Between 10 and 5 The South African creative showcase 2015-03-05T21:07:41Z http://10and5.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[#NowPlaying: Identity Heft, South Africa]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103421 2015-03-05T14:57:07Z 2015-03-05T12:00:52Z

Jasper Berg recently spent some time in Cape Town, a trip which provided him with ample inspiration to curate an all-local playlist for David Byrne Radio.

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John Wizards

John Wizards

 

Todo Mundo’s music coordinator Jasper Berg recently made his way to South Africa, which provided him with ample inspiration to compile the March playlist for David Byrne Radio. Titled ‘Identity Heft, South Africa’, the tracks were chosen by Jasper with the help of his cousin Tourmaline Berg and the naasMUSIC team.

 

“While there isn’t much genre continuity,” he says of his selections, “this month’s playlist represents an overall paradigm shift in popular music produced in South Africa.” He goes on to offer some thoughts on the success of SA music abroad saying, “Perhaps the reason why South African musicians have had little success in ‘the West’ is because there has been an expectation that it all needs to sound…you know…African. There had been a period where it seemed as though musicians were fascinated by the success of artists overseas, and looked to create music that would cater specifically to Western audiences. I couldn’t help but notice that in following that school of thought, the music suffered, and unfortunately, that particular model for success didn’t seem to work.”

 

During his semi-annual visit to Cape Town to see his parents and extended family, Jasper developed a keen excitement for the general direction that local music seemed to be heading in. “The music sounded unique; all to its own,” he says. “The music celebrates who they are as a people, as South Africans, with melodies, rhythms, and lyrics unique to that corner of the world. The desire for overseas success appears to have disappeared.”

 

‘Identity Heft, South Africa’ comes in at over 2 hours full of our favourites. Give it a whirl below, and find the tracklist on Mixcloud.

 

 

Browse our archives, 8tracks or Soundcloud for more #NowPlaying.

 

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Alix-Rose Cowie <![CDATA[Khuli Chana ‘9 Shots’ Music Video by Kyle Lewis]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103405 2015-03-05T11:28:02Z 2015-03-05T11:28:02Z

In late October 2013, South African hip hop artist Khuli Chana was shot at by police in Johannesburg in a case of mistaken identity. A year later he released '9 Shots' as a free download. Today he released the official music video for the track directed by Arcade Content's Kyle Lewis.

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Click here to view the embedded video.

 

In late October 2013, South African hip hop artist Khuli Chana was shot at by police in Johannesburg in a case of mistaken identity. A year later he released ‘9 Shots’ as a free download. Today he released the official music video for the track directed by Arcade Content‘s Kyle Lewis. The visuals are rich in symbolism, a style that’s becoming a signature for the director who says, “I feel like I’ve found my style. I’m using almost photographic compositions, with small, subtle movements, and very symbolic, very African imagery, that people can think a bit deeper about. It’s a look I want to continue to explore in my hip hop videos.”

 

Khuli wanted the video to be a reflection on his journey from anger to forgiveness and his fluctuation between hopelessness and hopefulness. The video is apparently not meant to be an attack on the SAPS but rather a story about “Khuli’s journey to healing in the medium that ultimately saved his life: music.”

 

Credits:

 

Directed by Kyle Lewis
Shot by Roscoe Vercueil
Edited by Stephen du Plessis
Make-up and styling by Kaley Meyer

 

khulichana.com

 

Khuli-Chana-9-Shots-3 Khuli-Chana-9-Shots-music-video Khuli-Chana-9-Shots

 

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Mosa Mahlaba <![CDATA[The Art of Andrzej Urbanski | A Short Film by Makhulu]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103215 2015-03-05T09:00:11Z 2015-03-05T10:00:07Z

Andrzej Urbanski relates his art to his other obsession, MMA fighting, in this video profile by Rowan Pybus of Makhulu.

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Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Filmed and edited by Rowan Pybus of Makhulu Productions, The Art of Andrzej Urbanski is a short film that profiles Cape Town based, Polish artist Andrzej Urbanski. The video is a showcase of the artist in studio turning a bare canvas into a piece of graffiti-inspired artwork bursting with colour, but constructed with systematic lines and shapes.

 

Narrated by Andrzej himself, the film gives the viewer a peak into his life as he speaks of some of the things that inspire him and his ongoing effort to create handmade art that looks computer-generated. He also shares insights into how he relates his painting to MMA fighting and speaks about the balance between the two disciplines.

 

The filmmaker and the artist are close friends and have been supporting each other’s careers for almost four years. Rowan says, “This video is a culmination of that time together. A time often spent discussing the power of art and the effect that colour and shape has on us all.”

 

Credits:

 

Filmed and edited by Rowan Pybus
Produced by Makhulu Productions
Music by Ross Fink

 

www.aurbanski.com

Andrzej will be exhibiting his work at Salon91 from 18 March to 18 April.

 

 

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (2)

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (1)

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (6)

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (7)

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (8)

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (5)

The Art of Andrzej Urbanski (9)

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[A Guide to First Thursdays | 5 March 2015]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103363 2015-03-05T13:18:18Z 2015-03-05T08:43:45Z

It's First Thursdays in Cape Town tonight, which means there will be more events and exhibitions around town than you could possibly attend in 4 hours. Here's our pick of 10 things to see and do between 5pm and 9pm tonight.

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It’s First Thursdays in Cape Town tonight, which means there will be more events and exhibitions around town than you could possibly attend in 4 hours. Here’s our pick of 10 things to see and do between 5pm and 9pm tonight, good luck not getting distracted.

 

Stop 1: Brundyn Gallery | 170 Buitengracht Street

 

Precious Obsession, a pop-up jewellery exhibition is taking place at Brundyn Gallery. See the Facebook event for more info.

 

Precious Obsession

 

Stop 2: Friends of Design | 186 Bree Street

 

Greymatter, a photography exhibition by Nicette dos Santos is opening at Friends of Design. See the Facebook event for more info.

 

 Nicette dos Santos

 

Stop 3: The Pit at Clarke’s | 133 Bree Street

 

The Road Is Home, a photography exhibition and zine launch by Thomas Pepler is taking place at Clarke’s The Pit. See the Facebook event for more.

 

Thomas Pepler

Thomas Pepler

 

Stop 4: SAM | 1st floor, 107 Bree Street

 

Tour of Arae 2014, a new installation of photographs, maps, artefacts and actual bicycles by photographer and bicycle enthusiast Stan Engelbrecht is opening at South African Market (SAM). See the Facebook event for more.

 

Stan Engelbrech

 

Stop 5: Luvey ‘n Rose | 66 Loop Street

 

Two exhibitions are opening at Luvey ‘n Rose. Too Young to Die by Wilhelm Saayman is opening alongside Studio Bomb by Stephen Allwright. Find Luvey ‘n Rose on Facebook for updates.

 

Stephen Allwright

Stephen Allwright

Wilhelm Saayman

Wilhelm Saayman

 

Stop 6: Gallery F | 78 Shortmarket Street

 

PAPA Chapter Two, a retrospective group photography show of B/W analogue photography from the 70s – 90s is opening at Gallery F. All images are South African generated works and highly collectable.

 

PAPA Chapter Two

 

Stop 7: Chandler House | 53 Church Street 

 

INSTAGENIC #sontagged, an exhibition of Instagram photos by 9 local Instagrammers to showcase their daily lives in the Cape is opening at Chandler House’s Voorkamer Gallery. Find Chandler House on Facebook for updates.

 

Gabrielle Guy (@gabrielleguy)

Gabrielle Guy | instagram.com/gabrielleguy 

 

Stop 8: The Jan Royce Gallery | 64 Church Street 

 

Young Guns, an exhibition of sculptures and objects by emerging artists Adriaan Diedericks, Stanislaw Trzebinski and Victor Kirov is opening at The Jan Royce Gallery. The artists work with bronze, resin, and stainless steel. See the gallery’s Facebook page for more.

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Stop 9: Worldart | 54 Church Street 

 

The nature of our presence, Ricky Lee Gordon’s first ever indoor solo show is opening at Worldart. See their Facebook page for more.

 

Ricky Lee Gordon

 

Stop 10: AVA Gallery | 52 Church Street 

 

AVA Gallery

 

Forming Impressions: The Ghost in the Machine, an exhibition of original prints from Warren Editions and Artist Proof Studio is on show at the AVA Gallery. See the gallery’s website for more.

 

Top tip: Use the Lucha Libre Piggyback Taxi Service to get around. 

 

Watch out for five burly Lucha Libre wrestlers at a special ‘piggyback taxi rank’ at the top of Shortmarket Street (in front of The House of Machines). They will be offering free piggyback rides between bars and galleries tonight. While being ferried by these colourfully dressed wrestlers, you’ll get to experience the new ZANG caffeinated chocolate.

 

To hail a ZANG Lucha Libre piggyback taxi, just tweet #ZangLift @ZangChocolate and go to the ZANG taxi rank.

 

Top tip: Use the Lucha Libre Piggyback Taxi Service to get around.

 

 

Join the First Thursdays Facebook event, see #FirstThursdays on Twitter or find them on Instagram for more.

Also see the First Thursdays website for the full lists of monthly highlights.

 

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Unathi Mkonto’s Collection in an Otherworldly Shoot by Kope | Figgins]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103334 2015-03-05T08:40:53Z 2015-03-05T08:40:53Z

A dusty and vacant scene is injected with pastel tones, electric blue and blacks in Kope | Figgins‘ recent shoot showcasing a collection by Unathi Mkonto.

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Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (9)

 

A dusty and vacant scene is injected with pastel tones, electric blue and blacks in Kope | Figgins‘ fantastic fashion story for Contributor, showcasing a collection by Unathi Mkonto. The nonsensical, off-beat props by artist Kerry Chaloner add another dimension of unreality to the already surreal set of images.

 

“Unathi Mkonto approached us to shoot some of his collection,” Jonathan Kope and Jarred Figgins told us. “Instead of going the whole flowery, cute girls in a field, boho route that seems to be quite fancied at the moment, we decided to try and push it more towards the other end. We, as a general industry, can be quite restricted at times. So it’s really great to do something a bit more left field and not necessarily conventional.”

 

It was this unconventional approach that drew Unathi to the photography duo to begin with. “We were looking for authenticity in fashion,” he says. “I wanted to portray a girl who has left her past behind and is ready to invent a new world for herself, and Kope | Figgins created that radical context.” Unathi’s collection addresses the darker side of fashion. “The clothes directly offend, but are at the same time inviting,” he says. The silk dresses modelled by Alexa at Boss Models are deliberately oversized and inspired by an active attitude.

 

For a long time Unathi has been interested in Kerry’s use of available resources in her process. As well as props, she provided additional styling and direction to augment the concept Kope | Figgins had in mind. “In all my work I take cues from site and the materials at hand. Unathi’s dresses hint at the liberated women of the Roaring 20s with an impeccable ultra-modern cut and luxe fabric,” Kerry explains. “We used contrasting texture and a play between evening, street and workwear to highlight their modernity. Alexa is otherworldly, and I wanted to gesture towards the destruction and construction of new worlds. This was happening quite literally at the location under a blazing midday sun with bulldozers around us.”

 

Credits:

 

Photography: Kope | Figgins

Fashion: Unathi Mkonto

Props, styling and direction: Kerry Chaloner

Hair and make-up: Nandi Kai

Model: Alexa @ Boss Models

 

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (2)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (3)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (4)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (8)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (5)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (6)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (7)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (10)

Unathi Mkonto x Kope Figgins (11)

 

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Catherine Rudolph <![CDATA[Ovahimba Youth Self Portraits by Kyle Weeks]]> http://10and5.com/?p=102949 2015-03-04T16:01:49Z 2015-03-04T14:12:35Z

There is a palpable sense of self expressed in the young Himba men depicted in Kyle Weeks' striking ongoing photographic series, The Ovahimba Youth Self Portraits.

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Kyle Weeks

Maerivanga Ndiaombe

 

There is a palpable sense of self expressed in the young Himba men depicted in Kyle Weeks‘ striking ongoing photographic series, The Ovahimba Youth Self Portraits. The series captures the men’s distinctly unique personalities, but also reflects something universal about being young and being human; the viewer and the sitter are likely to come from vastly different environments, but the subjects’ expressions and openness create a cord of relatability.

 

After completing his BA in photography at the Stellenbosch Academy in 2013, Kyle returned to his home in Namibia, where he shot this project. The Ovahimba people are semi-nomadic pastoralists who live in the north-western part of Namibia. They have been viewed as one of the last groups of people untouched by Western civilisation, and this is often reiterated in the pictures taken by tourists. This negation of nuance in an evolving cultural identity echoes the Western world’s tendency to exoticise foreign cultures. The rift between representation and reality is what prompted Kyle to photograph the Ovahimba men. He chose subjects all very close to his own age, so as to narrow the societal and cultural gap and allow for a heightened sense of relation between himself and his subjects, which is conveyed in the candid, intimate portraits.

 

Initially, the photographs remind one of ethnographic portraits taken in the 1900s by Western photographers and documentarians. Such representations reduced subjects to objects, where the camera was merely a tool in cultural reductionism and served to maintain existing power structures. Thus, it is significant that this is a series of self portraits: Kyle puts the shutter release cable into the hands of his subjects, allowing them to take control of their own image. The power dynamic is therefore shifted: we see these young men as they wish to be seen, self-styled in their favourite items of clothing. The attire reflects a hybridisation of traditional cultural dress and Western influence: Puma, Louis Vuitton and Lacoste are worn with necklaces and beaded collars. Each outfit is a site of self expression: some T-shirts have been cut and reworked, bright colours and patterns abound and jackets are donned with downright swag.

 

The unmarried men of the Ovahimba all wear their hair in a single plait extending down the back of the head, with the rest of the head shaved. This is called an ondatu and indicates their status in society, in which they are designated the role of herding cattle (something they take great pride in). There remains a strong affinity for tradition and culture in the Ovahimba community. The portraits thus depict conscious reflection on cultural and personal identity in a rapidly modernizing, globalized world.

 

Ovahimba Youth is not only a beautiful series of images; it shows photography can be an empowering art form giving voice to individuality and raising significant issues in the ethics of representing difference.

 

Kyle Weeks

 Tjimbininyama Hivita

 

Kyle Weeks

 Nduombe Ndjundja

 

Kyle Weeks

Ndepee Muundjwa

 

Kyle Weeks

 Ngatangwe Tjiuma

 

Kyle Weeks

 Kaondi Mbendura

 

Kyle Weeks

Vezepaumwe Hembinda

 

Kyle Weeks

 Matuvetwapi Tjiposa

 

Kyle Weeks

 Wakarerera Tjondu

 

Kyle Weeks

 Vanavaina Tjiumbua

 

Kyle Weeks

Kaunda Muhenye

 

Kyle Weeks

 Waandja Rumuno

 

Kyle Weeks

 Zatumbwamo Muniombara

 

Kyle Weeks

 Vevakeramo Ngombe

 

Kyle Weeks

 Vemuvirira Mutambo

 

Kyle Weeks

 Kapanda Mbendura

 

Kyle Weeks

Vapanenamo Tjiposa

 

Kyle Weeks

 Nambata Tjiposa

 

Kyle Weeks

Maezepako Tjindunda

 

Kyle Weeks

Kandu Kapika

 

Kyle Weeks

 Kazeru Muundjwa 

 

 

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Catherine Rudolph <![CDATA[The Mahoyo Project in Johannesburg: Lives lived Breaking Stereotypes]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103153 2015-03-04T15:15:12Z 2015-03-04T12:55:04Z

The all-female collective Mahoyo comes from Stockholm to Johannesburg to find creative and cultural exchange.

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The Mahoyo Project is a documentary aimed at breaking stereotypes of gender, race and location. Filmed in Johannesburg, it follows Mahoyo, three Swedish creatives on the pursuit of cultural and creative exchange. In the documentary they collaborate with local artists in the growing urban music, fashion and dance scene in Johannesburg, and place this in conversation/contrast with Stockholm’s creative scene and characters.

 

Mahoyo are Farah Yusuf, and Pia and MyNa Do, a group of DJs and photographers. The name is a reference to the Do sisters’ Chinese heritage and Farah’s Somalian roots, “Ma” and “Hoyo” meaning mother in Mandarin and Somali, respectively. Having lived their whole lives in Sweden, they often faced cultural prejudice and ignorance. They told OkayAfrica: “We grew up constantly being asked where we’re from, or told how great our Swedish is by people who have narrow ideas of what a Swede should look like,” says Pia.  Yet this has galvanised them to challenge such ideas by embracing difference. As Farah says, “It’s no fun looking like everyone else.”

 

The documentary was shot in Johannesburg, a city with a reputation for crime (and bad traffic), but which they show to be a place of creativity and contrast. The trio found inspiration for the project when they saw Stocktown X South Africa, a documentary about our local music and street culture, curated by Stockholm-based online video magazine Stocktown. They loved the characters and images captured, but noticed a distinct lack of female presence. In an interview with Zanele Mji for OkayAfrica, MyNa reflected: “When we asked the directors where all the women were they just kind of shrugged. We realized that no one can represent the way we see the world but ourselves.”

 

The strong feminist drive of Mahoyo extended to most of their interactions in South Africa: they collaborated with DJ Phola “Loveslave” Gumede on different events including a workshop that taught women how to DJ and a party called Shandeez With Gäris (“Party with girls”). This party featured an all-female lineup, with local DJs, rappers and poets.

 

Ultimately, creative efforts such as The Mahoyo Project encourage cultural exchange rather than exclusion and enable understanding of one another as human beings, rather than reductive narratives of what we should be.

 

Find them on Facebook or Instagram, and check out their website mahoyo.com.

 

Via OkayAfrica

 

Mahoyo ProjectMahoyo ProjectMahoyo ProjectMahoyo ProjectMahoyo ProjectMahoyo ProjectMahoyo Project

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[AKEDO Online | A Desination For ‘Weird’ Local Fashion]]> http://10and5.com/?p=102926 2015-03-04T13:11:17Z 2015-03-04T11:00:38Z

AKEDO - the brand, and the online store housing local designers - is based on finding the balance between sophisticated and 'weird' design.

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AKEDO (1)

 

The fashion label of Eleni Labrou, AKEDO is based on finding the balance between sophisticated and highly unusual design. Using this as the premise, she conceptualised an online store which would house her own brand as well as those of other designers.

 

“All the designers featured on the store create incredible, stand out ‘weird’ clothing that is still wearable for the general public,” says Eleni. The most important thing she looks out for when selecting new designers is how strong their brand is. It’s not about how big of a following they have but rather, how well a particular brand is conceived, considered and put together. Currently AKEDO Online features Anmari Honiball, Bomber, Fortune, Jana + Koos, Jenevieve Lyons, Lumin, Me.Plus.One, Rayne, Oath, Samantha Constable and Amos Tranque – with new additions lined up for April.

 

Bomber

Me.Plus.One

Lumin

Amos Tranque

Fortune

 

Following its initial launch in August 2014, AKEDO Online was given a fresh redesign in January this year. Working with developer Chris Mallis, Eleni wanted something that was practical and easy to use. “The inspiration for the new design came from tons of research into what makes a site functional to the user, while staying true to the brand’s aesthetic,” she explains.

 

AKEDO Online

AKEDO Online (ART)

 

The store is Eleni’s first experience as a retailer, and she’s learnt a lot through the process. “I’m still figuring out exactly what direction I want things to go in,” she says. “It’s like a little baby, you feed it and care for it but you never really know what it will turn out to be. It’s really exciting, and can only get better as I learn more.” From a branding perspective, Eleni plans to increase exports of AKEDO into Europe and to create a more affordable and wearable diffusion line for the South African market. Future plans for AKEDO Online include frequent public events, as a way to foster a real connection with the audience.

 

Browse the new site at www.akedo.co.za and stay up to date with AKEDO on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

 

AKEDO (2)

AKEDO (4)

AKEDO (3)

AKEDO

 

Bomber_gold_3

Bomber_black_2

Bomber (shot by JP Hanekom)

 

jenevieve-lyons (1)

jenevieve-lyons (2)

Jenevieve Lyons (shot by Kent Andreasen)

 

OATH_AW15_PAUL_SAMUELS_010

OATH_AW15_PAUL_SAMUELS_007

OATH (shot by Paul Samuels)

 

samantha-constable (2)

samantha-constable (1)

Samantha Constable (shot by Andrew Berry)

 

me plus one x Jana and Koos (2)

me plus one x Jana and Koos (1)

Me.Plus.One x Jana + Koos (shot by Zander Opperman)

 

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Mosa Mahlaba <![CDATA[Woza Sisi | Photos of Street Hairstylists by Dahlia Maubane]]> http://10and5.com/?p=103102 2015-03-04T10:44:07Z 2015-03-04T10:44:07Z

Woza Sisi is a photo series by Dahlia Maubane that explores the lives of street hairstylist who work in Johannesburg's CBD.

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©dahliamaubane_wozasisi001

 

In her work-in-progress photo series Woza Sisi, photographer and multimedia designer, Dahlia Maubane, creates a new lens through which to look at the lives and experiences of migrant women who line the streets of Johannesburg working as street hairstylists. The series exposes hardworking women who execute artistry daily in the form of hairstyles but whose contribution to street culture is often overlooked.

 

Wozi Sisi explores how these street hairstylists work, negotiate, navigate and shape the complex demarcated trading zone. Showing the often overlooked business side of these women; Dahlia’s images aim to tell of how the women are placed in groups and have a block leader who makes sure they adhere to the informal street trading by-laws of the city of Johannesburg; how they form a network of service providers sharing ideas and skills; attract and maintain a clientele; and produce value at a minimal cost while dealing with firm competition. Dahlia hopes to give us a broader view of these women’s lives beyond their mobile studio comprising of a chair, marketing boards depicting types of hairstyles they can execute and their call to potential clients –“woza sisi, woza uzobona, woza nice”.

 

In a collaboration with DOPEstore, Woza Sisi will be shown as part of a series of cultural events hosted monthly at the concept store to develop visual arts. DOPEstore will be working with different creatives in the fields of art, fashion and music. The photography exhibition will also launch Woza Sisi merchandise to be revealed on the opening night, which will be available at the store throughout the duration of the exhibition.

 

maubanedahlia.wix.com/portfolio

 

Woza Sisi opens on Thursday 5 March at DOPEstore, 95 Commissioner Street, Marshalltown, Johannesburg.

 

©dahliamaubane_wozasisi008 ©dahliamaubane_wozasisi005 ©dahliamaubane_wozasisi006 ©dahliamaubane_wozasisi009 ©dahliamaubane_wozasisi004 ©dahliamaubane_wozasisi011 ©dahliamaubane_wozasisi012©Dahlia Maubane_From the series Woza Sisi_2014_01 ©Dahlia Maubane_From the series Woza Sisi_2014_06 ©Dahlia Maubane_From the series Woza Sisi_2014_11 ©Dahlia Maubane_From the series Woza Sisi_2014_08

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Design Indaba 2015’s Cut ‘n Paste Paper Branding by The Jupiter Drawing Room]]> http://10and5.com/?p=102950 2015-03-03T11:39:31Z 2015-03-03T12:00:40Z

The Jupiter Drawing Room tore, folded and glued brightly coloured pieces of paper together to create the striking branding for Design Indaba 2015.

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Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

 

The theme for the 2015 Design Indaba festival was Make. Change., a bold call to action encouraging their audience to take matters into their own hands to help someone or change something for the better. The branding for this campaign by The Jupiter Drawing Room was just as striking. In keeping with the message of the campaign, the Jupiter team stepped away from their computers to make the collateral entirely by hand. The imagery needed to appear simple and charming but considered. So, in the 5 months leading up to the conference, the Jupiter team tore, folded and glued pieces of paper together to create faces, buildings, backdrops, props and more. These were then used to create the meticulously detailed images and animations we saw before and during the 2015 Design Indaba festival.

 

Joanne Thomas, Executive Creative Director of Design at Jupiter, explains: “We wanted to keep it as simple as possible for people to go out there and #MAKECHANGE. So we chose paper as the base to bring our visuals to life and gave the campaign a very ‘hands on’ feel – it’s an unintimidating material and accessible to everyone. By using paper, you get the impression that the illustrations were created on someone’s desk somewhere – which they were… by hand, in our office.”

 

Leading up to the Design Indaba festival the Jupiter team created an animated TV ad to spread the message of the Make. Change. campaign. They also created print ads to introduce the people who are already making an impact. One example being Jo Maxwell and her fellow Red Hat Renegades who recycle old newspapers to create sleeping bags for the homeless. This ad appeared in the Sunday Times alongside a guide showing readers how their weekend paper could keep someone warm. They also hand made the animated speaker portraits which were used during the 2015 Design Indaba conference. These were then brought to life through interactive speaker plinths, where delegates were able to pose for a photo with a paper version of each of the speakers.

 

Credits:

 

Joanne Thomas | Executive Creative Director – Design

Carla Kreuser | Creative Director

Kate Royce | Copywriter

Robert Prinsloo | Art Director

Altus Brand | Multimedia Design

Alison Pegg | Project Manager

Vuyokazi Jonas | Project Manager

Gareth Skibbe, Haydn Fairman and Ernestine Daniels | Retouching and DTP

Sarah Gregg-MacDonald | Design Intern

 

See more work by The Jupiter Drawing Room on their website.

 

More about Design Indaba 2015, including Field Notes from the conference and the 10 African Speakers on African Creativity.

 

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

Design Indaba 'Make.Change.'

 

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