Between 10 and 5 The South African creative showcase 2014-11-21T12:42:55Z http://10and5.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Alix-Rose Cowie <![CDATA[Ads This Week: Not Kak Ideas, A Young Movie Maker and Africa As One]]> http://10and5.com/?p=92380 2014-11-21T12:42:55Z 2014-11-21T12:42:55Z

In Ads This Week we're watching "inventors" Shadrack & Gary's web series - a hilarious and clever way to create awareness about Enviro Loo by Xfacta and Team Best; listening to radio ads by M&C Saatchi Abel attempting to inspire us back to the gym; meeting an adorable young filmmaker in an ad by Ireland Davenport for Vodacom's ICT Centres; and following the journey of a DHL rugby ball making its way through Africa in a campaign by 7 Different Kinds of smoke (7DKS).

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In Ads This Week we’re watching “inventors” Shadrack & Gary’s web series – a hilarious and clever way to create awareness about Enviro Loo by Xfacta and Team Best; listening to radio ads by M&C Saatchi Abel attempting to inspire us back to the gym; meeting an adorable young filmmaker in an ad by Ireland Davenport for Vodacom’s ICT Centres; and following the journey of a DHL rugby ball making its way through Africa in a campaign by 7 Different Kinds of smoke (7DKS).

 

‘Not Kak Ideas’ brought to you by the Best Kak Idea: Enviro Loo

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

In support of raising awareness for World Toilet Day 2014 on the 19th of November, Enviro Loo, an affordable waterless-sanitation system, proudly presents ‘Not Kak Ideas’ with Shadrack & Gary. The idea behind ‘Not Kak Ideas’ was to use the inherent ‘awkwardness’ associated with sanitation in a fun and cheeky approach to help educate the general public on the role Enviro Loo serves in tackling the global sanitation crisis. Rather than shying away from the topic, Enviro Loo proudly manages people’s waste and happily positions itself as the ‘Best Kak Idea’ out there.

 

The campaign centres around the two likeable characters – Shadrack & Gary – whom together brainstorm ideas to improve everyday life from the garage of Gary’s parents house. Their ideas are built off genuine everyday insights that in some strange way make a lot of sense. Where they get unstuck is in their execution. Through the use of humour and being true to the brand, Enviro Loo have developed a campaign that hopes to resonate with the South African public and cast some light on what is inherently an unspoken business.

 

‘Not Kak Ideas’ is a disruptive take on what at times can be a very hard and sensitive category, and serves as a creative platform to break the conventional communication found in the sanitation landscape.

 

Credits:

Agency: Xfacta
Production: Team Best

 

 

Virgin Active radio by M&C Saatchi Abel: D-Floor; Brave Heart; Spider Monkey; Throw a Ball

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Virgin Active knows that it’s hard to get to the gym when it’s chilly outside. So we created a fun series of radio ads to remind listeners that you have to get ready early to have your happiest summer yet. The ads flighted from September 2014.

 

Credits:

Executive Creative Director: Gordon Ray
Copywriter: Kayli Vee Levitan
Art Director: Ntobeko Ximba
Account Director: Faheem Chaudhry & Amanda Crawley
Producer: Sarah Matthes
Studio: We Love Jam
Sound Engineers: Hannes Burger & Arnold Vermaak

 

Vodacom ‘Carol’ by Ireland Davenport

 

 

This ad for Vodacom’s learning centres was made by Ireland Davenport and directed and shot by Markstry, who let us know more, “The little girl Carol is from Queenstown in the Eastern Cape. She attend the Vodacom ICT Centre where she was taught how to edit and shoot. I then documented her making a little movie that she showed her mom in the end. It really was amazing shooting someone who is not an actress. Everything is real in this commercial which breaks away from the norm of adverstising keeping authentic and true. We hope that we inspire more kids like Carol to achieve their dreams.”

 

Credits:

Director: Markstry
DOP: Markstry
Editor: Ryan Jame Nowwood Young
Producer: Cherice Whewell
Executive Producer: Liesl Karpinski
Production House: Spit Fire Films
Grade: Blade
Sound: Kwazi Mojo
Agency: Ireland Davenport
Creative Dircetor: Wihan Meerholz
Copy Writer: Wynand Prinsloo
TV Producer: Sue Tyler

 

DHL ‘Africa As One’ by 7 Different Kinds of Smoke

 

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Jozi based agency 7 Different Kinds of smoke (7DKS) recently launched the DHL “Africa as One” 2015 campaign. DHL Express has set-off to pass a single rugby ball from hand-to-hand through 45 countries over a period of 45 weeks. The DHL rugby ball make its way up the east coast of Africa to Sudan, before returning to southern Africa with a pit stop in the Mauritian islands.

 

The main objective of the campaign is to create maximum reach and noise around the DHL brand, both within Africa and beyond, as the countdown to the official kick-off of the Rugby World Cup 2015 begins. “While DHL is present in more countries than any other company in Africa, rugby is relatively small and largely unknown across most of the continent. With this in mind and in order to maximise the value of DHL’s global sponsorship of the Rugby World Cup 2015 (for the Africa offices), it is important that we grow the knowledge and support base of the game,” explains 7DKS creative partner, James Cloete.

 

To this end, one objective of the campaign is to take rugby training clinics, hosted by Rugby Legends, into as many places as possible. In this way we aim to engage the local population and client base within each territory, and encourage unified support for the African teams who will ultimately compete next year. More importantly though, and from a brand and business perspective, we’re seeking to demonstrate that DHL knows Africa better than any other logistics company and that they are committed to doing business across the continent,” adds Cloete

 

Key and poignant moments of the tour are being documented and shared through AfricaAsOne.com.  

 

More South African advertising.

 

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Oh Wow! – Synonym Study, Sporty Fashion and the World According to Mungo.]]> http://10and5.com/?p=93293 2014-11-21T10:28:51Z 2014-11-21T12:00:35Z

In today’s short, sweet and super colourful Oh Wow! we’re listening to a new Future Sounds of Mzansi mix and The World According to Mungo, flipping through the pages of Nico Krijno’s wonderful photo book and longing after everything in […]

The post Oh Wow! – Synonym Study, Sporty Fashion and the World According to Mungo. appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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In today’s short, sweet and super colourful Oh Wow! we’re listening to a new Future Sounds of Mzansi mix and The World According to Mungo, flipping through the pages of Nico Krijno’s wonderful photo book and longing after everything in Selfi’s SS15 collection.

 

ONE: This week naasMUSIC began a string of summer releases with a brand new artist: mungo., the solo project of Simon Lee.

 

 

The World According to Mungo lands with a meeting of live-instrumentation and an electronic orientation, resulting in an EP featuring familiar guitar sounds accompanied by some hip-hop- and house-inspired beats and electronic textures. Simon plays most of the instruments and produces all of it on his laptop computer, but enlists the assistance of his talented friends for help with brass instruments and vocals. Each track on the EP (which will soon be available for a name your price download) is accompanied by an artwork by Caitie Weare and Amy Lester.

 

Artwork for Track 1: 'Mungo (Intro to...)'

Artwork for Track 1: ‘Mungo (Intro to…)’

Artwork for Track 2: 'Ess/Dee'

Artwork for Track 2: ‘Ess/Dee’

Artwork for Track 3: 'June'13'

Artwork for Track 3: ‘June’13’

Artwork for Track 4: 'Velocipede'

Artwork for Track 4: ‘Velocipede’

 

TWOSynonym Study, a photo book by Nico Krijno.

 

 

THREE – Poster by Daniel Ting Chong for Puma Happy Holiday.

 

Puma Happy-Holiday-Poster by Daniel Ting Chong

 

FOUR – The Selfi SS15 collection.

 

Selfi 1

Selfi 2

Selfi 5

Selfi (7)

Selfi 7

Selfi 4

 

FIVE – The 9th edition of Spoek Mathambo‘s Future Sound of Mzansi mix series, featuring Zaki Ibrahim.

 

 

SIXThe Cool Club shot by Justin Polkey for ELLE Magazine.

 

ELLE - The Cool Kids (1)

ELLE - The Cool Kids (4)

ELLE - The Cool Kids (3)

ELLE - The Cool Kids (2)

ELLE - The Cool Kids (5)

 

 SEVEN – Impromptu doodles and quirky obeservations from Heather Moore’s Instagram account.

 

Heather Moore (3)

 

Heather Moore (9)

 

Heather Moore (6)

 

Heather Moore (5)

 

Heather Moore (8)

 

Heather Moore (4)

 

Heather Moore (10)

 

More Oh Wow!

 

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Rebecca Looringh Van Beeck <![CDATA[An Interview with Kurt Orderson, director of ‘Not in My Neighbourhood’]]> http://10and5.com/?p=93297 2014-11-21T11:16:22Z 2014-11-21T11:16:16Z

Kurt Orderson is a film director and producer whose heart lies in telling honest stories. In his up-coming film, "Not in My Neighbourhood", he pursues the topics of spatial violence, post-Apartheid planning and current-day gentrification, comparing Cape Town and Johannesburg to New York through a series of interviews.

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Kurt Orderson is a film director and producer whose heart lies in telling honest stories. In his up-coming film, “Not in My Neighbourhood”, he pursues the topics of spatial violence, post-Apartheid planning and current-day gentrification, comparing Cape Town and Johannesburg to New York through a series of interviews. “I make films to heal the people,” he says, with an aim to always tell both sides to a story. He’s relaxed, easy to talk to and very passionate about uncovering common threads between people who live miles apart. Having just got back from Los Angeles, we spoke with him over Skype to find out about his background growing up in Mitchell’s Plain, his interests, new film and life living between South Africa and the US.

 

Where are you now?

 

I’m back home. I just got back a day ago.

 

You must be feeling quite tired then.

 

Yeah, but it’s all good. We’ve got to keep it moving.

 

Why did you choose to tell this story?

 

It’s a very personal film, but everything we do is personal, right? I’ve been at the centre, where people have been victimised for centuries. An ongoing process of spatial violence has affected my family and ancestry. My parents both lived in Woodstock/Salt River and were victims of the Group Areas Act in the 1960s. The film really came about after conversations with my father. He would reminisce about his days living in Woodstock as a kid. They were eventually moved to Bonteville, though. He would tell me stories about going to the Salt River swimming pool and jumping over the wall. Those were the kinds of stories I heard from my father. I remember one day we were driving along Salt River Main Road and he was telling me how the space had changed. Most of those spots were factories, textile or screen-printing, and that was his stomping ground many years ago. He told me that he was quite surprised about what is happening now and that triggered the idea for the film.

 

 

Where do your interests lie and how does this film relate to other work you’ve done?

 

I’ve made a number of films that touch on similar subjects. Whether they are about farm workers, people who live on the streets, or land reform, the issue of land and land ownership has been very close to my work for many years now. I made a film about farm workers in Citrusdal, and a film about the legacy of land reform and the empty promise of the 1930s Land Act post-1994.

 

How did the concept develop?

 

What inspired the film was the issue of how to reconcile and confront the question of spatial violence. It’s been happening for centuries, whether we’re talking about the arrival of the Dutch in 1652 or what we know now as architectural Apartheid or gentrification. I’ve wanted to make a film about architectural Apartheid for many years. Having grown up in Mitchell’s Plain understanding that there is a legacy behind how people ended up there, I’d been dwelling on this issue. The story came to me one day in New York when I was in Harlem and saw a graffiti piece that said “get out of our neighbourhood, gentrifiers”. That’s when I realised it’s a global phenomenon. I wanted to tell the story about how people ended up in spatial situations of that nature, looking into the legacy of spatial planning. It’s been with me for a while and it just happens that the term ‘gentrification’ has become very topical. So I thought “boom” the time is now right to make the film.

 

   

 

How did the film making process progress?

 

Obviously I had a set of ideas and plans. As human beings moving within the natural flow of life, everything happens in the mystic. You might have a set of your own utopian ideas but then you meet certain kindred spirits who add to your vision. That’s what happens and that’s what normally happens in my film making process. As a film maker I call for response, not a physical calling but rather a telepathic wave, and then the receivers come to me. I like to think of my films not just as art for art’s sake.

 

Tell me about the title “Not in My Neighbourhood”.

 

It stems from the term “not in my backyard”. It’s a term that describes middle-class communities who show their support for urban interventions, but as long as it doesn’t encroach on their space and their property values. But at the same time, in the diversity of a city like Cape Town, how do you consider who should be in that space but not this space? These large-scale inequalities can be tracked back to colonialism and slavery, and they are not being confronted. We are putting a cloak over the idea of what reconciliation really means. We talk about social cohesion and a rainbow nation but those are all utopian ideas, fantasies. We must confront the idea of inequality and the legacy of institutional racism.

 

With the name ‘Not in My Neighbourhood’ the intention is to set it right from the other side of the encroachment. It’s about the idea of re-colonising spaces from the perspective of previously disadvantaged people.

 

Many of my ideas pop into my head, freestyle, you know, without being able to pinpoint exactly when and where they came from.

 

We’re super interested to know your reasons behind choosing New York as a comparison to Cape Town and Johannesburg, especially since many other cities throughout Africa, and the world, have similar urban conditions. What inspired you to feature these three cities?

 

For me, New York is the catalyst for the ‘global city’. It’s the epicentre of contemporary culture and arts. It’s where everyone wants to end up. For many, from developing countries, the ambition is to get to New York and make it big. And then Cape Town and Johannesburg, being emerging world class cities eager to achieve in the global marketplace, admire New York’s identity. Whether you’re hanging out in Maboneng, Johannesburg, or Braamfontein, or here in Cape Town in Long Street or Sea Point, you can see how people play out certain things that are inspired by New York or the States. Whether it is a food truck or outside market, all these things came out of the States, and New York is the central space where it has been happening for a while. There is a connection; Cape Town and New York were both colonised by the Dutch. The Dutch came to New York in 1626 and 25 years later they end up in Cape Town. Immediately there is a link. Both were victims of spatial violence that came out of the Dutch colonial project and I wanted to tell the story of what happened to them afterwards. After colonialism you have the legacy of slavery both in North America and in South Africa. There’s the Civil Rights Movement in America then Apartheid in South Africa. Black people in North America are spatialised into ghettos or townships and the same thing happens in South Africa. There are so many similarities between the two cities that I’ve witnessed and experienced.

 

 

Had you been to New York before setting out to make this film?

 

I moved to the States in 2006. I wanted to travel. I wanted to see what was happening on the other side of the hemisphere. I was working at the SABC at the time, producing and directing current affairs and news and educational programs. That was my gig for a while and I realised I needed to get out of it. After three years of working there I was like, “yo, peace out”. I applied for a job to teach visual arts in New Jersey. From there I then moved to Baltimore. New Jersey was cool but my highlight was really working in Baltimore. This is where I had many revelations and found out the real story of America, not the fictional story. It is there that I was confronted with American realities. I was working in the heart of the ghetto. Baltimore, being one of the most violent cities in America, and I was working in the crux. I was working with youth at risk, with parents in prison and/or on drugs. What was interesting for me was that there I was, a boy from the Cape Flats, coming to Baltimore which was also a ghetto or township. And I was experiencing a similar legacy, people who had gone through many forms of oppression. We had the same story. It was similar to home.

 

I used to travel to New York on bus over weekends. And I’ve been travelling to New York for almost 10 years now, and have familiarised myself with the space. I guest lecture at the University of Pennsylvania, working in their anthropology Department in what’s known as visual anthropology. So I go to the States once or twice a year.

 

You’ve spoken about many of the similarities, but what were the differences between Cape Town or Johannesburg and New York?

 

In terms of infrastructure and aesthetics, the typography, we’re talking about two worlds. We’re talking about a supposed first world city versus an aspiring and developing nation. New York has a fascinating history and it’s a globalised setup. If you want to meet people from all over the world, you go to New York. People have gone through various processes of change, whereas in South Africa we’re only really tasting the idea.

 

Although, at the same time, there is fictional hype around the States. You might assume that there are no poor people in New York but people are struggling to get by. Especially after the recent recession and property meltdown that happened just over 5 years ago, people are struggling and have 2 or 3 jobs just to get by. I tell them that I live in a developing nation where I can work one job and I’ll be fine. America is a first world country living with third world realities.

 

I’ve met some really amazing people in New York, who have become really good friends of mine, people who support my work. Whenever one of my films is made we know that New York is one of those places that will facilitate three or four screenings. But I want my films to be more accessible in Cape Town and South Africa. I want more people to support what I do here, in my own country. Most of my films are produced independently but to be honest I’ve had more success outside of South Africa.

 

Why do you make films?

 

A lot of my past work has focussed around the African diaspora, people who were taken to the US by force through slavery, and what it means to be of African diaspora decent, questioning how these people connect to Africa. A lot of my work has uncovered common stories. The idea of taking this hidden knowledge and questioning how to rewrite curriculums about Africa, has underpinned much of my work. At school, Americans learn about stereotypical Africa, as the “dark continent” where everyone has AIDS. Working with school kids in Brooklyn or Harlem or Baltimore, I’ve really had an opportunity to explain that there are people just like you; they may sound different to you or have a different accent but they have the same struggles and similar issues. How do we share our stories, so that collective healing can take place?

 

I make films to heal the people. There’s a saying that with no justice there can’t be peace. It’s about bringing justice to the people and restoring their dignity that has been broken, like my mom and dad who have had brokenness in their lives for a very long time. What I can do is make these films to help them heal, to show the animosity but also say that we can conquer it. I believe in a positive outlook in life.

 

And how does your film ‘Not in My Neighbourhood’ achieve that?

 

It’s about being a voice for the voiceless. It’s about telling the story of the truth of what has happened. It addresses how history has been compromised. Let’s be honest. And ‘Not in My Neighbourhood’ is an honest portrait, telling the chronological history of spatial violence within the context of architectural apartheid and gentrification.

 

 

Post-Apartheid (and post-colonial) planning is a challenge. How do you feel about gentrification?

 

To be blunt, it’s a human rights violation.

 

Did you feel like that before making the film as well?

When I was growing up, to come to town was a 30 minute trip. It was a special outing. “We’re going to town!” we’d say. But it was almost like we weren’t a part of Cape Town. It’s interesting to analyse our daily dialogue where we still say that we are going to “Cape Town” but we’re actually in Cape Town already. It distinguishes “the other” and people feel that. And it’s continuing with gentrification, the process of reaffirming privilege.

 

I have my reasons for living in the CBD now. For me it is about reclaiming space. Even if you’re from “there” you can come live “here”. The ghettos were constructed. It wasn’t my choice that I grew up in Mitchell’s Plain, my parents were put there by force. They lost their property, similar to Sophiatown in Johannesburg, and I’ve always tried to emphasise the idea of reclaiming space.

 

Spatial violence is continuing but how can it change and how does your film promote change?

 

It’s important to speak to the gentrifiers as well. Money is power in the capitalist world and what I’m trying to do is speak to both sides. To say that if you are looking to change a space, approach it in a more transparent way and involve the people. And on a real level not on a disconnected level like promises of job creation because that level never works, it never happens. The City of Cape Town calls the notion of “making everything better” urban “renewal”, also terming it “revitalisation” which in itself is problematic.

 

 

How did you choose who you interviewed?

 

Most were planned and structured. Kent, a friend from highschool, is someone I’ve known for a long time. He’s living in Woodstock but also came from the ghettos. And Mpho, I met her after going to one of her lectures at UCT and was very interested in what she was saying. It aligned with what I had been researching around architectural Apartheid. I was interested in how the roads were built, the depth and width of the roads, the materials used, how the entrances and exits were structured. So Mpho was the best person to tell that story and she’s mad sharp as well. The camera loves her.

 

And in New York?

 

Many of these interviews were organised through a colleague of mine who has been living in New York for many years now. She helped me with sourcing the people in New York. But there are also people in the film who I met on the streets. I was working in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and I was quite interested because that’s been the epicentre of hipsters so I went there with my camera and met people who had been victims of gentrification.

 

And what was the most unexpected or interesting story you came across? Or perhaps a character you met that you didn’t intend to meet?

 

Oh, yes! The one brother, Vanache ‘The Stampede’, he’s a musician and visual artist whose family comes from Nigeria although he was born in the States. I asked him about what genre of music he makes and he says he does action and romantic comedy. That was quite refreshing. And then him telling the story of Williamsburg as well, what he’s witnessed through his own eyes as an artist, seeing the space evolve and how he doesn’t feel a part of it anymore. It used to be a more inclusive space where locals would interact with artists but now you don’t see the locals. They say that it was the artist who first justified gentrification. It’s the same in Woodstock, where the artists come in and the next moment property developers think it’s now a cool place to change.

 

What’s your plan for the film? Are you finished filming?

 

We have a rough cut but are still raising money to complete it. This is not just going to be a once-off documentary; there is a whole transmedia concept. A photographic exhibition (shot by four photographers from each city) that will travel around the world is planned. The film will also go on a road-trip with an educational component. There’s going to be an interactive chatroom and website as well.

 

If funding permits I’d like to expand the film outside of South Africa and New York. If I get funding, the idea is to look at places like Germany, for example, looking at spatial segregation and urbanisation after WW2. I want to possibly look at spaces like Lagos, Nigeria and other African cities, India potentially as well. I also have to go back to Johannesburg to look at what happened just before the world cup started. I want to spend time with some informal traders who were moved out of the city in 2010. I’m supposed to go on another trip to New York to do more research as well.

 

The dream is to develop this beyond a once-off film into a television series, producing 4 to 5 films within the same theme. I’m working with the African Centre for Cities (affiliated with UCT) and also South African History Online. Hopefully, the idea is to leverage on what they bring on board through their connections, to see how we can tap into different sources to get my film out there. I’m open to collaboration. It’s a story of people, not a story about me.

 

When can we expect to see it?

 

I’m looking at March next year, if everything goes to plan. Touch wood.

 

Watch other films made by Kent on his Azania Rizing Productions YouTube channel and Tumblr.

 

 

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Featured: Photographs by Lakin Ogunbanwo | Where Classical Portraiture and Fashion Converge]]> http://10and5.com/?p=93350 2014-11-21T09:20:17Z 2014-11-21T10:00:39Z

  Classical portraiture and high fashion co-exist with ease in the gloriously off kilter work of Lagos-born photographer, Lakin Ogunbanwo. His curious gaze presents glamour in the same breath as intimacy; finding it’s focus on, say, a pair of bright […]

The post Featured: Photographs by Lakin Ogunbanwo | Where Classical Portraiture and Fashion Converge appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Lakin Ogunbanwo (1)

 

Classical portraiture and high fashion co-exist with ease in the gloriously off kilter work of Lagos-born photographer, Lakin Ogunbanwo. His curious gaze presents glamour in the same breath as intimacy; finding it’s focus on, say, a pair of bright pink lips which hold just as much weight as do the unusual scars on the cheeks beside them. Since his first solo exhibition, The Mask, Lakin has been interested in ambiguity and exploring the notion of disguise. In many of his portraits, the subject’s face is turned away or concealed – either by a physical object, or within a shadow. “I’ve always been interested in form, shapes, silhouettes and body language. And while the face can say a lot, I think the body can convey just as much,” he explains.

 

Lakin grew up in what he describes as a “very regular environment”; a place where education was important, respect was utmost and peacefully co-habiting with everyone was key. While attending law school at Babcock University in Nigeria in 2008, he began his transition into the world of art and photography. “I had always been interested in photography,” says Lakin, “but when studying law it became apparent – more to my friends than me, to begin with – that ‘something’ was there. I explored it by photographing a lot of my friends, and by the time I was done with my degree (at Buckingham University in England) in 2012, I couldn’t imagine doing anything else.”

 

Being completely self-taught in the discipline allowed Lakin to find his voice quickly, as he wasn’t exposed to many outside influences. “I was pretty much set on a certain kind of subject matter, and I had a clear vision of how I wanted to represent it. The challenge to this,” he counters,” is that it does limit versatility because it’s easy to become very set in your ways.” Though he spends a considerable amount of time preparing or conceptualising for a shoot, his approach still makes way for spontaneity. He enjoys working in a way that is more of an immediate response to what he sees or feels in the moment, and this has resulted in most of his own favourite images.

 

From 7 October – 21 November, a selection of Lakin’s new work was exhibited at Whatiftheworld gallery in Cape Town. The collection of photographs celebrate the sculptural nature of the body, as the texture of skin, hair or clothing are used as agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form. An extract from the exhibition text reads: “For Lakin, fashion is a game of desire based on creative identity. He embraces fashion photography’s traits of concealing and revealing the human form to accentuate style…and seems to recognise that even in a portrait, the face emerges as a space of constructing and concealing and revealing – of playing a role of desire. Working in the overcrowded and dynamic city of Lagos, Lakin’s work belies the youthfulness of a new era marked by façade, play acting, imitation and innovation.”

 

Currently Lakin is working towards a new solo exhibition next year, which will be a continued exploration of the different visual style practices that he has incorporated into his work in the past. Perhaps moreso than anything, he’s on a quest to simply “share the things I see the way I see them” – ample assurance that there is much more of his fascinating and beautiful imagery to come.

 

To see more of Lakin’s work visit www.lakinogunbanwo.com, and stay up to date with him on tumblr and Instagram.

 

Lakin Ogunbanwo (3)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (2)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (4)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (5)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (9)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (7)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (8)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (6)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (11)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (19)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (10)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (12)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (13)

Lakin Ogunbanwo (14)

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[WISHLIST: A Colour-Coded Collection of Things to Beautify Your Home]]> http://10and5.com/?p=93115 2014-11-21T08:49:19Z 2014-11-21T08:49:19Z

A collection of beautiful, local art and design items that would make a welcome addition to any home - organised according to colour.

The post WISHLIST: A Colour-Coded Collection of Things to Beautify Your Home appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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It’s WISHLIST time! Alongside our annual series of guest curated gift guides this year, we’ve launched a directory of local products and stores and for the next few weeks we’ll also be publishing some themed lists of our own. First up: a collection of things to beautify your home (nothing wrong with a gift “from me, to me”) or someone else’s if you’re feeling generous, organised according to colour.

 

The Halo, a limited edition Phrenology Vase by Chandler House:

 

1 Limited Edition Phrenology Vase (The Halo Vase) by Chandler House

 

Satellite Pendant light by Studio Number 19:

 

2 The Satellite pendant light by Studio Number 19

 

Long Leg Mirror by Jasper Eales:

 

3 Long leg mirror by Jasper Eales

 

Fiela Lamp by The Artisan:

 

4 Fiela Lamp by The Artisan

 

Marlena Candle Holders by Joe Paine:

 

5 Marlena Candle Holders by Joe Paine

 

 Robot by Ceramic Factory:

 

2 Ceramic Factory

 

 Cast bronze bowl by Bronze Age:

 

6 Cast bronze bowl by Bronze Age

 

Aztec rug by Airloom:

 

9 Airloom rug

 

SG chair by Anatomy Design in collaboration with Nicky Levenberg:

 

7 SG chair by Anatomy Design in collaboration with Nicky Levenberg

 

 MLM Portrait, an artisnal tile by Ruan Hoffman for Clé:

 

 

10 MLM Portrait, an artisnal tile by Ruan Hoffman for Clé

 

Ctrl,Alt,Del side table by Nawaaz Saldulker:

 

11 The Ctrl Alt Del table by Nawaaz Saldulker

 

Source Wire Chair by Haldane Martin:

 

12 Source Wire Chair by Haldane Martin

 

Bedside cabinets by Conrad Botes:

 

12 Bedside cabinets by Conrad Botes

 

Hinge Server by Dokter and Misses:

 

13 Hinge Server by Dokter and Misses

 

Green Herringbone cusion cover by Touchee Feelee:

 

14 Green Herringbone scatter cusion by Touchee Feelee

 

Soft buckets by Skinny la Minx:

 

15 Soft buckets by Skinny la Minx

 

 Wallpaper by Atang Tshikare for Robin Sprong:

 

16 Atang Tshikare for Robin Sprong Wallpaper

 

Wooden stool by Goet:

 

17 Stool by GOET

 

Yes, Kenya by Heidi Fourie:

 

Heidi-Fourie_Yes-Kenya

 

The Dot Mirror by Liam Mooney:

 

20 The Dot Mirror by Liam Mooney

 

Kreep planter by Joe Paine:

 

18 Planter by Joe Paine

 

Wire bowl by Indigi Designs:

 

 

19 Wire bowl by Indigi Designs

 

Desert RoseLocker by Egg Designs:

 

21 Desert RoseLocker by Egg Designs

 

Bucket Barstool by Pedersen and Lennard:

 

22 Bucket Barstool by Pedersen and Lennard

 

Pyramid Wall Hooks by Studio Number 19:

 

22 Pyramid Wall Hooks by Studio Number 19

 

Ash and leather table by Wiid Design:

 

23 Ash and leather table by Wiid Design

 

The Fig light by Makers of Stuff:

 

24 The Fig light by Makers of Stuff

 

Julie Juu tray by Shine Shine:

 

julie-juu-tray-front_630W

 

Recycle bin by Pedersen and Lennard:

 

24 Recycle bin by Pedersen and Lennard

 

Day chairs by Bofred:

 

25 Day chairs by Bofred

 

Pink Sundown cushion cover by Mingo Lamberti:

 

27 Pink Sundown cushion cover by Mingo Lamberti

 

 Delicious Pink low chest by De Styl x Renee Rossouw:

 

28 Delicious Pink low chest by Renee Rossouw x De Styl

 

Hanging planter by Boskke:

 

29 Hanging planter by Boskke

 

Getting Happy, a silk tapestry by Billie Zangewa:

 

billie-zangewa-getting-happy-silk-tapestry-102x112cm-2004

 

CLOUD light by Makers of Stuff:

 

30 Makers of Stuff CLOUD Light

 

Red chevron rug by Airloom:

 

31 Airloom red chevron rug

 

Stool by Indigi Designs:

 

32 Indigi Designs Stool

 

The Paradise is Here collection by Skinny la Minx:

 

33 Skinny LaMinx Paradise Is Here collection

 

LittleMan light by David Krynauw:

 

34 LittleMan light by David Krynauw

 

Radio box by Mr Somebody and Mr Nobody:

 

35 Mr Somebody and Mr Nobody Radio Box

 

Scatter cushion by Modern Stranger:

 

36 Modern Stranger scatter cusion

 

Modern Stranger chair by Bofred:

 

37 Modern Stranger chair by Bofred

 

Lighting fixture by Heath Nash:

 

38 Light by Heath Nash

 

Landscape Test 3 by Alexia Vogel:

 

Landscape Test 3 by Alexia Vogel

 

Fold up table by Jasper Eales:

 

39 Fold Up Table by Jasper Eales

 

Laundry basekt by Design Afrika:

 

40 Design Afrika laundry basket

 

Alter Ego, a lazer etched mirror by Givan Lötz:

 

41 Alter Ego by Givan Lotz

 

Hexagonal Brass and Matt Black Mobile by David Ross:

 

41 Hexagonal Brass and Matt Black Mobile by David Ross

 

Dry Leaf and Bottlebrush cushion covers by Touchee Feelee:

 

42 Dry Leaf and Bottlebrush cusion covers by Touchee Feelee

 

Droplet chandelier by Willowlamp:

 

43 Willowlamp Droplet Chandelier

 

Quaker Bench by Gregor Jenkin:

 

45 Quaker Bench by Gregor Jenkin

 

Macrame planter by KNØT:

 

46 KNOT macrame planter

 

Haywire Black Ash light by David Krynauw:

 

47 Haywire Black Ash light by David Krynauw

 

Salt and pepper dishes by Klomp Ceramics:

 

44 Salt and pepper dishes by Klomp Ceramics

 

Abstraction by Swain Hoogervorst:

 

Swain-Hoogervorst-Abstraction

 

Tri light by Dark Horse:

 

45 Dark Horse Tri light

 

For more guides to local gifting, see our first two guest curated WISHLISTS by graphic designer Daniel Ting Chong and stylist Siki Msuseni.

 

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Simphiwe Xulu <![CDATA[Featured: Thommo Hart Photographs the work of Siya Nzama]]> http://10and5.com/?p=92788 2014-11-20T08:09:00Z 2014-11-20T12:00:27Z

  As the son of the late celebrated South African artist and ceramist Juliet Armstrong, Thommo Hart was naturally thrust into a life of visual storytelling from a very young age. Citing his mothers huge passion for art and creativity […]

The post Featured: Thommo Hart Photographs the work of Siya Nzama appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Tom Hart - Tatoos4

Praying Hands Tattoo | Design by Siya Nzama | Photographed by Thommo Hart

 

As the son of the late celebrated South African artist and ceramist Juliet Armstrong, Thommo Hart was naturally thrust into a life of visual storytelling from a very young age. Citing his mothers huge passion for art and creativity as one of the main influences behind his creative career, Thommo’s love for documenting and filming the uncomfortable realities of the new South Africa saw his passion manifest in this photographic project he calls B Boys | Fly Girls and Graffiti Story. Part of the culmination of a 10 year relationship with the community of Copesville Township, this photographic series tells the story of Siya Nzama, an artist living in the disadvantaged area of Copesville, making a small difference in his community through his art. We spoke with documentary filmmaker and photographer Thommo about the project.

 

Who is Thommo Hart and how did you get into photography?

I am a humanitarian, artist, storyteller and adventurer. I live life as one grand adventure that consists of a series of smaller adventurers that make up the circle of life. I come from South Africa’s “Sleepy-hollow”, Pietermaritzburg, where I spent my childhood in the classrooms of St Charles College and exploring the old colonial streets. I have a social science degree in Fine Art, Media and Marketing, an Honours degree in Media Studies and a Master’s degree in Development Communication. At present, I am living in Dar es Salaam where I work for a Swiss based NGO that cares for children in stress and provides educational programmes for children in Tanzania and Malawi to excel at school. I have been working in the humanitarian industry in East Africa for two years now as a communication specialist. Thus my job has allowed me to keep my camera by my side wherever I go which has given me the space to be an artist and storyteller as well.

 

What do you look for in the perfect picture?

A story. For me the perfect picture is one that speaks visually on a moment in reality through the mediums of light, space and time as well as the characters with this moment. Light is the soul of a photograph. It is what gives a photograph emotion or feeling. Thus for the perfect picture there needs to be light that can be manipulated to give emotion to a scene that is being played out in reality in front of my lens. I love playing with harsh contrast in light, especially in rustic, urban and rigid settings such as city alleyways, construction sites, rundown buildings and industrial factories. These make interesting spaces in which to document at certain times of the day. Characters are also important to me in a way that their representations within a captured moment visually can create a scene and story and thus a perfect picture in my opinion. However, the power play of representations in a visual image such as a photograph can be tricky and one has to be careful not to represent a character that is insensitive or that portrays stereotypes. Bring these three elements into a photograph, portray them in a way that tells a story and make the viewer sense a feeling of emotion with the visual, this is what I look for in the perfect picture

 

Tom Hart - Tatoos3

Tattooist & Graffiti Artist Siya Nzama Photographed by Thommo Hart

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats32

 

Why has it taken you so long to share B Boys | Fly Girls and Graffiti Story with the creative community?

It’s been a slow journey in rediscovering myself as an artist. Since studying ceramics and sculpture under my mother during university ten years ago, I moved away from art and became interested in advertising, marketing and production which eventually led to my career focus in development, health communication and humanitarianism. Soon after my graduating from masters I ended up travelling and working in East Africa, which subsequently led to me taking a lot of pictures and rediscovering my passion for photography. While back home in Pietermaritzburg last year, the opportunity rose from a friend of my called Siya to document the work he has been doing in Copesville township on the outskirts of the city. I spent 3 months working with him but had to leave at short notice because I accepted a communications manager position in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Thus, in dedication to him and the work we have done, I decided to put up my work for display to the public this year.

 

The choice of using black and white in such a colourful setting is always of interest. What influenced your decision to present the work in this manner?

I find colour photographs too distracting. The bright colours deter the deeper story within the captured moment. Black and white photos I find more emotional through the play of light, space and composition. Coloured photographs are for advertising and travel compositions in my opinion and do not interest me in terms of a medium for my art work. Although, as a photographer I still capture colour photographs, but only for commercial and travelling work. My choice of black and white also comes from my teenage years in the late 90s working with an old manual pentax camera and 50mm and then playing with the negatives in a dark room and coming out with either grainy, hard contrasts or smooth prints.

 

In a time when there is so much focus on the beautification of the South African aesthetic, your work on B Boys | Fly Girls attempts to search for graphic imagery and representation. Why this choice now?

I believe there is far too much beautification of South Africa or what media theorists call hyper reality. South Africa has become a magazine cover and South Africans and representations of South Africa have lost touch with reality. Thus I think it’s time we as South Africans become grounded again and celebrate who we are in reality no matter our situation, demographics, class, race or background.

 

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats11

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats10

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats15

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats25

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats21

 

What interested you about the subjects in Graffiti Story?

My friendship with Siya and my work with youths in Copesville Township is what got me interested in the graffiti art being designed on the walls of tin shack homes. I worked with youths within the Copesville community on a number of production and art projects during my studies at UKZN Pietermaritzburg. During this time I formed friendships with two youth leaders within the group, Clement Ntuli and Siya. Clement was a convicted criminal and jailbird once upon a time, but now is a HIV/Aids activist, academic, performer and motivational speaker. Siya does not have as a dramatic story as Clement’s, but is none the less a leader in the community and an aspiring artist. Due to unemployment and the lack of funds to enroll at university to study media and art, Siya started something unique last year that caught my idea. He has been spraying graffiti art and painting murals on the mud and tin wall shacks of homes within the Copesville community. The exciting thing is that he sees these graffiti designs and murals as art and so do the members of the community. Thus he is getting a lot of requests to paint or spray the walls of homes within Copesville. One could suggest that his mural paintings and grafitti art are making the township of Copesville one big artwork, tin shack by tin shack. Now this concept is what gets me really excited because it re-appropriates the raw reality of a township in South Africa and reconstructs it into an artwork that tells the story of the people as they are in everyday life. It’s a celebration of his community.

 

When it comes to street and documentary photography, there is a thin line between offensive work and groundbreaking work. How did you draw the line as a storyteller on this series?

I draw the line between offensive work and groundbreaking work by working with the community and people that I document over the years and always providing a platform from my work that benefits the people, communities and spaces I capture. I also tend to stay away from stereotypes and to tell the story I am capturing as if my lens was the eyes of the person I was within the photograph. Thus in this series, I had worked in the community of Copesville for the last 10 years which allowed me to become a member myself and understand the complex relations and structures of the community. Furthermore, I had become friends with youth that I had worked with thus becoming apart of the group and creating a gaze through my lens that was more personal, understanding and reflective of the situation or scene at hand.

 

B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti15

B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti17

B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti12

B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti6

 

What are some of the clichés you try to steer away from in your work?

I am not a fan of the South African clichés that portray South African society as this 1st World utopian nation light years ahead of Africa which our government and corporate businesses love to represent to the rest of the world. It gives a false sense of reality or a hyper reality in which most ordinary South Africans can’t live, thus creating an identity crisis and conflict within our society. The other clichés I tend to stay away from are the poverty and violence stricken stereotypes that riddle the visual displays of our local media and international media. As a result, I try and portray the visual representations of reality as if through the eyes of the people within that space and time that I am capturing.

 

When you are shooting, how much of it is instinct verses planned?

A lot of my work revolves around working with the people and the spaces that I capture for extended periods of time, thus a lot of my work tends to be planned like the graffiti and tattoo stories. However, I do carry my camera around with me a lot within the communities and places I work and it usually becomes an everyday item to the people around me because of this. This has allowed me to shoot instinctively at times whenever a moment arises that I think needs to be told.

 

What have been some of your best achievements to date?

On a visual basis, my short multi media film with the Khwe Bushmen community outside Kimberley and its cinematography award was a great achievement in terms of my visual documentation work.

 

Outside of photography, you’re also a modern day creative who is involved in projects outside the normal sphere of art? What do you feel is the role of the modern artist?

The modern artist’s role in society is to create work that tells a story to the public that makes them questions their existence, their role in society, the role of others in society and issues of humanity that are still being debated in the public sphere.

 

Where can we follow your work?

People can follow my work on my new Facebook page. I’m also currently developing a website for my work.

 

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats29

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats30

B Boys, Fly Girls-Homemade Tats28

B Boys, Fly Girls - Tattoos1

Tom Hart - Tatoos1

Tom Hart - Tatoos

Tom Hart - Tatoos2

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B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti3

B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti2

B Boys, Fly Girls - Graffeti5

 

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Layla Leiman <![CDATA[Featured: Dineo Bopape And Indulging The Poetic Elasticity And Materiality Of Things]]> http://10and5.com/?p=92460 2014-11-20T07:47:28Z 2014-11-20T11:00:26Z

Dineo Bopape talks to us about her interest in the ambiguous gaps between things - objects, space, event, memory, time... And how to de/re/construct a story to tell it anew.

The post Featured: Dineo Bopape And Indulging The Poetic Elasticity And Materiality Of Things appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Sketch For Possible Landscape Painting – 2013. Mixed media installation

 

Dineo Bopape is a Johannesburg-based artist whose work focuses on the ambiguous gaps between things – a fragmented post-modern experience, what she calls our “collective global schizophrenic now”. Dineo works in various mediums from video, to installation, to sculpture and performative situations. Her work engages the poetics of the performative (cultural) object, ideas of language, ideology, contemporary audio-visual culture, performativity and perception, and indulges the poetic elasticity and materiality of things (objects, space, event, memory, time…).

 

Dineo is interested in notions of ephemerality, disrupted narratives, performed stories and fragments of language, dismantled sites of memory, and temporal expectation. These ideas are reflected in her work in the negative spaces – the spatial relations between objects or between images and sounds within a video’s frames. She goes on to explain:

 

One of my primary concerns is how to tell a story, how to de/re/construct a story…how to tell an old story anew. How to forget, and how to remember. […] I am interested in video time and in some sort of a decay in linearity; in mediation and artifice; in things acting as things/things acting as props around which multiple stories dance/and are entangled.

 

 

Your installations are like fragments from another world. Can you tell us a little about your interest in metaphysics and if/how this influences your art.

 

There is a title of a book by one of my favourite ‘meta-physicians’- Archile Varzi, called “Insurmountable Simplicities”- what an aptly titled book…the contents too… but/ in other words I have some interests in the simple/big questions… death, life, space, nothing…time…, thingness-materiality etc. It somehow has to do with the performative within my installations… how things perform in space and in time, and what are those things – and can those things keep changing/change form/change meaning/ change location or not…how do meanings exist parallel to each other – or seemingly divergent ideas/stories etc. co-exist… How do things connect, meet – how does the story endure or not or morph…

 

things are closer than they appear – 2014. Mixed media. Dimensions variable

6 5 4

 

For your show at Stevenson last year you stated that you were continuing to work on “ideas of memory, time, space, narration, trauma, displacement, nonsense, etc.” Has this list changed since then?

 

I guess I continue to work on those things…. Although at the moment I am trying to be empty so as to hear…

 

Can you expand on some of these (and new) ideas a little in relation to your work…

 

This is kind of addressed in the first question… The metaphysical questions are perhaps ways in which to try to understand/come to grips with the world…the real world, the imagined world, the many worlds…. forgetting and remembering… so much of yesterday is saturated in today – how it continues without any clear ending sometimes… And the question is what to do with it? What to do with all the data? All the memory? Or non memory? And also things that have no language to describe them properly- things that are not really ‘things’…. And time and space are not linear ‘things’… somehow madness/mental states have always been an interest for me… logic…metaphor… But also citizenship or foreignness are some ideas I am thinking of…. And rules…

 

Stills from: is i am sky – 2013. Digital video, colour, sound. Duration 17min 48sec

Is-I-am-sky-4is-i-am-sky1Is-I-am-sky-2Is-I-am-sky-1

 

How does a new work come into being? Do you start with a clear idea of the intended outcome, or is it more of a haphazard and organic process of discovery and creation?

 

It is usually haphazard…. A process of researching unrelated things…. Which sometimes come to my attention by accident… sometimes new work is a continuation of unfinished ideas from the trajectories of older works…. Research also takes different forms; reading, thinking/playing/testing…. Reading fiction also helps generate some ideas somehow…looking, boredom, window shopping (helps me think of others), travelling, playing…

 

 

Words, phrases, visual cues and found objects are appropriated in your work. Where do you source these from and what guides you in this process?

 

The objects could come from anywhere…shops – some are more common than others – bust most are common… the materials are almost easily available anywhere/everywhere – which also kind of speaks of our globalised world… a lot of things are made in China, and much of it looks the same around the world – well….in most/some cases.

 

but that is not the important part of the story – 2013. Mixed media. Dimensions variable [and stills from burning video]

DSC_7308---Lyon-FranceDSC_7299---Lyon-FranceDSC_7285---Lyon-FranceDSC_7278---Lyon-France

but-that-is-not-the-important-part-of-the-story1 but-that-is-not-the-important-part-of-the-story3 but-that-is-not-the-important-part-of-the-story4

 

Your installations convey the sense of meticulous construction and simultaneous random chance. Is this paradoxical ambiguity intentional? How does it relate to the themes and ideas in your work?

 

Hmmm…paradoxical ambiguity… (un/intentional) paradoxical ambiguity…. That is interesting… Ambiguity and paradoxes and chance meeting intentionality are also ideas that interest me… like playing with riddles, turning logic upside down…

 

 

What appeals to you about working across different mediums?

 

Every medium needs something else – a way of being/thinking/making that is different from the other… digital video editing is so virtual, the physicality of sculpture is more physical and meditative… but different from the physicality of drawing…which is more immediate.

 

 

How has living, studying and working abroad influenced your art making?

 

Not sure exactly…. But perhaps it has opened the way I make work, I definitely find it stimulating working away from home… although I am ‘nearsighted’ with my eyes – I do seem to see better or clearer from further away, questions beget more and more questions when I am ‘away’.

 

green-treeeee-flowr

green treeeee flowr – 2010. Digital print. 55 x 41.25cm

yoh,-what's-this-now-and

yoh, what’s this now and – 2010. Digital print. 76.81 x 57.61cm

blue

blue – 2010. Digital print. 20 x 18.31cm

 

When you’re not making art, what are some of the things you spend your time doing?

 

I like to swim, I read, and watch films, I like to look at fresh fruits and vegetables, I like to eat and cook sometimes…. I am hoping to learn something new/something I don’t know yet…

 

 

When’s your next local exhibition and can you share any insights about it with us?

 

Not yet sure…. Been busy with this video – at the moment titled “because history has no vacuums” or something like that… it has been bothering me for a long time – and it remains unfinished, so I’d like to finish it and screen it… I have shown it to a few people – but I would like to show it to others…. and more – but it has not resolved itself yet….

 

See more of Dineo’s work on her blog: seshee.blogspot.com

 

Stills from: the problem of beauty – 2009. Digital video, colour, sound. Duration 7min 19sec

the-problem-of-beauthe-problem-of-beautythe-problem-of-beauty3the-problem-of-beauty4

 

Stills from: grass green/ sky blue – 2008. SD digital video. Duration 6 min 52 sec, sound

grass green/ sky blue - 2008. SD digital video Duration 6 min 52 sec, soundvlcsnap-2014-11-18-15h58m52s31 vlcsnap-2014-11-18-15h58m19s210

 

 

Stills from: they act as lovers: microwave cosmic background: so massivethat its decay opened the ultimate hole from which the universe emerged:…effect no.55, 2 ends of a bent mirror – 2011. Three-channel video projection. HD video. Duration 12 min 14 sec, synchronised, sound, colour

They-act-as-lovers-1they-act-as-lovers-2They-act-as-lovers-3

 

All images ©Dineo Bopape. Courtesy STEVENSON Johannesburg and Cape Town.

 

The post Featured: Dineo Bopape And Indulging The Poetic Elasticity And Materiality Of Things appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[#NowPlaying: ‘Music To Make Your Ears Bleed’ by Graham Paterson]]> http://10and5.com/?p=93111 2014-11-20T13:33:33Z 2014-11-20T10:00:51Z

How about some Music To Make Your Ears Bleed? If that sounds like a vibe to you, you've got Graham Paterson to thank - the Cape Town-based illustrator, graphic designer and art director at Made Agency who put this edition of #NowPlaying together.

The post #NowPlaying: ‘Music To Make Your Ears Bleed’ by Graham Paterson appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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#NowPlaying: Graham Paterson

 

How about some Music To Make Your Ears Bleed? If that sounds like a vibe to you, you’ve got Graham Paterson to thank – the Cape Town-based illustrator, graphic designer and art director at Made Agency who put this edition of #NowPlaying together. His mostly punk rock playlist features the likes of Dillinger Four, The Menzingers, None More Black, A Wilhelm Scream, Dear Landlord and New Mexican Disaster Squad. It’s seriously awesome. Give it a bash!

 

More from Graham on grahampaterson.co.za, or keep up with him on Twitter and Behance.

 

Music To Make Your Ears Bleed from between10and5 on 8tracks Radio.

 

Tracklist:

 

  1. Ode To The North American Snake Oil Distributor – Dillinger Four (C I V I L W A R)
  2. Eulogy – The Flatliners (The Great Awake)
  3. I Can’t Seem To Tell – The Menzingers (On The Impossible Past)
  4. Faux-Fire, Faux-Gold – The Hunters (Promises)
  5. Shine – Smoke Or Fire (This Sinking Ship)
  6. Driven – Crusades (The Sun is Down and The Night is Riding In)
  7. Mr. Artistic – None More Black (Icons)
  8. The March of Dissent – Hit the Switch (Domestic Tranquility & Social)
  9. I Live in Hell – Dear Landlord (Dream Home)
  10. I’d Rather Be Part of the Dyin – The Sainte Catherines (Dancing for Decadence)
  11. We Built This City! (On Debts And Booze) – A Wilhelm Scream (Career Suicide)
  12. Coughing Up Blood – New Mexican Disaster Squad (Don’t Believe)
  13. Animals And Children – Western Addiction (Cognicide)

 

More #NowPlaying:

10and5.com/series/nowplaying
8tracks.com/between10and5

 

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Rebecca Looringh Van Beeck <![CDATA[WISHLIST: All Things Intriguing from Siki Msuseni]]> http://10and5.com/?p=92648 2014-11-21T07:23:26Z 2014-11-20T07:25:17Z

As an avid lover of authentic, locally produced fashion and décor items, here’s Siki Msuseni's WISHLIST.

The post WISHLIST: All Things Intriguing from Siki Msuseni appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Image credit: Fundiswa Ntoyi

 

Siki Msuseni has an infectious smile and quirky style. She’s a stylist whose blog, All Things Intriguing, is where you can find a colourful portfolio of work in between posts of her own cool outfits and fashion obsessions. She’s always got an unusual twist to add (picture Birkenstocks with frilly socks), so we wanted to know which local designers she finds inspiration from. As an avid lover of authentic, locally produced fashion and décor items, here’s her WISHLIST:

 

1 / Maxhosa Knitwear

I have always raved about how awesome Laduma Ngxokolo’s knitwear is. Drawing inspiration from the Xhosa culture and being my good friend, I only find it fitting that I should have my own jersey too.

 

 

2 / Vukile Batyi iPhone Cover

Again another African-inspired project. I love Vukile Batyi’s iPhone covers, I just wish they were easily accessible.

 

 

3 / Indalo backpack by Inga
Who doesn’t want a wooden backpack, they’re just so cool.

 

 

4 / Pedersen & Lennard Bucket Stool
I am obsessed with the Pedersen and Lennard products, maybe it’s because I grew with the brand from day one when they only had one showroom and just a small pool of clients. Now they are curating interiors using their own products within the space. Minimalistic in their approach. I need a bucket stool for my space.

 

 

5 / Khaya Witbooi Artwork
With my love of art, I have come to align myself with Khaya Witbooi’s work. I truly appreciate. A man I would love to meet in person and tap into his frame of mind understanding how he produces such good work.

 

 

6 / Thabo Makhetha Designs
I am going to tell you numerous times, don’t sleep on this designer. Using the Sotho blanket as the main ingredients in her designs.

 

 

7 / Jane Sews leather ankle boots
I know it’s summer now and we should all be wearing open toe shoes, but Jane Sews leather booties is what I need in my life right now.

 

 

8 / Urban Mosadi backpacks
Do I really have to tell you why I love these backpacks so much? They are just so perfect.

 

 

9 / Dokter & Misses Checkas Bin
With all the mess in my room I need to clear it out using this bin as my disposer.

 

 

MORE WISHLISTS, GIFT IDEAS AND A SA STORE DIRECTORY.

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Make It New | A Showcase of the Cape’s Craft and Design]]> http://10and5.com/?p=92708 2014-11-19T12:17:33Z 2014-11-19T12:17:33Z

Make It New, a celebration of the Cape's craft and design, has found a new home and is currently showing in the Watershed at the V&A Waterfront.

The post Make It New | A Showcase of the Cape’s Craft and Design appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Make It New

Selection of furniture by Wiid Design and ceramic geometric vessels by Ceramic Factory.

 

In celebration of local creativity, The Cape Craft and Design Institute (CCDI) and the Western Cape Department of Cultural Affairs and Sports (DCAS) hosted the Make It New pop-up exhibition at the Cape Town Stadium last month. Forming part of the WDC Policy Conference and Makers + Thinkers, this 5-day affair showcased a curated selection of products, homeware and furniture by almost 200 local creatives. After deciding to extend this visual feast, Make It New found a new home and is currently on show at the recently opened Watershed at the V&A Waterfront.

 

Taking its name from the Modernists’ reaction to tradition, Make It New is a reflection on the past and a fascination with re-making it by blending the diverse creative approaches used specifically in the Cape. Hoping to create and discover new sources of inspiration by re-thinking the old, the product selection reflects local design thinking, innovation and problem solving and is displayed to draw attention to the significance of creative collaboration.

 

The exhibition is open from 10am until 7pm daily until 7 December 2014.

Entry is free.

Visit the ccdi website for more information.

 

Photo credit: Henrique Wilding.

 

Make It New

Geometric Storm Chandelier by Willowlamp and wallpaper by Robin Sprong featuring artwork by Patricia Fraser.

Make It New

Floral Wall Arrangement by Okasie Flowers.

Make It New

Africa Pinboard by Get Cork, black and white geometric vases by Ceramic Factory and cork desk lights by Wiid Design.

Make It New

Homeware by Love Milo, chair and sidetable by Gregor Jenkin and ceramic vessel by Di Marshall.

Make It New

‘Alexander The Great’ Blue Granite Table by Dawid Augustyn of D|A Design and wallpaper by Robin Sprong featuring artwork ‘The Earth’ by Marsi van de Heuvel.

Make It New

‘Alexander The Great’ Blue Granite Table by Dawid Augustyn of D|A Design.

Make It New

‘Espresso’ Lamps by Piers Mansfield-Scadden and Hex Table by Haldane Martin.

Make It New

Wallpaper by Michael Chandler, chair by Piers Mansfield-Scadden and woven basket by Moonbasket.

Make It New

Wall Mural by Michael Chandler, Nest of Hex Tables by Haldane Martin and candles by Sobeit Studio.

Make It New

Corkabitation Collection by Wiid Design and dhk architects.

Make It New

‘Living Chandelier’ collaboration by Hoi P’Loy and Opus.

 

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