing a collection of unseen and unpublished news photographs. Also opening this week are nine solo shows, a group show of ‘masks’ titled Face Value and do it, an interactive group show at Michaelis Galleries. Here are all the details:

 

Wednesday, 3 September

 

I was born yesterday, a new solo exhibition by Michael Taylor is opening at WHATIFTHEWORLD

 

Michael Taylor

 

This new body of work sees the artist returning to the seas, a penchant metaphorical space in which Taylor unleashes his imagined characters. ‘I was born yesterday’ follows the events of stereotyped gentlemen tribes, coming together in a spectacular staged race. An eccentric romp, fictionalising a battle of the male egos and parodying masculine attitudes.

 

1 Argyle Street, Woodstock.

 

See WHATIFTHEWORLD’s website for more information.

 

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Enlighten by Ryan Hewett opens at Barnard Gallery

 

Enlighten by Ryan Hewett

 

Hewett’s new body of work echoes the brutal beauty of his earlier portraits, but displaying a greater fluidity that accompanies his growing confidence in the medium. These works are fewer but larger in scale and they are more intense in their interrogation of self and other. With his densely loaded palette knife, Hewett scrapes and moulds his forms, caressing, bruising and bleeding the canvas, swirling between the associations of figuration one usually makes with portraiture and the sheer expressive energy of mark-making.

 

55 Main Street, Newlands at 6pm.

 

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Thursday, 4 September | First Thursdays

 

“You Draw Like A Girl!”,  an illustration exhibition and print sale at Beijing Opera

 

"You Draw Like A Girl!"

 

The second in our series of affordable art sales featuring a line-up of fantastic female illustrators. The participating artists are Miné Jonker of MUTIAnja VenterElloLady $kollieMaaike BakkerJade KlaraKirsten SimsKarabo MoletsaneSonia Dearling and Nina Torr.

 

Come pick up or order a print – A3 Giclee on Water Colour paper printed at the awesome Orms Print Room – enjoy a Grolsch on the house, and tuck into some Beijing Opera dim sum from a special edition menu, before heading back out on the First Thursdays trail. Cash is king but we’ll have an iPad for EFTs.

 

"You Draw Like A Girl!"

 

Beijing Opera, The State House Building, 3-9 Rose Street, De Waterkant, Cape Town from 5pm – 10pm.

 

See the Facebook event page for more information.

 

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The De Waterkant Fringe Art Fair 2014, presented by CAAM COLLECTIVE, in a secret multi-level gallery hosting a group show each month

 

The De Waterkant Fringe Art Fair 2014

 

The CAAM COLLECTIVE space provides a unique opportunity to artists, collectors and galleries that are invited to showcase their work. The general mode is creative, interactive and conceptually contemporary for likeminded individuals to collaborate on a sophisticated art platform.

 

The show will run on a continual monthly basis with new artist and work being added to the Collective body of art. The September artist line-up includes Mia Chaplin, Michaela Rinaldi, Alwjin Burger, Anton Robert, Kelly John Gough, David Brown, Damien Schumann, Martin Osner, Mr Damage, Kenvin Atkinsonson, Simone Bramati, Krisjan Rossouw, Irina Miccoli, Brendon Bell-Roberts and more.

 

The De Waterkant Fringe Art Fair runs from 4- 30 September 2014 at 30 Hudsons Street (above Origin Coffee). On First Thursdays they are open from 11am – 10pm.

 

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From the absurd to the philosophical, the impossible to the seemingly meaningless, Michaelis Galleries is proud to present do it

 

doit_michaelis_mailer

 

Curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist, do it is an evolving exhibition created from a series of instructions written by artists as diverse as Marina Abramović (USA) and Nicholas Hlobo (South Africa). Today, do it is the widest-reaching and longest running ‘exhibition in progress’ ever to occur, enacted all over the world.

 

 Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 6.22.51 AM

 

Opening at Michaelis Galleries, Michaelis School of Fine Art, Hiddingh Campus, 31 Orange Street at 6pm. Walkabout and Performances from 7pm – 7:30pm.

 

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Face Value, an exhibition of ‘masks’, takes place at Red Bull Studios

 

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Capsule Projects, in association with Red Bull Studios Cape Town and Eristoff Vodka, is pleased to administer a dose of art with twisted ‘face value’ and avant-garde electronic music. This dosage acts to provide overnight relief from the over-familiar tune and to help maintain robust interaction between independent culture-makers. Caution: May only be suitable for purveyors of unconventional cool.

 

Artists include Brett Charles Seiler, Chloe Hugo-Hamman, Crystal Birch, Danielle Clough, Henry Maritz, Katherine-Mary Pichulik, Kim Gush, Lara Klawikowski, Laura Windvogel, Leanie van der Vyver, Lucie de Moyencourt, Nicola Vlok, Rosie Mudge, Stiaan Louw, Zakira Rabaney. Photographer: Kent Andreasen. Live music: Card on Spokes, Fever Trails, JNN KPN. Visuals: Fiancé Knowles.

 

Red Bull Studios at 103 Bree Street, Cape Town at 6pm.

 

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An exhibition of unpublished news photographs is opening at Young Blood

 

Megan Croucamp

Conrad Bornmann

 

News photographers and photojournalists are privileged to witness first-hand the extraordinary people and events that constitute history in the making. But for every image seen by the public, countless others are doomed to obscurity. Whether due to space constraints, editorial style or the particular news agenda, all but a handful of the pictures captured on assignment are destined to remain unseen. This exhibition will give 22 unpublished images taken by talented and renowned South African photojournalists their deserved prominence and celebrate the unique stories behind them.

 

Young Blood, Beautifull Life Building, 70 -72 Bree Street, Cape Town.

 

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Four exhibitions are opening at Brundyn+

 

Pause by Emma Nourse is opening in Room 1

 

Pause by Emma Nourse

 

Pause continues Emma’s preoccupation with representations of environmental entropy and the deepening influence of human interference. The works on exhibition poignantly depict crumbling glaciers and melting ice sheets in stages of depletion. Though this body of work illustrates the fragility and vulnerability of our natural environment, it also pays homage to its awe-inspiring strength and enduring will.

 

Open by Chris van Eeden is opening in Room 2

 

Open by Chris van Eeden

 

Open is an exhibition of new paintings, sculpture, video, found objects and things on top of other things by Chris van Eeden. 

 

Points et Itinéraires by Sudy Diallo is opening in Room 3

 

Points et Itinéraires by Sudy Diallo

 

Points et Itinéraires (meaning Points and Itineraries in English), alludes to movements to different parts of the world, continent, country or landscape and the activities that one engages in when in those spaces. The exhibition is an extension of key ideas that Diallo has explored in the past couple of years. Among these are his fascination with the future of Africa and how it has been impacted on by global politics and economics.

 

Phyllis by Zina Saro Wiwa is opening in the Video Room

 

Phyllis by Zina Saro Wiwa

 

Phyllis is a moving and atmospheric portrait of a ‘psychic’ vampire, a woman obsessed with synthetic Nollywood dramas, that lives alone in Lagos, Nigeria. The central idea of this short experimental film is the practise and significance of wig-wearing in Nollywood film; a practise the director has invested with deeper psychological as well as science-fiction layers. Underpinning this central idea however is a critique of the unforgiving treatment of single women in Nollywood and Nigeria.

 

170 Buitengracht Street, Cape Town from 6pm – 9pm.

 

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Two exhibitions are opening at StateoftheART

 

Tell Me A Story by Mila Posthumus

 

Early call 1000mm x 850mm

 

There is a sense, in this collection, of having stumbled upon a private moment. The moments captured are small and unposed, the subjects caught up in their own thoughts; distracted.  Although they are often painted looking directly at the viewer, drawing him in, there is detachment from the viewer; lending the work a voyeuristic quality. What is seen unmistakably forms part of a larger narrative and the subject’s distraction opens up a space for the viewer to fill and weave a story of his/her own.

 

Contra Natura by Werner Ungerer

 

Contra Natura

 

This work consists of 18 loose sheets of calligraphy and text, contained in clamp-shell box. Contra Natura [“against nature”] is a short story hand-illuminated in a medieval calligraphic hand “gothic textura quadrata”. The digital and the archaic worked hand in hand in the production of this work which took Ungerer two years to complete.

 

61 Shortmarket Street form 5pm.

 

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Persephone’s Garden, a solo exhibition of work by Judy Woodborne is opening at The Cape Gallery

 

Persephone's Garden

 

Judy Woodborne began working on a series of oil paintings and prints that were inspired by the elements of earth, fire, air and water a number of years ago. Persephone’s Garden is an extension of this series, based on the element of water. To her, these paintings represent a visual mediation, a restful moment of contemplation and tranquillity.

 

60 Church Street from 5:30pm.

 

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Layla Leiman <![CDATA[Openings This Week: JHB | A solo show, three group exhibitions and 30 years of Shifty Records]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85158 2014-09-02T07:47:44Z 2014-09-02T07:47:44Z

This week's art openings and events include a print solo show, three group exhibitions, Dance Umbrella continues and Shifty September launches - a month-long celebration of 30 years of seditious sounds and Shifty Records.

The post Openings This Week: JHB | A solo show, three group exhibitions and 30 years of Shifty Records appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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This week’s art openings and events include a solo show at NIROXprojects, three group exhibitions respectively exploring materiality, collaboration, and the politics and poets of space. Dance Umbrella continues and Shifty September launches, a month-long celebration of 30 years of seditious sounds and Shifty Records.

 

Thursday 4 September 2014

 

Vestige, a solo exhibition by Bevan de Wet

 

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This new body of work is comprised of a collection of etchings, which explores the fragmentation of memory, nostalgia and cultural identity. De Wet’s interest in how history is chronicled in museums has lead him to explore different ways of viewing, interrogating the emphasis on aesthetic juxtaposition rather than ostensible understanding. 

 

NIROXprojects, 264 Fox Street, Arts on Main, Maboneng

6pm

More info on the Facebook event page.

 

 

Materiality, a four person exhibition by Dirk Bahmann, Mandy Coppes-Martin, Stephan Erasmus and Mandy Johnston

 

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The four artists participating in this exhibition show a common interest in materiality and especially in concepts and values attributed to materials. Materiality particularly explores the use of alternative mediums for art-making purposes, ranging from intricate silk drawings, copper wire, coal, wood, fabric and mild steel sculpture.

 

Lizamore & Associates, 155 Jan Smuts Avenue, Parkwood

6pm

More info on the Facebook event page. 

 

 

Sunday 7 September 2014

 

Degrees of Separation, a group show curated by Assemblage

 

 

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Degrees of Separation, a collaborative and process-driven group exhibition by Assemblage, aims to respond to and interrogate the observation that artists don’t look enough at each others’ work, and to encourage conversation, collaboration and peer review amongst the invited exhibiting artists. Assemblage is interested in sharing, connecting and creating amongst artists. Through a series of peer mentoring workshops leading up to the exhibition, the artists spent six months looking directly at, interrogating and responding to one another’s practice and artworks.

 

Absa Art Gallery, 161 Main Street, Joburg

11am

more info on the Facebook event page. 

 

 

Also on and worth a look: 

 

Peregrinate: Field Notes on Time Travel and Space, an exhibition by South Africans Thabiso Sekgala and Musa Nxumalo, and Kenyan Mimi Cherono Ng’ok

 

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Traversing Soweto streets, backyards in Nairobi, dusty Jordanian alleys, Peregrinate invites viewers to consider the intimate politics of home and belonging, as well as the possibilities inherent in dislocation, or a lack of anchoring, and the routes one takes to find a way. Sub-titled ‘field notes on time travel and space’, the exhibition examines notions of spatial politics, the economics of time and travel, and the kinds of access granted to travellers. 

 

The Goethe-Insitut, 119 Jan Smuts Avenue Parkwood

Daily until 19th September.

More info on the Goethe website.

 

 

Shifty September: Celebrating 30 years of seditious sounds

 

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Shifty Records, the Alliance Française of Johannesburg and the South African History Archive (SAHA) are pleased to present SHIFTY SEPTEMBER. Celebrating the 30 years of seditious sounds, this Heritage Month tribute to the Shifty Records music label will be a combination of exhibitions, documentary screenings, panel discussions and, of course, concerts to celebrate the Shifty story of musical activism in the struggle for democracy in South Africa.

 

More info on Twitter, Facebook and full programme of events online. 

 

 

Dance Umbrella 

 

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A week of the very best contemporary dance works featuring local choreographers Gregory Maqoma, in collaboration with the Spanish choreographer Roberto Olivan, Luyanda Sidiya and Thabo Rapoo. The renowned actress/playwright Sylvaine Strike in collaboration with PJ Sabbagha and the Forgotten Angle Dance Company, the South African choreographer, and now Brussels resident, Moya Michael collaborating with Igor Shyshko and the internationally renowned French choreographerAngelin Preljocaj.

 

Wits Theatre, Market Theatre & Joburg Theatre
Tickets from R60 – R100
Book on Computicket
More info and full programme on the Dance Umbrella website. 

 

The post Openings This Week: JHB | A solo show, three group exhibitions and 30 years of Shifty Records appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[A Mercedes-Benz SLK Adorned in Flowers to Celebrate Spring]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85182 2014-09-01T20:19:01Z 2014-09-01T14:58:22Z

  Happy Spring Day!   Now here’s something that’s just as rare as it is (blooming) lovely – a Mercedes-Benz SLK adorned in flowers. The talented hands behind this masterpiece, which took about four hours and almost a thousand flowers […]

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Happy Spring Day!

 

Now here’s something that’s just as rare as it is (blooming) lovely – a Mercedes-Benz SLK adorned in flowers. The talented hands behind this masterpiece, which took about four hours and almost a thousand flowers to create, belong to Emma Frost of Supernatural Floral Design and her assistant Electra Nathania. So, if you’re feeling a little bitter because you’re in one of the parts of SA that hasn’t quite caught onto the spring vibes yet, weather-wise, this should brighten your day. And if it’s already warm where you are, you’ll love this all the same.

 

Video and stills by Michael Ellis. Produced for mblife.co.za.

 

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Layla Leiman <![CDATA[Director Rehad Desai talks about the making of the documentary Miners Shot Down]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85107 2014-09-01T12:01:36Z 2014-09-01T12:01:36Z

Rehad Desai speaks to us about the making of his award winning documentary, Miners Shot Down, which charts the events leading up to the tragic killings at Marikana.

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In August 2012, mineworkers in one of South Africa’s biggest platinum mines began a wildcat strike for better wages. Six days into the strike, the police used live ammunition to suppress the group, killing 34 and injuring 78. The Marikana Commission of Inquiry has been sitting since October 2012 and is due to conclude on 30 September. The events that took place and the parties involved present a dark picture of South Africa 20 years after democracy. The documentary, Miners Shot Down, charts the chronology of events leading up to the killings, and presents an alternate narrative to the one being claimed by authorities in power. Without sentimentality or bias, filmmaker and activist Rehad Desai has created a important visual record of this tragic incident, as well as a brutally honest exposé of the power relations and collusion of state and capitalism in post-apartheid ‘democratic’ South Africa. 

 

Miners Shot Down was awarded Best South African Documentary at the recent Durban International Film Festival. Currently, there is a campaign running to have the documentary shown on free-to-air TV so that more people can know the truth of what happened at Marikana. Rehad spoke to us about the making of this film…

 

Miners-Shot-Down-March-finalweb-450x640

Rehad Desai

Rehad Desai

 

How did your extensive experience in advocacy filmmaking prepare you for the making of the ‘Miners Shot Down’ documentary?

 

Nothing could have prepared me for the carnage that the massacre caused on a personal and political level. With the benefit of hindsight I was greatly assisted by my deep involvement with the miners that began with providing concrete solidarity whilst they continued with their strike and then through assisting the minority union AMCU obtain legal representation in the commission of inquiry and, through this union, families of the slain miners. This process soon led me to understand the need to produce a counter narrative to that of the police that was and still is claiming self-defence.

 

 

The documentary essentially presents the chronological sequence of events in the Marikana massacre  – can you please tell us about the role and importance of storytelling for you in your work and in particular this documentary…

 

After a few documentaries you quickly realise the importance of filmic conviction, also called dramaturgy. This was a big story that needed to be accessible not only to all South Africans but the wider world. Context was critical, but context and the information that you need to relay can also weigh down narrative pace. Getting the right balance in the first 25  minutes or so was critical. Experience allowed me to run or foreground through real-time story telling the archive and shot footage from the days in the run-up to the massacre, allowing us to show rather than tell much of the story. Careful editing of these various sources of footage is what made the film gripping and able to garner numerous awards.

 

 

How did you go about uncovering/gaining access to use the security footage, private email correspondence and at-the-scene documentation?

 

Persistence, determination and stamina. It must be said that all the security footage and police footage used was obtained through the commission of inquiry that once exhibited entered the public domain and was therefore accessible. The challenge was going through the scores of gigabytes of footage. In addition, battling to get into and obtain permission to use the TV archive took considerable work.

 

 

Please tell us about the process of putting the documentary together…

 

We shot for fifty days – interviews and visual material  – filmed for 250 days at the commission of inquiry and collected all the shot footage from the seven days leading to the massacre.  The project was 19TB in size. We edited for 8 months and used 5 editors in total, each of them bringing different skills and strengths to the film.

 

 

The events that took place at Marikana are described as the “first post-apartheid massacre” on the film website. As a filmmaker who is concerned with social rights, do you see these events as reflecting broader realities in our society?

 

Absolutely, our former revolutionary nationalists have decided to side with the capitalist class – this class has now taken over the ANC and wields it for its own purposes.

 

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The documentary ends on an incomplete and somewhat hopeless note with murder charges laid against the strike leaders and evasiveness on the part of government officials in excerpts from the inquiry. How might future developments inform the story you’ve told?

 

The film ends with a song which states that the police who killed Mambush are shaking in their boots. The massacre failed to break the strike, the workers in a tremendously brave manner continued with their strike and won significant pay increases. The NUM has been dislodged and a new militant union has taken its place. This is far from hopeless. Many exciting new developments have taken place in the SA political landscape due to Marikana, the emergence of the EFF and the break of NUMSA from COSATU are two significant developments. Marikana has laid bare the nature of SA’s transition of democracy.

 

 

Where were you when you heard about what was going on at Marikana and what prompted you to take on this project?

 

It was the events of August 13th,  by August I was there filming, I was busy with a film about the platinum sector, specifically the Bafokeng Nation and their success story when it came to BEE.

 

 

As a filmmaker and storyteller, what role do you see yourself playing in our society?

 

My role is to attempt to get people through the stories I choose to tell to reflect on events, and through reflecting ask the questions that hopefully lead to action. In short I aim to subvert the passivity of the medium, by making it active.

 

 

Is the role of a storyteller important? Why?

 

Listening and telling stories are a human need, they help us make sense of ourselves and our wider world.

 

 

Have you achieved what you hoped to achieve with this documentary?

 

More than I ever dreamed, 10 days ago the common purpose murder charges against the 270 miners were dropped. Now hopefully through the justice campaign’s use of the film we can ensure the charges are dropped.

 

 

Where/how can people watch the documentary?

 

Go to our website for more details: minershotdown.co.za or on Facebook.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Featured: Painterly Photographs by Inzajeano Latif]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85109 2014-09-01T15:31:25Z 2014-09-01T11:43:56Z

  The early years of Inzajeano Latif‘s childhood were spent in the idyllic villiage of Thornton, where he was free to explore and limited only by his own imagination. A far cry from this, he and his family then moved […]

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Girl with the BMW earrings, 'Girls'

Girl with the BMW earrings, Girls

 

The early years of Inzajeano Latif‘s childhood were spent in the idyllic villiage of Thornton, where he was free to explore and limited only by his own imagination. A far cry from this, he and his family then moved to Tottenham where he experienced a much harsher, darker reality to what he was previously used to. “All in all, my environment has been a tale of two halves, but tales that have allowed me to see and feel the world in my own way. I hope this is in some way apparent in my work,” he says.

 

Currently based in Johannesburg with the plan to create a series on Hillbrow, Inzajeano photographs people (and sometimes landscapes, both urban and natural) with the palette of a Baroque painter. Not purely in the pursuit of an interesting visual story, he’s looking for more than a picture – something that resonates with others in a way that is truthful and lasting.

 

We spoke to Inzajeano to find out more about his contrasted background, the recurring themes within his work and how he’s aiming to spend his time in South Africa.

 

What type of environment did you grow up in?

 

I was raised in Thornton, West Yorkshire which is quite close to Bradford City. My childhood there was nothing short of magical. We lived a short walking distance to all the green space a child could ever need with its own cemetery and a quarry. The perfect place for the imagination to run wild, and it did. My friends and I would often go on long adventures in search of the unknown. Things like ghosts and goblins! We often found them too. I guess it was a period that really affected me in a beautiful way. A period that will remain with me forever.

 

In stark contrast to living in West Yorkshire the move to Tottenham, London was difficult not only for me and my two brothers, but also for our mother who had been going through a very tough time with our father, her husband. He was abusive and would forever feed her with lies about things getting better for us all. They never did and when we finally settled in Tottenham they were separate more than they were together. It was the beginning of the end. We were left in a small terraced house with our dear mother who always did beyond her best to give us a blessed life.

 

Tottenham was mad! The complete opposite of what we had been used to up North. There was nowhere to play, no fields, no open spaces and the kids were pretty evil. I got used to these differences over time and emerged myself within the dark side of the ghetto known as Tottenham. It was my way of ignoring where I, all of us, had ended up. I recieved a lot of racial abuse from the kids at Saint Ignatius upper school and it took me a while to get over it. The fact that we now lived in one of the roughest areas in the UK didn’t help matters but we dealt with it and it has made me the man I am today. So all in all my environment has been a tale of two halves, but tales that have allowed me to see and feel the world in my own way. I hope this is in some way apparent in my work.

 

The Beginning of the End

The Beginning of the End

 

When did you realise that you wanted to pursue a career as a photographer, and how have you gone about doing so?

 

As far back as I can remember I have always been a visual person but for some reason I came into photography quite late in my life. In 2005 I left the fashion course I was doing. I felt that I had outgrown fashion and it seemed like that could not give me what I needed at the time. I was going through personal changes and this informed the choice I made regarding fashion. The university that I was at were offering a BA in photography so I took a small handful of images and went to speak to the course leader. Low and behold I was given an unconditional offer and I’ve never looked back since.

 

Photography is something that completely fascinates me. The things it allows me to explore really suit the way I am as a person. I’m always searching, exploring, and learning.

 

I work bloody hard in order to have a balance of creating personal projects as well as getting paid work in photography. I believe I have something to give in the way I approach a subject, whether it be for a personal or a commercial reason. Everything has to come from the soul and have depth as well as surface.

 

I try my best to work as hard as I can and I will never give up because I feel that this is what I was born to do. This is the driving force behind what I do and what energizes me to get work and keep on making work.

 

I finished my BA and then went on to do a Masters at Middlesex which I feel was a bad idea as the course leader at the time was obviously incapable of giving the few students bar one what we needed. There was a lot of favouritism and empty promises directed to me especially but definitely a few lessons were learnt from this experience; never give up!

 

You primarily focus on portraiture. What draws you to this genre?

 

I’ve been thinking about this question for some time now. At this stage of my life one of the answers is to understand myself and the world around me. I have a burning desire to photograph people. To capture the essence of someone in a portrait, which then becomes a photograph that I hope will transcend time. Another response to this is that I see a part of myself in everyone that I photograph. The one thought that stays with me all the time when making images of people could sound strange – I sometimes see myself as someone from another place, far away from planet Earth, and in my time here I photograph what mesmerizes me the most, which is people.

 

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

 

In what ways has your background in fashion continued to influence you as a photographer today?

 

Fashion taught me to think in many different ways. Different ways to set the mood of a story based on colour and symmetry, and how the garment interplays with these functions and allows the story to unfold. I also realised early on that honesty to oneself is probably one of the most important functions and to an extent I felt the fashion world wasn’t honest in the way it started to portray itself, especially through the visual language. I believe in the relationship that analogue and digital can have, but there seem to be no limits in some cases when looking at the fashion world and to me that world strays from the truth as much as possible. I’m just glad that there’s still some wonderful fashion work to be seen so all is not lost.

 

What else are you influenced and inspired by?

 

I’m quite influenced by the work of August Sander especially ‘People of the 20th Century’. In addition to this I appreciate the Dutch painters such as Pieter de hooch, Johannes Vermeer to name a few as well as Ivan Aivazovsky; a Russian painter whom I think had a magical way of using colour in his works.

 

The biggest inspiration to me and my work would be Edward Hopper. His paintings present layers of time that existed yet they allow the viewer to imagine other things. For me they are mysteriously dark and at times remind me of a classic American Sci-fi series I love called The Twilight Zone.

 

How would you describe your style or aesthetic, and how has this developed since you first started out?

 

I’m not quite sure how I would describe my style or aesthetic. This is something I like to hear from others who view or critique my work. I do know that whatever it is I do when making pictures it is growing and evolving, and with each picture I make I impart a little more of myself.

 

I do think a fair bit of my work is just that, as well as reading, researching and listening to music – especially jazz. I feel that all these processes allow my style to flow and evolve naturally.

 

Since the beginning the stories have always been there, I just didn’t have the technical knowledge I needed to create them. Now I am a tad more confident.

 

The Beginning of the End

The Beginning of the End

 

Many of your portraits form part of a larger series including The beginning of the end, This is Tottenham and The pursuit of happiness. Could you tell us more about each of these?

 

For a long time I was quite strict with myself when it came to working on a series of images that hope to tell a specific story. It was how my fellow photographers and I were taught whilst studying. A series had to be formed in a very terse manner and there was no room for taking risks or being different in one’s approach. That’s the narrative that we were taught at university. In my own little bubble of thoughts I often questioned it whilst being able to appreciate that at times it’s a method that’s needed. But what happens when the thought processes in your mind are quite erratic and troubled? For me, this flux made me decide to take a different approach to the series I call The beginning of the end. Preceding the start of this work I had some images that at the time were one-offs but they still meant something to me that I had not yet understood. It was an understanding that lay deep in my psyche and something that would come to the fore some years later.

 

One day whilst I was out shooting my Tottenham series it’s as if everything just slowed down, I stopped and looked ahead at a young woman pushing a pram under grey clouds and I began to think about her and her child’s life. What was their life all about, where was it going and were they happy? Questions we all ask ourselves but at the best of times are afraid to answer. I began to question our society, our leaders, and our governments. I was weary of humanities future and at that specific moment in time I felt that it was the beginning of the end.

 

I began to slowly photograph people, places and things that evoke both the feeling of the beginning and the end, because for me they are the same thing. It represents the circle of life. This allows me to be quite diverse in my approach and what I include in the series and the formats I shoot in. I feel it’s giving the series a sense of maturity and a very fluid perspective, almost like the erratic yet fluid thoughts that occur in my mind when thinking of matters related to humanity and its impermanence.

 

Female Boxers and Girls are collections of portraits that centre on women – exploring the way they are perceived and the way they see themselves. Would you say that this is a recurring theme in your work, and why?

 

To some extent it is. I try not to take things as they appear. The line between what is real and what is not is quite blurred these days so I question things, I have the urge to look beneath the surface whilst sharing something that is literally on a surface.

 

So many factors are involved which have an impression on us and inform the way we are and what we become. Much of this information is no longer passed down through family and close friends, it’s information we absorb from the societies we live in, things we read, what we watch and how we are told to behave. I try and unravel these things in an attempt to understand and accept, but the deeper I go the more I questions I ask and the more questions I ask the more answers I get. It’s a viscous circle if you like.

 

I read a lot of John Berger’s works and this was the pretext for exploring women. On one hand we have boxing, the gentlemen’s game, quite a posh name for a brutal sport and yet here are these women who choose to partake in the process. Whether it’s to get fit or to train for competitions the choice they make is a powerful one and almost a statement in itself. We live in a world where women are subjected to the most brutal sexual advertising campaigns without batting an eye lid, it’s accepted and something we all look at often without a second glance of course unless the female figure is used in an obviously sexually charged way. For example to sell a car! Then we are all eyes and looking at the vulnerable female as opposed to what’s for sale. So what is really for sale?

 

This is why I explore women. Whether it’s through the series on female boxers or a simple series on girls who I invite to come to the studio and have their portrait taken. I like to test the viewer’s perception on these matters and try and understand humanity through works like this.

 

Female Boxers

Female Boxers

 

You’re currently based in Johannesburg. What has your experience in South Africa been so far?

 

South Africa is a country that needs no introduction for obvious reasons. There’s a lot to explore here, a lot to try and understand which for me is the perfect starting point in to begin a project. I always begin by not photographing.

 

On the surface all looks well but I am realising that there are cracks and it’s these cracks that I am compelled to explore.

 

So far I am having a very positive experience. Magazines and newspapers seem quite open to work with me which is also great as I love the challenge of editorial work. I’m looking forward to what’s in store.

 

What are you working on at the moment, and what are your plans going forward?

 

At the moment I am working on a project in London entitled This is Tottenham. It’s a look at the changing landscape of an area that is clouded with negativity. I am making the invisible visible through a series of portraits as well as imagery of the spaces and things that make up the area of Tottenham and the changes it’s going through. I have been working on it for the past 5 years so it’s a slow burner but something I’m extremely passionate and excited about.

 

Whilst in Joburg I hope to make a series on Hillbrow. I had to drive there recently and its energy and ambience totally captivated me. At the moment I am looking for organisations and community groups that I can work with on this project.

 

My plan going forward is to always make work because I want to, not just because it will make an interesting visual story. A story for me needs to be more than a picture. It has to resonate and have a perennial quality to it. I want people to be engaged by my work, to be a part of it, to look back at it in a hundred years and see a truthful portrayal of what life was like.

 

Stay up to date with Inzajeano on Twitter or visit www.inzajeano.com for more.

 

Female Boxers

Female Boxers

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

This is Tottenham

Ligita, 'Girls'

Ligita, Girls

Camp Shatilla

Camp Shatilla

Emilia, The Pursuit of Happiness

Emilia, The Pursuit of Happiness

No Ball Games, A Night Oddysey

No Ball Games, A Night Oddysey

Seven acts of domestic violence

Seven acts of domestic violence

Seven acts of domestic violence

Seven acts of domestic violence

Rawan, Al Ghurba (The Exile)

Rawan, Al Ghurba (The Exile)

Maha, Al Ghurba (The Exile)

Maha, Al Ghurba (The Exile)

The Beginning of the End

The Beginning of the End

The Beginning of the End

The Beginning of the End

Alisa, The pursuit of happiness

Alisa, The pursuit of happiness

 

The post Featured: Painterly Photographs by Inzajeano Latif appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Alix-Rose Cowie <![CDATA[Ads This Week: 30 Seconds, Cooking With Friends and Toddlers from Hell]]> http://10and5.com/?p=84272 2014-08-29T14:59:36Z 2014-08-29T14:59:36Z

In Ads This Week we're looking, in horror, at great illustrated print ads for World Leisure Holidays, watching a pretty spot on 30 Seconds re-enactment for Nokia, looking at hundreds of roosters, babies and clocks in jars for Origin Dark Roast Coffee, watching choreography at -2.5°C for Castle Lite, cooking with friends and Woolworths, and viewing the latest edition to the DStv Feel Every Moment campaign.

The post Ads This Week: 30 Seconds, Cooking With Friends and Toddlers from Hell appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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In Ads This Week we’re looking, in horror, at great illustrated print ads for World Leisure Holidays, watching a pretty spot on 30 Seconds re-enactment for Nokia, looking at hundreds of roosters, babies and clocks in jars for Origin Dark Roast Coffee, watching choreography at -2.5°C for Castle Lite, cooking with friends and Woolworths, and viewing the latest edition to the DStv Feel Every Moment campaign.

 

OpenCo for World Leisure Holidays

 

Children of the Pool 03 Little Shop of Toddlers Little Shop of Toddlers

 

What could be worse than having your dream holiday in Mauritius wrecked by children, particularly other people’s brats. Thankfully there is a place where absolutely no children under the age of 16 are allowed. The contemporary WLH Ambre Adult Resort is the perfect holiday escape.Our solution was to use iconic horror movie titles to communicate a situation where these brats would invade your dream holiday.The primary target are young couples and singles who has never had kids and are less likely to respond with empathy to families and misbehaving kids. However empty nesters and even parents could relate to the torture of going on holidays with kids.

 

Credits:

Creative Director & Art Director – Steven Brewis
Illustrator – Oscar Ramos
Executive Creative Director / Copywriter – Louis Gavin
Art Director – Sean Donovan

 

#Lumia30 for Nokia 

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

If there is one thing all South Africans can relate to, it’s a fun (and sometimes frustrating) game of 30 Seconds. Our unique approach to describing random things brings out our truly South African humour. The latest online Lumia video from Microsoft showcases a unique way of storytelling, and the importance of imaging. Thanks to their leading imaging technology, Lumia owners always have the ability to tell better stories with pictures.

 

“Made at -2.5°C” for Castle Lite by Ogilvy & Mather Cape Town

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

It’s no secret that Castle Lite is always served extra cold and, whilst the full recipe is kept under lock and key, the Brand’s latest campaign reveals a few secrets on how it locks in that great tasting, extra cold refreshment. Whilst other beers in the SAB stable are matured at -2 degrees, a critical part of the multiple-stage process, Castle Lite is uniquely matured at -2.5 degrees which primarily precipitates any haze causing substances and, secondly, ‘settles’ the flavours ensuring a consistent tasting and clear looking, ‘bright’ beer. This unique sub-zero lagering process ensures that the full flavour of Castle Lite is locked in, delivering the extra cold refreshment for which the beer and brand has become renowned for.

 

Castle Lite created a new TV commercial to officially launch the campaign. The commercial gives consumers a glimpse into the Castle Lite brewery and shares the story of how the beer is made. The 30-second ad features UK based actor and choreographer Sep Dashti unlocking his dubstep moves in the brewery, on a custom-created extra cold set at the old Bus Factory (now called Market Lab) in Newtown, Johannesburg. Well-known actress and choreographer Lorcia Cooper was responsible for coordinating the various dance moves seen in the ad.

 

Credits:

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather, Cape Town
Directed by Chloe Coetsee of Fringe/Bouffant

 

DStv Feel Every Moment ‘Doc Shebeleza’ by Ogilvy & Mather Johannesburg

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Frieze Films’ Malo 8 directed Doc Shebeleza, the latest installment in Ogilvy’s popular Feel Every Moment DSTV campaign. The spot features a mother watching her two daughters dancing – adorably – to Cassper Nyovest’s hit music video on DSTV. Malo’s challenge was to create something new that still felt like a natural progression from the first four ads. “I wanted to make the campaign more light-hearted and upbeat,” says Malo. “But without losing the believability and sophistication of the campaign so far.” To do so, Malo brought on DP Werner Maritz, who shot on anamorphic lenses to create a filmic look, and worked closely with the child actors and Deepend Post editor Paul West to make sure the performances felt real and unrehearsed. After just ten days online, the spot is already the most popular of the campaign so far on YouTube.

 

Credits:

Agency: Ogilvy
Creative team: Neo Mashigo, Sibusiso Sithole, Vuyo Mpantsha, and Innocent Mukheli
Agency producer: Juliet Curtis
Production company: Frieze Films
Director: Malo8
Producer: Liz Dahl
DOP: Werner Maritz
Editor: Paul West
Post production: Deepend Post
Sound: Louis Enslin

 

‘Instantly Awake’ for Origin Coffee Roasters by Joe Public, Johannesburg

 

origin_crowing_aotw origin_cacophony_aotw origin_crying_aotw

 

Credits:

Advertising Agency: Joe Public, Johannesburg
Creative Directors: Adam Weber, Xolisa Dyeshana
Art Director: Wynand Botha
Copywriter: Annette de Klerk
Illustrator / Photographer: Carioca

 

MasterChef ‘Cook with Friends’ App and Competition by Woolworths and Gloo

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

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This year, Woolworths is going to change MasterChef South Africa’s viewers from spectators, to participants. Encouraging participation and engagement amongst food lovers across the nation. Uniting them in a shared passion: The love of great food! THE CHALLENGE: Essentially, 4 friends cook 1 dish to make 1 foodie video together. The friends can either get together, each cooking and filming a part of the recipe. The 4 videos are then automatically compiled into one and posted to Facebook. The winning group’s video will then receive an amazing foodie experience with celebrity chef and MasterChef South Africa Judge Rueben Riffel for all 4 friends to enjoy together. HOW IT WILL WORK: Step 1: Download Cook With Friends App, Step 2: Add 3 Facebook friends to cook with you, Step 3: Film your part of the recipe, then mix together each friend’s clip to make 1 foodie video, Step 4: Serve online and hold thumbs.For more info, visit woolworths.co.za/cookwithfriends or download the Cook With Friends App free from your App store.

 

Credits:
Executive Creative Director – Fred Benistant
Art Director – Jennifer Macfarlane
Copywriter – Dale Winton
Production TVC – Platypus Productions
Music – Softlight city
Still photography – Robert Koene
Agency Production – Mandy Hendler
Client service – Rachma Hendriks
App development – Gloo

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Nando’s ‘Blue Light Parade’ TVC]]> http://10and5.com/?p=85069 2014-08-29T13:23:18Z 2014-08-29T14:30:35Z

  This brand new Nando’s television commercial by MetropolitanRepublic is just as cheeky as you’d expect, showing what happens when four ministerial cavalcades try to cross the same intersection at the same time. The minister of ‘Inland Fisheries’, the minister of ‘Stationery’ and […]

The post Nando’s ‘Blue Light Parade’ TVC appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Click here to view the embedded video.

 

This brand new Nando’s television commercial by MetropolitanRepublic is just as cheeky as you’d expect, showing what happens when four ministerial cavalcades try to cross the same intersection at the same time. The minister of ‘Inland Fisheries’, the minister of ‘Stationery’ and two other imaginary ministers are all en route to important meetings when they nearly collide. A street fight almost ensues between their escorts as they argue about who is more important and who should have the right of way. Just before it gets serious, the situation is humorously diffused in a truly South African (and typically Nando’s) way, hinting that this is just another day here.

 

Credits:

 

Advertising Agency – MetropolitanRepublic

Executive Creative Director – Gareth Lessing

Creative Director – Tim Beckerling

Creative Director – Sean Harrison

Art Director – Moira-Gene Sephton Gous

Art Director – Bergen Nielson

Copywriter – Candice Hellens

Copywriter – Hendrik Lustig

Digital Art Director – Bongani Dube

Group Business Director – Rainer Pabst

Account Director – Sharon Premchund

TV Producer – Tanya Wagner / Nicola Martin

Strategist – Thian Potgieter

Production Company – 0307 Films

Director – Kim Geldenhuys

Producer – Tess Van Zyl

Director of Photography – Alard De Smit

Post Production House – Upstairs Post

Editor – Kobus Loots

Audio Production Company – Audio One

Audio Engineer – Barry Donnelly

Animation Company – Wicked Pixels

Animator – Carl Jeppe

Music – Audio Militia

 

Find Nando’s on FacebookTwitter and check out their website to keep up.

 

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

Nando's 'Blue Light Parade' TVC

 

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