Between 10 and 5 The South African creative showcase 2015-01-31T20:07:14Z http://10and5.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Oh Wow! – Yes In French, an African Tale and Pictures of a Desert in Bloom.]]> http://10and5.com/?p=99238 2015-01-30T13:45:33Z 2015-01-30T13:02:40Z

A wonderfully illustrated African tale, some saturated images of Namaqualand during flower season and a whole lot of new music.

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Once again, it’s time to share our weekly wow’s with you and today we’ve got a wonderfully illustrated African tale, some saturated images of Namaqualand during flower season, DIY Adventure Time themed coasters and a whole lot of new music including a debut EP, a mix and two singles.

 

ONE – ‘Avarice’, an illustration by Amber Smith based on the African tale Umveli and The Bird.

 

Avarice by Amber Smith

 

TWOHeroine (a four piece all-girl band from Somerset West) released their debut EP, ‘Milk‘.

 

Heroine - Milk

 

 

THREECaroline Mackintosh photographed Genevieve Howard for Sneaky while in Amsterdam last year.

 

Caroline Mackintosh for Sneaky mag (1)

Caroline Mackintosh for Sneaky mag (2)

Caroline Mackintosh for Sneaky mag (3)

Caroline Mackintosh for Sneaky mag (4)

Caroline Mackintosh for Sneaky mag (5)

 

FOURGateway Drugs released a new single from their upcoming album, ‘Dare Tonight‘.

 

Gateway Drugs - 'Dare Tonight'

 

 

FIVE – Street artist Sonny painted a Transkei Cheetah mural in the rural village of Mdumbi over the holidays.

 

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Read an interview with Sonny.

 

SIXFrancois Visser photographed the flowering desert of Namaqualand for The Plant, featured with a Q&A on It’s Nice That.

 

Francois Visser (1)

Francois Visser (3)

Francois Visser (4)

Francois Visser (5)

Francois Visser (7)

 

SEVENMaramza dropped a new mix, ‘Changez‘, via naas.

 

Maramza_Changez_BLK

 

 

EIGHTA new summer season vinyl façade for 109 Hatfield office space occupied by SAOTA, Antoni Associates and OKHA Interiors.

 

109 Hatfield Summer Season Façade (1)

109 Hatfield Summer Season Façade (2)

109 Hatfield Summer Season Façade (3)

109 Hatfield Summer Season Façade (4)

 

NINE – DIY Adventure Time coasters by Christi du Toit. Download the PDF and find the crafting instructions here.

 

Christi du Toit - Adventure Time (1)

Christi du Toit - Adventure Time (3)

Christi du Toit - Adventure Time (2)

Christi du Toit - Adventure Time (4)

 

TENYes In French released their first single, ‘Hott Mess‘. Photo by Kent Andreasen.

 

Yes In French

 

 

 

More Oh Wow!

 

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Sune Vosloo <![CDATA[Not Your Average Postcard | Curious Details of Southeast Asia captured by Tao Farren-Hefer]]> http://10and5.com/?p=99214 2015-01-30T11:03:20Z 2015-01-30T11:00:19Z

Photographer Tao Farren-Hefer takes us on the back roads of Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia in his latest series of 35mm film photographs.

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Tao Farren-Hefer

 

Trust photographer Tao Farren-Hefer to turn visa troubles into art. While shooting and editing on contract in Bangkok, Thailand last year, Tao had to leave the country once a month in order to renew his visa. These monthly missions turned out to be blessings in disguise when Tao decided to pack his camera. He captured moments of his travels in Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia, and what started out as an unplanned project, resulted in a successful series of images.

 

Tao, a surfer and lover of the ocean, is inspired by and often photographs this favourite place of his. Last year, Tao produced compelling film photographs of Cape Town’s beaches and surrounds in an exclusive photo essay for Between 10and5. The ocean naturally features in his latest work, but images of people, peculiar details and the overlapping of urban and natural environments also form part of this curious collection.

 

Even with their bright colours and exotic setting, Tao’s images do not in the least resemble idealized post cards or holiday snapshots. His often-unconventional point of view takes us on the back roads of these idyllic destinations and shows us some genuine (and sometimes even dystopic) scenes.

 

Tao, who shoots predominantly in film, had the following to say about his process:

I find most photographers are obsessed with gear and it’s easy to fall into the trap of taking a lot of gear and over-analysing every possible shot, so I decided to challenge myself, only taking along a 35mm film camera, a 50mm lens and several rolls of film. Not having as many options as usual, I was allowed to enjoy my surroundings, experiencing the travel more thoroughly.

 

Tao graduated from AFDA in 2013 with the Best Cinematography award. With his filmmaking and photography background, his future plans include heading up the film and photography department at Solar Station Design (a creative design company that focuses on the international action sports industry), starting a personal documentary project and squeezing in collaborations and other freelance work in the fashion industry.

 

See more of Tao’s featured work.

Follow his work on his website, Tumblr and Instagram.

 

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

Tao Farren-Hefer

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[The NEST | A Membership Programme for Young African Creatives]]> http://10and5.com/?p=99139 2015-01-30T09:09:30Z 2015-01-30T09:30:56Z

Along with a beta version of their new website this week, Creative Nestlings has launched The NEST: a premium membership programme for young African creatives.

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Along with a beta version of their new website this week, Creative Nestlings has launched The NEST: a premium membership programme for young African creatives.

 

Noting that, for the past three years, they’ve worked closely with young creatives across SA and the rest of the continent, Creative Nestlings co-founder Dillion Phiri outlines the aim of the new site and the membership programme as resourceful platforms that will support development in the industry.

 

Creative Nestlings’ new website has been in the making for quite some time now and, intended to function as a “field guide” to the African continent, it speaks of their core mission. A signigicant part of this is The NEST, which takes the form of a paid-for membership programme for African creatives between the ages of 18-30. Being part of this online network puts members in touch with other young creatives, provides them with opportunities to collaborate, and it makes business mentorships, perks and discounts from partners available. Members of The NEST are also eligible to participate in the Inagural Nestlings Awards and will be granted access to select events, publications as well as co-working spaces in Johannesburg and Cape Town later in 2015. Exciting stuff! We’ll be keeping a close eye on this and we can’t wait to see how it unfolds.

 

To find out more about The NEST or to sign up (membership costs R500 per annum) visit www.creativenestlings.com/network

 

The Nest 2

Creative Nestlings - The NEST

 

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Sune Vosloo <![CDATA[Fresh Art From Africa | That Art Fair Launches in Cape Town 2015]]> http://10and5.com/?p=98780 2015-01-30T09:05:19Z 2015-01-30T09:05:19Z

That Art Fair, launching for the first time in February of this year, stands firm and proud in its position as an artist’s art fair.

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That Art Fair

 

 

That Art Fair is an art fair for artists.

 

Before you think that I’m stating the absolute obvious, let’s not forget that many art fairs have evolved into large scale exhibition and commercial opportunities for established galleries and the artists they represent. It is for this reason that That Art Fair, launching for the first time in February of this year, stands firm and proud in its position as an artist’s art fair.

 

An ARTsouthAfrica initiative, That Art Fair runs in conjunction with Design Indaba and Cape Town Art Fair from 27 February to 1 March 2015. Artists, artist collectives and organisations that support artists will be given the opportunity to represent themselves while any participating galleries are reminded that their focus is to stay strictly on the artists they represent. In this way, That Art Fair aims to be an “affordable art fair event providing a platform for African artists who work under the radar of the traditional art establishment and who do things a little differently.”

 

With their by-line, “Fresh Art from Africa”, That Art Fair is focused on recognizing, nurturing and investing in emerging local talent. With different art patrons, media partners and art world ambassadors, their aim is to aid transformation in the contemporary African art scene by helping young artists gain exposure.

 

That Art Fair

 

 

Submissions:

Applications to exhibit at That Art Fair close on 3 February 2015.

Apply here.

 

 

Exhibitions:

A full That Art Fair program is still to be released.

Exhibitions to look forward to will include:

  • Future Masters
  • Comic Art exhibition by ComicArtAfrica, curated by Andrew Lamprecht & Moray Rhoda
  • Photography by Snapped magazine
  • An exhibition by SKATTIE focusing on the cross over between fashion, art and culture.
  • Urban Art exhibitions and live art events by street artists
  • Art for Change – art dedicated to social change
  • Art superMart – an art and design pop up shop
  • Soap Box – Culture Medium, an interactive art piece by Jacques Coetzer, will allow the public to speak their mind about the art world.
  • Art Fair Salon – That Art Fair supports artists with limited means by representing them in this curated selection of submitted artworks
  • Film Screenings
  • That Art Party (in association with SKATTIE) – an opportunity for artists and exhibitors to let their hair down in celebration of SA talent

 

Culture Medium

Culture Medium by Jacques Coetzer

 

Dates and Times:

Friday 27 Feb: 12h00 – 21h00

Saturday 28 Feb: 12h00 – 21h00

Sunday 1 March: 12h00 – 18h00

That Art Party: Saturday 28 Feb: 18h00 – 00h00

 

 

Location:

121 Cecil Road, Salt River, Cape Town

 

That Art Fair Location

 

 

Tickets:

That Art Fair

1 Day Pass (Online purchases only): R50

1 Day Pass (At the door): R70

1 Day Student Pass (At the door only – student card required): R30

Full Weekend Pass (Online purchases only): R100

Full Weekend Pass (At the door): R120

Bulk ticket purchases, 14 x 1 day passes (online only): R500

 

That Art Party

(Saturday from 6PM Only)

1 Pass (At the door): R50

1 Party Pass + 1 Art Fair Pass (Online purchases only): R80

1 Party Pass + 1 Art Fair Pass (At the door): R100

 

Buy tickets to That Art Fair.

 

For more info:

Visit thatartfair.com or like them on Facebook.

 

That Art Fair

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[‘Bang Bang Mix’ | A Comedy of Errors in Chicken Licken’s New TVC]]> http://10and5.com/?p=99147 2015-01-30T08:07:31Z 2015-01-30T08:07:31Z

As disaster unfolds when a group of office workers compare their misleading R15 purchases, one man finds the sweet spot with a meal from Chicken Licken.

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There isn’t much you can buy with R15 these days, but it can score you a meal from Chicken Licken – a fact which Net#work BBDO have created a rather hilarious commercial to illustrate.

 

The TV ad is a madcap comedy that made its way onto screens nationwide this week. It opens with a group of dour-looking office workers comparing the bargains they’ve bought for R15. The items range from an antique mug (read: old and fragile), a pair of “fireproof” shoes that turn out to be regular and highly flammable gumboots, and an unsuccesful assasination attempt on the boss. Meanwhile, as the sum of these disastrous purchases amounts in chaos, one man finds the sweet spot as he tucks into a R15 BangBang meal from Chicken Licken.

 

Credits:

 

Agency: Net#work BBDO
Executive Creative Director: Mike Schalit
Creative Directors: Brent Singer and Jenny Glover
Head of TV: Caroline Switala
Agency art director: Heidi Kasselman
Copywriter: Saf Sindhi
Production Company: Velocity CPT
Director: Greg Gray
Producer: Helena Woodfine
Exec Producer: Nicola Valentine
Director of Photography: Paul Gilpin
Production Art Director: Chris Bass
Editor & Company: Deliverance / Ricky Boyd
Post Production Online: Blade
Post Production Offline : Deliverance / Ricky Boyd

 

Chicken Licken 'Bang Bang Mix' (1)

Chicken Licken 'Bang Bang Mix' (2)

Chicken Licken 'Bang Bang Mix' (4)

Chicken Licken 'Bang Bang Mix' (3)

Chicken Licken 'Bang Bang Mix' (5)

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Fresh Meat: Carla Saunders]]> http://10and5.com/?p=99083 2015-01-29T12:59:54Z 2015-01-29T12:59:54Z

Greenside Design Centre grad Carla Saunders is driven to challenge our perceptions and pre-conceived ideas with a conceptually rooted approach to design.

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Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 7

 

Carla Saunders is a Johannesburg-based graphic designer, graduated from the Greenside Design Center College of Design. Images are her language and through these, she is driven to challenge our perceptions and preconcieved ideas with a conceptually rooted approach. We caught up with her for our yearly grad series to learn more about her thoughts on design, the project she’s most proud of to date and what she’s got planned for the year (and years) ahead.

 

How and why did you become interested in graphic design?

 

The reason the design field appeals to me is predominantly because of the communication aspect. Imagery is a language on its own and it affects our perceptions and understanding of things. This is something I am quite happy to be involved in.

 

What do you enjoy, or alternatively dislike, about it?

 

A dislike about the industry is how it has lost a lot of its integrity. It has become commercial and people have abandoned their passion for great design and valuable communication. As the First Things First manifesto, which was a call to action for a different approach to design, stated about the issue:

 

“Designers who devote their efforts primarily to advertising, marketing and brand development are supporting, and implicitly endorsing, a mental environment so saturated with commercial messages that it is changing the very way citizen-consumers speak, think, feel, respond and interact. To some extent we are all helping draft a reductive and immeasurably harmful code of public discourse.”

 

How would you describe your style, and what influences it?

 

My designs are influenced by an idea or commentary that usually takes a socially critical approach, and that is followed by research coupled with a concept that will give the execution direction.

 

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 6

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 8

 

What is your design philosophy? Or, what principles do you always work according to when designing?

 

Design communicates, therefore it’s such a powerful medium in which to relay information or an idea. What I aim to do with design is to attack and deconstruct harmful and sinister ideologies such as poverty and class, and to help society see the reality behind mere construct from a heteronormative system.

 

Was studying at the Greenside Design Center what you expected it to be? Has your perception of the field changed since your first year? And if so, how?

 

I enjoyed my time at GDC immensely. I doubt I would have evolved into the type of designer I am in a different environment, my exposure to great designers and taking a responsible approach to design is something I’m lucky for. My perception definitely changed in my second year, the possibilities of what can be done by designers became expansive and awe-inspiring.

 

What’s the best piece of advice you received while studying?

 

The best piece of advice was from my honours lecturer Robin Turner. Because of the commercial nature of the industry it becomes a common thing for aspiring designers to lose the fire in their belly about ideals and practice for change. He encouraged that one should not kill the flame, to hold on to it, because one day you could be in the position of opposing the norm, within your own studio for example.

 

Your approach comes across as being conceptually driven. Are aesthetics ever a starting point for you, or would you say this is secondary?

 

I believe form follows function, I do designs that just look beautiful but that can be compared with someone drawing out a doodle whilst talking on the phone. I believe a whole design becomes superficial and flimsy if it lacks a good strong conceptual foundation.

 

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 5

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 9

 

What is it that attracts you to editorial design specifically?

 

I think it’s a personal talent that evolved into a loved interest. I place great value in a publication design that is copy heavy, yet the designer found a way to make it simple, easy, engaging and an interesting process for the reader.

 

Which of your creative projects are you most proud of?

 

That’s a hard one. The one I found quite challenging, satisfying and enjoyable is the ‘Everything About Nothing’ project. It was formed to answer a brief from the ISTD (International Society of Typography Designers) – they launch yearly briefs for students to respond to, which are then judged on their typographical excellence and awarded membership into the society. What my project aimed to counteract or comment on was the general apathy felt by society.

 

This made me write out a narrative that was like a person having a late night existential musing over what the term ‘nothing’ means. Spaces in which the term ‘nothing’ relates were explored: like the execution being digital as it will occur in an intangible virtual space. Also, because the end result of the narrative is that nothing never means nothing, it always means something – if not everything – this digital output, which ended up being a 13m long continuous landscape orientated jpeg, was faxed through an old fax machine on a roll of thermal paper, so it ended up being a 13 m long fax. I used a fax machine because it has become a redundant technology in the traditional sense in South Africa, and because it prints through heat activating chemicals that are coated over the paper and they turn black. The paper however continues to react to heat and things like UV light so the text will fade away and the paper will go blank over time.

 

Coming up with the typographical output and design was an interesting venture within itself. I played around with the idea that without light we can’t see anything like colour or without looking we can’t tell one surface from another with no perspective. Therefore I decided to use light projections of my typography designs and interfere the light with substrates to alter or distort the appearance, capturing a different truth, that which is usually unseen.

 

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 4

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 1

 

What are your plans for 2015 and beyond?

 

To gain experience within my industry, get to know the field and how it works. My long term goal is to eventually start a tertiary institution that focuses on implementing and teaching critical design that will better society instead of viewing it as a consumer or “ism” group, along with a studio that will hopefully grow into an organisation that will give substance, support, research and guidance on how to build a socially critical method of designing.

 

Where can we stay updated with your work?

 

On my Behance profile. Keep a lookout for a few secret projects which I’ll hopefully be launching this year.

 

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 10

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 12

Carla Saunders - 'Nothing' 11

 

Publication design, ‘We Are the Hollow Men':

 

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 1

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 2

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 3

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 4

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 5

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 6

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 7

Carla Saunders - 'We Are The Hollow Men' 8

 

‘What is this Place’, a series of design executions used to convey that an aesthetic pleasure can be found in that which is broken:

 

Carla Saunders - what is this place 1

Carla Saunders - what is this place 2

Carla Saunders - what is this place 3

Carla Saunders - what is this place 4

Carla Saunders - what is this place 5

Carla Saunders - what is this place 7

 

Publication design for an critical theory academic paper by Lindi Maritz:

 

Carla Saunders - publication design 1

Carla Saunders - publication design 2

Carla Saunders - publication design 3

Carla Saunders - publication design 4

Carla Saunders - publication design 5

 

 

More FRESH MEAT!

 

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Sune Vosloo <![CDATA[Magic Worlds for Every Mood by Diorama Artist Flagg]]> http://10and5.com/?p=99033 2015-01-30T06:18:22Z 2015-01-29T11:00:29Z

Cape Town based artist Flagg gives new voice to found objects through her magical handmade dioramas.

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Flagg

there’s nothing under the bed i checked… #2

 

 

A leaky-roofed garage in Cape Town, filled to the brim with old household electronics, broken childhood toys and flea-market oddities is where you’ll find artist Flagg at work. Here she gives new voice to found objects through her magical handmade dioramas. Flagg describes herself as always having had a “weakness for the humorous and macabre” and you’re sure to find both elements in her unconventional new worlds – have a look!

 

Flagg encountered her first diorama at the age of four. The small white poodle in a glass house was a relic from her mother’s childhood. About her fascination with dioramas she says,

 

 I fell in love with the concept of “looking in”.  In retrospect my interest in the diorama could have been fueled by pure frustration of not being able to actually get to the poodle, though as I got older I started to realise that even though the scene behind the glass never changed, my feeling towards the object often did.  That’s what I love about dioramas. They are timeless, static scenes that change with our moods and that are brought to life by the power of our imaginations.

 

Flagg created her first (quite rustic) diorama on the morning of her very first exhibition. Although the exhibition was of her illustrations and prints, it was the new diorama that excited her most and she’s been addicted to making them ever since.

 

“There’s something liberating about taking an object that you would usually just vacuum up off the living-room floor and making it the centre of attention,” says Flagg who builds her dioramas by repurposing whatever she can find lying around in her studio or the bottom of her drawers. The new worlds take form inside old discarded objects and, more recently, hand made boxes. Flagg gives herself creative freedom. Her final works depend on her mood and whatever objects are in the vicinity. This makes for excitement, surprise and less inhibiting expectations when it comes to the final product.

 

About what inspires her, Flagg says, “My initial inspiration for a diorama often comes from something that someone has said to me in casual conversation. I find that people are a great, untapped well of ridiculous one-liners.”  The angles, colours and clumsiness of 70s and 80s design, as well as her considerable plastic figurine collection, are also sources of constant inspiration.

 

The dioramas became functional pieces when Flagg started to add wiring and lights. The new shadows and highlights created by the light strips lend three dimensionality to the scenes. “Since I felt so ‘locked out’ of that first diorama that my mom had given me, I have created a way for the viewer to assert their presence by turning my dioramas into functional art pieces,” says Flagg.

 

If you are as charmed as we are by Flagg’s miniature worlds, be sure to look out for her upcoming projects: she is working on large sculptures for an experimental dance project that will debut at Infecting The City in Cape Town in March. The sculptures are a development of the work she did for The Line & Light Dance Collective in 2014 when she was commissioned to create objects that will challenge the movement of both the dancers and their audience. More large dioramas are also in the works and will be displayed at a KIN launch in April.

 

Visit flaggmakesart.com and like her Facebook page to view more work and read the weird and wonderful stories behind the diorama characters.

 

Flagg

there’s nothing under the bed…

Flagg

the weight of love…

Flagg

the weight of love…

Flagg

dear susan, i’m sorry…

Flagg

that patch on your jeans, well it irritates me…

Flagg

that niggly feeling…

Flagg

that niggly feeling…

Flagg

we are siamese…

Flagg

the best in his field…

Flagg

summertime puts you back on my mind…

Flagg

summertime puts you back on my mind…

Flagg

the saddest drinks ever…

Flagg

red leather jacket weather…

Flagg

sometimes i like to spend time on my own…

Flagg

so i spilled…

Flagg

so i spilled…

Flagg

hugh, the manatee…

Flagg

hugh, the manatee…

Flagg

i hate the beach…

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[#NowPlaying: ‘Teen Magazine’ by Katja Marr]]> http://10and5.com/?p=98975 2015-01-29T15:42:37Z 2015-01-29T10:30:59Z

Teen Magazine is the title of this #NowPlaying made by photographer Katja Marr, and you'd be right to assume that it's fantastically nostalgic.

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http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-image32470022

 

‘Teen Magazine’ is the title of today’s #NowPlaying made by Cape Town based photographer Katja Marr, and you’d be right to assume that it’s fantastically nostalgic. Filled with the swoon-worthy-ness of Gwen Stefani, Destiny’s Child and Kylie Minogue, Katja’s playlist is the stuff of teenage dreams. It’s even got the Macarena! Needless to say, the whole thing is pretty impossible not to sing along to.

 

See Katja’s work at www.katjamarr.com and follow her on Twitter, tumblr and Instagram for more.

 

 

Tracklist:

 

  1. Cool by Gwen Stefani from ‘Love. Angel. Music. Baby.’
  2. Me & U by Cassie from ‘Cassie’
  3. Stuck by Stacie Orrico from ‘Stacie Orrico’
  4. Stop by Spice Girls from ‘Spiceworld’
  5. Independent Woman (Part 1) by Destiny’s Child from ‘Survivor’
  6. Who Let the Dogs Out by Baha Men from ‘Who Let the Dogs Out’
  7. Get the Party Started by P!NK from ‘M!ssundaztood’
  8. Spinning Around by Kylie Minogue from ‘Light Years’
  9. Mambo No. 5 by Lou Bega from ‘A Little Bit of Mambo’
  10. Macarena by Los Del Rio (Bayside Boys Mix) from ‘A mí me gusta’
  11. 1,2 Step by Ciara from ‘Goodies’
  12. AM to PM by Christina Milian from ‘Christina Milian’
  13. Can’t Hold Us Down by Christina Aguilera from ‘Stripped’
  14. Let Me Blow Ya Mind by Eve (ft. Gwen Stefani) from ‘Scorpion’

 

Browse our archives for previous versions of #NowPlaying, or find the playlists directly on 8tracks.

 

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Sune Vosloo <![CDATA[“Unwrap The (Very Sweet) Story” of the new Cadbury P.S. Commercial]]> http://10and5.com/?p=98993 2015-01-29T09:44:28Z 2015-01-29T09:40:07Z

In the latest TVC for Cadbury P.S. by Ogilvy & Mather Johannesburg, director Keith Rose sensitively illustrates the story of friends Lindi and Khanyi. Viewers are urged to further “Unwrap The Story".

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Friendships aren’t always smooth sailing, but there’s no doubt that the stories behind these ups and downs make them worthwhile. In the latest TVC for Cadbury P.S. by Ogilvy & Mather Johannesburg, director Keith Rose sensitively illustrates the story of friends Lindi and Khanyi. Viewers are urged to further “Unwrap The Story” that lies behind Lindi and Khanyi’s friendship through an extension of the campaign on Facebook.

 

The commercial opens with an emotional blow up between the two friends, portrayed by the talented young actresses Nonku Lukoma and Vanessa Gagu. We go on to follow the young women who, after Khanyi storms off during the fight, reminisce about their years of friendship in a series of vibrant flashbacks. The final scene shows Khanyi returning to her friend revealing a P.S bar with the message “I’m sorry” on it – a resolution provided by Cadbury P.S.

 

According to Tracy-Lynn King, Creative Group Head at Ogilvy (Copywriter), “This commercial follows on from the previous, successful ad in the ‘There’s a story behind every P.S.’ series.” Georja Bunger, Creative Group Head (Art Director) at Ogilvy, further explains, “While the previous ad was a love story, this commercial focuses on two best friends who have a fall-out. We wanted to do something that was brave for a chocolate brand, but also felt very sincere and captured what Cadbury P.S. is all about; which is real, human connections,”

 

Velocity Films’ Keith Rose directed the commercial. Keith is the Loerie Hall of Fame’s most recent inductee and has produced globally acclaimed films that are rumoured to emanate from his obsession with his craft. He says, “The soft music in the commercial projects the feeling of tranquility and it is a great counterpoint to the aggressive performances that followed.” The actresses received acting lessons, but were also allowed the freedom to personalize their characters as best suited them during the shoot.

 

Viewers left intrigued by the story behind Lindi and Khanyi’s friendship can find out more on Cadbury P.S.’s Facebook page where they’re invited to “Unwrap The Story” as part of an integrated online campaign. By unravelling daily clues on the girls’ identities, the reason for their fight and their final reconciliation, participants stand the chance to win a shopping experience for themselves and 3 best friends. The competition kicks off immediately, so have a look here.

 

Credits:

 

Executive Creative Director – Mariana O’Kelly
Creative Director – Peter Little
Creative Group Head (Copywriter) – Tracey-Lynn King
Creative Group Head (Art Director) – Georja Bunger
Business Director – Bridget Christensen
Account Director – Greg Pfuhl
Head TV Production – Debbie Dannheisser
Production company – Velocity
Director – Keith Rose
Executive Producer – Peter Carr
Director of Photography – Eugenio Galli
Production Art Director – Elmi Badenhorst
Editor and Company – Saki at Left Post Production
Visual Effects Company – Searle Street Post / Udesh Chetty and Graeme Armstrong
Music Company/Composer/Sound –  Hatt & Mosley / Music Production / String & Tins / Frequency
Post Production Online – Searle Street Post Production
Post Production Offline – Left Post Production

 

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

Cadbury PS

 

The post “Unwrap The (Very Sweet) Story” of the new Cadbury P.S. Commercial appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Alix-Rose Cowie <![CDATA[A Conversation on SA Street Wear Now | Part 3 | The Store Owners]]> http://10and5.com/?p=98459 2015-01-29T09:02:05Z 2015-01-29T09:02:05Z

For our third and final instalment we're catching up with the founders of local street wear stores Boaston Society, Thesis Lifestyle and astore.

The post A Conversation on SA Street Wear Now | Part 3 | The Store Owners appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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adidas Superstar

 

adidas Originals has relaunched the classic Superstar with a global campaign that will challenge the definition of ‘superstardom’ throughout 2015. Alongside the campaign we’re having a conversation with South Africans who know the street wear scene inside out and sharing their insights and comments on the scene that the iconic sneaker is returning to.

 

In Part 1 we spoke with street style photographer Trevor Stuurman, youth engagement strategist Andile Mbete and stylist Boogy Maboi. In Part 2 we spoke with South African street wear designers Mathew Kieser of SOL-SOL menswear, Cherize Ross of K-WORD, and Daniel Sher of me.plus.one.

 

For our third and final instalment we’re catching up with the founders of local street wear stores Boaston Society, Thesis Lifestyle and astoreisgood.

 

Elisha Mpofu is the owner and Creative Director of Boaston Society, a youth lifestyle boutique based on Long Street in Cape Town. The clothing store stocks numerous local brands alongside international favourites.

 

Wandile Zondo co-founded the Thesis Lifestyle Store on Youth Day in 2007 to mark a new revolution for the youth of Soweto. The majority of the store’s merchandise is locally designed, including their own Thesis label. Look out for the second Thesis Lifestyle Store set to launch in March.

 

Dario Leite is the co-founder and owner of astoreisgood, a contemporary lifestyle and culture store stocking the latest apparel, footwear, accessories and books on Kloof Street in Cape Town.

 

What excites you about street wear?

 

Elisha: Street wear is always changing, not boxed by some strict industry guidelines, fashion shows and all that other stuff that limits creativity and self expression. Street wear is that art that you and your friends engage with on the street corners, at school, skating in the streets or engaging in cyphers with other hip hop heads. So what excites me about being in this industry is knowing that people can make a living doing what they do every day – living their life. Talking about street wear from an economic context, it has allowed youth to create an industry and jobs for themselves, something which is currently lacking in the country right now.

 

Wandile: The fact that it’s still new in SA and there is a lot of room for local brands to grow.

 

Dario: I’m really looking forward to seeing more street wear from our local designers and particularly young designers. I think the diversity of our nation and particularly the youth, who disregard previous boundaries, is something to look forward to. I can see South Africa becoming a great spot for street wear inspiration, if it isn’t already!

 

 

astore

astoreisgood

 

Why did you decide to open a street wear store in South Africa? And how did you go about doing so?

 

 

Elisha: I started in 2012 and the idea was to create an online platform for local and international street wear brands. One year into my research and trying to implement the idea I decided to go ahead and open a brick and mortar space because e-commerce was not yet ready for street fashion. The idea just grew from then and I’ve not looked back ever since.

 

Wandile: South Africa has a few street wear stores and we saw an opportunity to start and grow our brand, as way of expressing ourselves. It started as hobby by buying second hand clothes. From that we evolved to start our brand. From the brand we decided to create a space where the brand could interact with the consumer and Thesis Lifestyle was born.

 

Dario: We opened our store because we felt that street wear was not being accurately represented in the country. We got together with some friends who all shared a love for fashion, design, art and music and opened the store together.

 

Boaston Society

Boaston Society

 

What do you look for when deciding to stock a new brand?

 

Elisha: We look for excitement and commitment of the founders or owners. If it doesn’t excite us then there is no point in trying to pretend. However we also factor in things like the brand’s points of difference, their positioning, history and all that because all brands come with a story and we always want to tell good, original stories.

 

Wandile: We look for what the brand stands for and we only stock brands that we would wear as well.

 

Dario: Can I see myself wearing this? If I’m comfortable wearing it then it will feel more genuine and this rubs off on our customers.

 

Thesis store

Thesis Lifestyle

 

The adidas street style staple, the Superstar, is back in a big way in 2015. What else will we be seeing on the streets this year?

 

Elisha: The Superstar is back in a big way which is exciting. I have always been a fan of the silhouette together with the Stan Smith. From last year’s nice line up of Stan Smiths into this year’s Superstar line up things are getting exciting. I think the Tubular is going to have a big year too. Many people were excited about it from day one and I am sure adidas has great plans for it. Retro kicks are still dominating the scene so I would still like a couple more retros.

 

Wandile: I see commuter cycling growing and that will have an impact on commuter gear.

 

Dario: adidas have some exciting product in this year’s collection. Really looking forward to what Kanye West has in mind for his new partnership with adidas and Pharrell has already showed his hand with his take on the Stan Smith.

 

What trends in art and design (or vice versa) have you noticed being translated into street fashion?

 

Elisha: Architecture has played a major part in shaping street fashion. Clean minimal designs, high fashion meets street style. Art will still play a big part so I expect to see more fashion designers collaborating with mainstream artists.

 

Wandile: I never follow trends but I am always inspired by different artists; Atang Tshikare is a good example with that, and Lazi Mathebula.

 

Dario: Street wear is a co-optive phenomena and certainly art and design are seasonal victims of how street wear borrows and morphs from other creative movements. Whether it’s an appropriation of 80s skate board graphics, Disney characters or classic paintings, street wear takes it all and produces its own versions.

 

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The 2015 adidas Originals Superstar campaign aims to redefine ‘superstardom’ as creative courage in a move away from celebrity worship and external validation. What young South African creatives epitomise this definition for you?

 

Elisha: The whole Boaston Society team epitomises this definition by just sticking to what we do without necessarily seeking co-signs or Instagram influence. We promote street wear, brands, artists and designers in our store and do so with total belief in all the people we work with. There are also other people doing amazing work, just from the top of my head:

 

Dillion Phiri from Creativity Nestlings. He is pushing creativity in Cape Town and South Africa with no specific aim of being famous. His work with young people all over the country speaks for itself because he has connected a lot of creatives.

 

Petite Noir is one of the best artists to come out of the country. He is not trying to fit into the entertainment industry but is making good music, achieving way more than a lot of artists celebrated today.

 

Mpumelelo Frypan Mfula – check him out on RHTC Online – is a young ambitious dude with a passion for street culture. A student of the streets, he is now becoming a teacher in the streets.

 

More people check to out are Vincent Manzini, Jermaine Charles, Mpho Makua and the Stylagang Crew.

 

Wandile: Wanda Lephoto, Kabelo Kungwane, Lazi Mathebula and Computa (he always does the store interior at Thesis).

 

Dario: I’m really fortunate to know of a few! Ben Johnson (Designer), Kope Figgins (photographers), Anees Petersen (Young&Lazy), Matt Keiser (Sol-Sol), Smiso Zwane (Okmalumkoolkat) are all doing wonderful things.

 

 

Read Part 1 and Part 2Find out about the making of the campaign.

 

twitter.com/adidasza

instagram.com/adidasza

 

adidas Superstar

 

adidas Originals Superstar Vintage Deluxe available at adidas Originals stores.

 

 

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