Between 10 and 5 The South African creative showcase 2015-07-07T16:26:52Z http://10and5.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Phillip Obermeyer <![CDATA[Highlights from SA Menswear Week SS 15/16]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116777 2015-07-07T16:26:52Z 2015-07-07T13:09:31Z

The second instalment of South Africa's men's fashion week was held at the Cape Town Stadium the past week offering menswear designers the chance to show their latest Spring/Summer collections to the industry. These are our highlights.

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SAMW Maxhosa

 

The second instalment of South Africa’s men’s fashion week was held at the Cape Town Stadium this past week offering menswear designers the chance to show their latest Spring/Summer collections to the industry. The inaugural menswear week was held previously in the year at the V&A Waterfront, and its follow up event was yet again a great success. Here are some of our favourite looks from the shows.

 

Oath by Rich Mnisi

 

Oath’s SS collection’s graphic and youthful approach was expressed in bold colours, prints and silhouettes. The collection displayed a free flowing street edge and energetic flow throughout. Garments ranged from jackets to trousers and wide leg shorts and included an overall good variety of pieces.

 

Rich MnisiRich MnisiRich Mnisi

 

Palse Homme

 

Founder Paledi Segapo showed a clean minimalist collection focusing on classic menswear pieces by using a subtle colour pallet. Delicate lace fabrics were paired with classic menswear staples, making a soft statement towards masculinity. The styling was bold with gold makeup, casual sneakers and leather bags.

 

Palse HommePalse HommePalse Homme

 

Simon Deporres

 

Striving to create classic pieces with a sportswear feel, Simon Deporres delivered a collection that had a beautiful balance of style and functionality to it. The clothes definitely had the ‘Cape Town factor’ to them. A refined touch proved that small details matter. A good collection with a lot of retail-ready pieces.

 

Simon DeporresSimon DeporresSimonDeporres

 

Lukhanyo Mdingi 

 

Lukhanyo Mdingi’s spring/summer collection explored an all-navy look with soft delicate fabrics but maintained a strong voice in contemporary menswear. His looks had a unisex feel to them and there were some layering elements to the collection. Accessories included custom-made hats from milliner Crystal Birch and amazing bags. The collection was easy, effortless and had a wonderful flow throughout.

 

Lukhanyo Mdingi Lukhanyo Mdingi Lukhanyo Mdingi

 

Kola Kuddus

 

Channeling his Nigerian roots, Kola Kuddus showed us a vibrant collection with a modern aesthetic. The looks were created in colours such as oranges, blues and darker richer tones paired with stripes and asymmetrical details. The models looked confident, stylish and completely African, but still maintained an intentional standard. Kola’s construction and quality stood out.

 

Kola Kuddus Kola Kuddus Kola Kuddus

 

Orange Culture

 

This collection had strong Nigerian influences in it combined with more western classics. The pieces were were bold and had a luxurious feel to them. Fabrics ranged form organza to soft textured cloth, with embroidery and interesting prints. Overall the collection had an expressive feel to it ushering us into Spring with some flair.

 

Orange CultureOrange CultureOrange Culture

 

MaXhosa by Laduma 

 

Laduma Ngxokolo’s traditional Xhosa patterns made up an astounding collection of knitwear pieces. The collection had a variety of pieces ranging from trousers to shorts, to the iconic jerseys and also socks. The beautiful prints not only represent Laduma’s culture but commercially will do very well.

 

 

MaXhosa MaXhosa MaXhosa

 

Projecto Mental

 

Shunnoz Fiel and Tekasala Ma’at Nzinga’s runway quickly got interesting as it was packed with found objects and displayed a rural looking scene, which may have been a homage to Projecto Mental’s home country, Angola. The collection showcased the rude boy trend, mixing bold colours with classic menswear pieces. The models looked fresh, well groomed and had a real African sensibility to them.

 

Projecto Mental Projecto MentalProjecto Mental

 

Jenevieve Lyons

 

Combining natural elements and her signature sportswear style, Jenevieve produced a beautiful collection. The looks showcased monochromatic prints, soft tailoring and had an almost adventurous spirit to them. The clothes were cleverly layered and definitely had a South African feel to them.

 

Jenevieve Lyons Jenevieve LyonsJenevieveLyons

 

All photos courtesy of Simon Deiner / SDR Photo

www.menswearweek.co.za

 

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Salokya Nag <![CDATA[‘Small Town Girl’ | Elize Strydom Photographs the Lives of SA Teens]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116822 2015-07-07T11:14:29Z 2015-07-07T11:14:29Z

Sydney based photographer and journalist, Elize Strydom documents the intimate and poetic lives of teenage girls in SA in 'Small Town Girl'.

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Eliza Strydom

Rebecca tries to catch a crab in the creek at Nieu-Bethesda, Eastern Cape

 

Documentary photographer and ABC journalist, Elize Strydom’s ongoing photography project ‘Small Town Girl’ documents the lives of teenage girls from small towns around the world. Shot in Australia (where she grew up), South Africa (where she was supposed to grow up), and the USA (where she wanted to grow up), the lives of these teenage girls are captured in an intimate and poetic way. “It occurred to me that it really isn’t about the photos at all. It’s about relationships and connection. The camera is the ‘key’ that gives me access to the girls’ lives – it’s my reason for being there – but the experiences we share, the things we learn from each other and the reciprocal understanding we gain is the real reason and purpose. The photos are just evidence, you know?”, says Elize on her blog.

 

Having met her dad for the first time 12 years ago in South Africa, the Sydney-based photographer’s decision to bring ‘Small Town Girl’ to the country was a personal one. She stayed in SA for two and a half months where she lived with and photographed six girls all over the country. Spending time with the diverse bunch of girls, Elize got many glimpses of the life she might have had in SA had she grown up in the country. “South Africa is fascinating and wild. It’s such a young nation and so alive with possibility and promise. There’s an undeniable energy and buzz everywhere you go. It felt like the future was being negotiated and re-negotiated before my eyes. I can’t wait to go back and meet more small town girls”, says Elize.

 

The project was inspired by the photographer’s realisation of the extraordinary years between childhood and adulthood: having a home surrounded with space and silence, a mind awake with exciting possibilities and raw emotions, instead of being a grown-up with a demanding job and weighty responsibilities. For Elize, the photographs in ‘Small Town Girl’ are Elize’s memories of her adolescence, which are validated and challenged as she walks beside these teenage girls.

 

elizestrydom.carbonmade.com
instagram.com/smalltowngirlproject

 

Eliza Strydom STG
Rebecca wears her mom’s tee-shirt in a field full of prickly pear trees in Nieu-Bethesda, Eastern Cape
Small Town Girl
Mpho and her best friend fight over a text message in Jouberton, North West Province 
Small Town Girl
Mpho eats Simba chips in her backyard in Jouberton, North West ProvinceSmall Town Girl
Mpho kisses her baby cousin after a bath in Jouberton, North West Province Small Town Girl
Varoux on the farm in Eendekuil, Western Cape 
Elize Strydom Small Town Girl
Varoux’s mom plucks a goose while she separates the feathers from the down in Eendekuil, Western CapeElize Strydom Small Town Girl
Varoux and her friends at the park in Eendekuil, Western Cape
Elize Strydom Small Town Girl
Happy delivers toys to children who live in orphanages in the Valley of a Thousand Hills, Kwa-Zulu NatalElize Strydom Small Town Girl
Happy washes dishes after cooking dinner for the girls in her room at iKhethelo Children’s Village, Kwa-Zulu Natal 
Eliza Strydom
Girls take – and review – selfies at a Landsdiens camp at Hartenbos, Western Cape Eliza Strydom
Students in Consumer Studies class at an Afrikaans high school in Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Small Town Girl
Lizandri at Spur after a swimming gala in Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Small Town Girl
Mpho reads text messages from Lebogang’s phone in Jouberton, North West Province
Small Town Girl
Varoux and the farm kids braai on a Friday night in Eendekuil, Western CapeSmall Town Girl
Mpho and Lebogang walk around their neighbourhood in Jouberton, North West ProvinceSmall Town Girl
Nyameka looks at photos on a phone while her mom and sister look on in Jouberton, North West Province

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[‘Ayanda’ | A Film About Being A Woman In Contemporary South Africa]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116771 2015-07-07T07:40:00Z 2015-07-07T10:00:32Z

'Ayanda' is a film about a young South African woman who has a knack for revamping things. Emphasising her bravery, intelligence and determination, this film is a fresh and necessary perspective on femininity in modern day Africa.

The post ‘Ayanda’ | A Film About Being A Woman In Contemporary South Africa appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Click here to view the embedded video.

 

‘Ayanda’, a film written by Trish Malone and directed by Sara Blecher, premiered at the Los Angeles Film Festival on 13 June 2015 and won the coveted Jury Award there. Shot in South Africa and starring local actors Fulu Mugovhani, Jafta Mamabolo, Nthati Moshesh, Kenneth Nkosi, Sihle Xaba and Vanessa Cooke, this is an empowering film about life as a woman in modern day South Africa. Produced by Terry Pheto, Busi Sizani and Robbie Thorpe, it tells the story of Ayanda (played by Fulu Mugovhani) a young woman who has a knack for revamping things. Eight years after her father’s death his prized auto repair garage is in debt and in danger of being closed, but Ayanda steps up and tries to save it. Emphasising her bravery, intelligence and determination, this film is a fresh and necessary perspective on femininity. Sara says, “As a female team, we are proud to have made such a strong and vibrant film about women in contemporary South Africa.”

 

See ‘Ayanda’ at the 36th Durban International Film Festival from 16-26 July 2015.

The film releases at cinemas nationally on 2 October 2015.

Follow ‘Ayanda’ on Facebook for more.

 

Ayanda

Ayanda

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Ayanda

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Colourful “Beatbugs” Imagined With Face Paint in a Music Video by Krushed and Sorted]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116931 2015-07-07T07:51:11Z 2015-07-07T07:44:46Z

After waking up from a dream involving the unlikely combination of beatboxing and creatures like frogs, fish and bugs, director and music producer Fletcher Beadon set out to make it a reality.

The post Colourful “Beatbugs” Imagined With Face Paint in a Music Video by Krushed and Sorted appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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After waking up from a dream involving the unlikely combination of beatboxing and creatures like frogs, fish and bugs, director and music producer Fletcher Beadon set out to make it a reality. To transform the mouths of beatboxers Andreson Chikuse (aka Benz) and Denver Turner (aka D.Form) into crazy and colourful creatures or “Beatbugs”, he enlisted the help of make up artist and stylist Jim Raubenheimer and illustrator Rick Treweek. Additionally, the whole thing was brought together by director of photography Rowan Pybus and post-production manager Inka Kendzia (aka The Grrrl). The end result is loads of fun to watch, see what went into the process in a making of video below.

 

www.facebook.com/krushedandsorted

 

Credits:

Director: Fletcer Beadon

Featuring: Andreson Chikuse (aka Benz) and Denver Turner (aka D.Form)

Director of photography: Rowan Pybus

Make-up artist: Jim Raubenheimer

Character designer: Rick Treweek

Titles and VFX: Inka Kendzia (aka The Grrrl)

 

Beatbugs (1)

Beatbugs (4)

Beatbugs (2)

Beatbugs (3)

 

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Salokya Nag <![CDATA[‘Travel Flash’ | A Series of Illustrated Travels by Jessica Jardim-Wedepohl]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116677 2015-07-06T09:13:38Z 2015-07-07T07:00:58Z

Joburg designer and illustrator Jessica Jardim-Wedepohl records her travels around the world in the style of tattoo flash.

The post ‘Travel Flash’ | A Series of Illustrated Travels by Jessica Jardim-Wedepohl appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

 

Johannesburg designer and illustrator Jessica Jardim-Wedepohl’s super cool way of recording her travels is bound to impress you. The creative artist was lucky enough to have an opportunity to tick a few awesome places off her bucket list and started a project titled ‘Travel Flash’ to help her remember and celebrate some of the best moments in her interpretation of a tattoo flash style.

 

Jess recorded her travels or what she jokingly calls her ‘hipster pilgrimage’ to places like Toronto, Oregon, San Francisco, Moscow, Irkutsk, Kiev and Chernobyl, illustrating the food she ate, animals she encountered, and landmarks she visited. The colourful illustrations each have an accompanying banner that labels their location.

 

On her Behance, Jessica describes her experience at each place while also giving us a before-and-after look of her beautiful and bright creations. See for yourself!

 

www.behance.net/jesswedepohl

 

 

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

 

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

Travel Flash - Jess Jardim

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Salokya Nag <![CDATA[‘Waiting’ | Jason Larkin Photographs People Waiting in the Johannesburg Sun]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116615 2015-07-06T07:42:25Z 2015-07-06T11:00:10Z

Jason Larkin's 'Waiting' is a photography book which features a collection of images of people seeking shelter from the fiery Johannesburg sun.

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Jason Larkin

 

Co-published by Fourthwall Books and Photoworks, British photographer Jason Larkin’s new book titled ‘Waiting’ was launched last week in Johannesburg. The project was inspired by the photographer’s two-year stay in the golden city where he was struck by the continual reality of people waiting.

 

Internationally recognised for his long-term social documentary projects, environmental portraiture and landscape reportage, Jason’s new book features the people of Johannesburg seeking shelter from the blazing heat of the African sun by positioning themselves in the shade on pavements and at bus stops. The features of the individuals are concealed by the shade they seek, revealing only the intricacy of posture and the details of the place. Beside each image, Jason records the duration of the wait, some many hours, and disregards any reference to the purpose or the outcome of each wait.

 

The website waiting.today is a part of the project: along with photographs, it will anchor a collection of essays, poems and stories around the theme of waiting. Furthermore, Jason’s photographs will be displayed at an outdoor exhibition in Braamfontein for the month of July. The project has been supported by the SA-UK Seasons 2014 & 2015, a partnership between the Department of Arts and Culture, South Africa and the British Council.

 

jasonlarkin.co.uk

 

Read an interview with Fourthwall Books on the art of designing photography books. 

 

Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting Waiting

Waiting

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Salokya Nag <![CDATA[Behind the Scenes at SA Menswear Week SS15/16 by Neil Roberts Mayne of Bratpics420]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116784 2015-07-06T10:46:34Z 2015-07-06T10:08:26Z

Neil Roberts Mayne's playful and edgy photographs give us a glimpse of the energy behind-the-scenes at SA Menswear Week SS15/16.

The post Behind the Scenes at SA Menswear Week SS15/16 by Neil Roberts Mayne of Bratpics420 appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Neil Roberts SAMW

 

The second South African Menswear Week (SS15/16) kicked off last week on the 2nd of July and ended on the 4th. The three-day fashion event is a platform dedicated to the development and promotion of menswear within the African continent. SAMW takes place twice a year in Cape Town, showcasing the works of creative and talented designers and their brands the likes of Maxhosa by Laduma Ngoxolo, Projecto Mental and new young designers Lukhanyo Mdingi, Jenevieve Lyons and Rich Mnisi.

 

Neil Roberts Mayne of Bratpics420, whose work we featured last month, was kind enough to send us his energetic snaps giving us an exclusive glimpse of the bustling behind-the-scenes at the shows. These photos are an excellent example of his experimental photography style, playing with layers, motion and vibrant light streaks. Neil’s excitement for photography and fashion is evident in his images. Read an interview with this hard-working photographer.

 

nrm.me

 

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

Neil Roberts SAMW

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Louise McCann <![CDATA[Featured: Giant Graffiti-Style Portraits by Kilmany-Jo Liversage]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116641 2015-07-06T10:53:33Z 2015-07-06T10:00:33Z

Artist Kilmany-Jo Liversage's current focus is on large-scale, graffiti-style portraiture. We take a closer look at her distinctive style, her predominantly female subject matter, and her unique process of "ordered mark-making".

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Kilmany-Jo Liversage
‘Shina’, 2015.

 

Kilmany-Jo Liversage, also known as Orda, is a Cape Town based artist who sets out to evoke a feeling of universal familiarity in her graffiti-style portraiture. She works in a variety of media including spray paint, acrylics, and mixed media. She has exhibited extensively in South Africa and across the globe, and her work is included in numerous collections. Her current focus is on large-scale, graffiti-style portraiture. Kilmany-Jo draws inspiration from street culture and strives to depict a universal sense of the familiar, paradoxically often using complete strangers randomly picked from mass- or social media and interpreted in her mega-wattage, uber-scaled style as portrait subjects. We chat to Kilmany-Jo about how her distinctive style developed, why her subject matter is primarily female and her unique process of “ordered mark-making”.

 

Your massive installation artwork titled ‘Shina’ steals the show at the recently opened Nando’s in Mapyonya Mall, Soweto. Did the location influence your choice of portrait subject?

 

Yes. I decided to paint a strong, vibrant young girl as an inspirational message to women in Soweto. What I like about graffiti is that it’s bright, hip and talks to all ages, and combining it with traditional portraiture brings other voices. The girl I painted is actually Lupita Nyong’o, the Mexican-Kenyan born actress and film director. In 2013 she became the first Mexican and first Kenyan actress to win an Academy Award. She’s a role model for what it means to be female and to really step into your own power. My subject matter is primarily female as I feel strongly about the role women play in our society and I specifically portray the strength and femme fatalism of women in my portraits to evoke those feelings within the viewer. I think this is important in the face of abuse of women and children, which is a big social problem in South Africa.

 

This is the first time you’ve done a large-scale artwork across a multitude of canvases and the uneven installation brings a new dimension to the experience. What was the inspiration behind this approach?

 

‘Shina’ is actually made of 90 wooden Creative Blocks that are each 42x42cm. The uneven installation gives the composition the element of stipulated ‘order’ that repeats itself often in my work. It’s no coincidence that I tag the streetname ORDA throughout my work – I‘ve always had an interest in impressionistic mark-making through repetitive order-making brush marks or the recurring use of a specific material. Using the Creative Blocks as a canvas was also quite symbolic as my working relationship with Yellowwoods Art and Nando’s began when I started making artworks for them every month as part of their Creative Block initiative.

 

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
‘Shina’, 2015, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board across 90 creative blocks each 42cmx42cm, total installation 6,6m x 3,5m. The artwork is on exhibition at Nando’s Maponya Mall in Soweto, Johannesburg.

 

While your artworks have a distinctly street art feel about them, you use a mix of media in your work, including acrylics, and you often paint on canvas. Is there a long history of street artists working on canvas? Are there any iconic artists amongst them who stand out for you as inspirational?

 

To my knowledge, Basqiuat (AKA Samo) was one of the first artists to experiment with street art on canvas in the 1970s. Banksy kind of started the trend that street art could be interpreted onto canvas and be sought after in the art world. Inspirational street artists for me are Shepard Fairey, Miss Van, Connor Harrington, Space Invader, Roa and JR Artist.

 

Tell us about how you use Orda-making and mark-making in your more contemporary graffiti-style works? Also, can you tell us a little more about how this has changed over time? In your earlier works you used far more tagging than you do now, while in your more recent works you use repetitive vertical drizzles of paint.

 

My ordered mark-making started with ‘Media chopsticks’ where I cut up hundreds of wooden chopsticks and created macro-biospheres with them. These works are now hanging in the University of Technology in Pretoria. Working with different media allows me to explore the fascination towards an ordered composition be it through repetitive mark-making or application of a material. At a stage I worked with silk ribbons and made tapestry like works with hundreds of silken strips. The process of application and the build up of many layers is what’s important to me. This repetitive element is now used in my mark-making on canvas, and it’s all about creating many layers. I first start tagging and then paint a layer of acrylic colour to mute the tagging. Then I start the process over again and start building the portrait within the process. Over time the mark-making has evolved from busy spray painted tags to vertical and horizontal drippings as these mimic the architectural buildings of the urban landscape.

 

Going back to your distinctive street style, how did you first get into the street art scene? 

 

In 2005 I was awarded a UNESCO Aschberg-Medellin Residency in Colombia, South America. This was where the street art bug first bit me. I was given an opportunity to paint murals on the street and instantly fell in love with this style. I was an art teacher at a school in Cape Town for eight years and found the ‘scratchitti’ on school desks as my inspiration and experimented with this style in my paintings. My breakaway from creating ordered artworks through ribbon and wood made me want to be freer in style and tagging my street name onto canvas allowed me to create a new style of order through mark-making.

 

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board 1500 x 1500cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Pavilion, Durban.

 

Was the street art in Colombia ‘of its place’ in any way? And as you’ve explored here and abroad are there particular street artworks that stand out in your memory as exceptional?

 

Yes, the street art in Colombia stood out as being subversive and that was because of the social injustices that were due to the drug-related war being fought there. Internationally, I’ve always liked Belgian artist Roa’s large murals of animals wherever they appear in the world. The street art in Bristol in the UK really made a big impression on me. Street art is alive there in a big way – it adorned every old building in the city. By contrast, street art in South Africa is hugely underrated and mostly seen as a criminal act. Tagging in and around Woodstock in Cape Town expresses some strong messages about government inefficiencies, which has its place with what is happening in SA today.

 

South African street art that stands out for me? Faith47’s poetic visual language has always been inspirational to me, wherever I see it. There are works that adorn huge buildings in the Maboneng Precinct in Joburg including works by Roa and Faith47, while Freddy Sam’s large painting of Mandela as a young boxer is another inspirational visual message.

 

Creating installation art and travelling locally and internationally seem to go hand-in-hand for you. How does the experience of travelling to different places influence the work you create?

 

Traveling for an artist is essential as it broadens one’s aesthetic knowledge. Meeting new people and making art in public spaces creates an amazing dialect between artist and viewer.

 

A great deal of your body of work is exhibited in Nando’s restaurants across the globe. Nando’s isn’t an art gallery and it isn’t a public space as such, but it does get 80 million visitors internationally per year, so that’s a lot of human traffic. What does this mean to you? Does exhibiting in a fast food chain have any impact on your ‘street cred’?

 

I’m proud to provide art for the everyday person and to provide inspirational messages through my artworks. I started with the Nando’s Art Initiative as a young artist doing Creative Blocks. Nando’s has supported me throughout my career and has taken me places I never thought I’d go to make art including Washington and Maryland in the USA and Toronto, Canada. What sets Nando’s apart from most fast food chains is that it prides itself on exhibiting quality South African Art by emerging young artists in their stores around the globe. Nando’s also creates thought-provoking ads that get the message across regarding our political and social injustices. Street food is what the everyday person eats so if my art can be appreciated by such people, well then I’m gaining my street cred right there.

 

Do you exhibit with other galleries locally or internationally? And are you still making independent street art?

 

Yes, in Cape Town I’m represented by Worldart and in Joburg by Lizamore and Associates. I’ve just had a solo show at the Hay Hill Gallery in London and will be represented by Worldart at the Moniker Art Fair in London in October 2015. I created a mural in Vienna, Austria in 2013 for a private residence and will possibly be making a mural in London soon.

 

See more of Kilmany-Jo’s work on her website.

 

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 180 x 150cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Central Kitchen, Johannesburg and this image has also appeared on the cover of Nando’s restaurant menus.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board 1500 x 1500cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Pavilion, Durban.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board 1500 x 1500cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Pavilion, Durban.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board 1500 x 1500cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Pavilion, Durban.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board 1500 x 1500cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Pavilion, Durban.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Urba, 2013, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 180 x 150cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Central Kitchen, Johannesburg.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Lahe, 2013, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 180 x 100cm. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Central Kitchen, Johannesburg.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled triptych, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 1200 x 1455mm each. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Central Kitchen, Johannesburg.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Different elements from Kilmany’s Untitled triptych was used on Nando’s freshly launched in-house stationery.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 1100 x 2400. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Queensburgh, Durban.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Untitled, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 1100 x 2400. The artwork is exhibited at Nando’s Queensburgh, Durban.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Washington Graffiti, 2011, Aerosol spray and acryilic paint on board, 3.25 x 4.5m; 3.25 x 5.3; 3.25 x 2.2m at Nando’s Bethesda Row, Washington DC, USA.

9uwEVED3kdREXcf7nNjtjGMmE4_fhEVRSoGoPj_YEZI
Woodbridge Graffiti, 2014, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board, 5.2 x 2.3m; 5.2 x 3.75m, a portrait of world- renowned graffiti artist Faith47 at Nando’s Woodbridge, Virginia, USA.

Kilmany-Jo Liversage
Toronto Graffiti, 2013, Aerosol spray and acrylic paint on board 2400 x 2200cm. The large-scale graffiti portrait at Canada’s first flagship restaurant in Nando’s Bay Street in Toronto. 

 

More about Nando’s Art Initiative.

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Stiebeuel’s ‘One + Two’ Winter 2015 Capsule Collection of Menswear Staples]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116653 2015-07-05T19:31:58Z 2015-07-06T08:00:13Z

The new 'One + Two' capsule W15 collection from minimalist menswear brand Stiebeuel is focused on staple items with attention to small details in construction and interesting silhouettes.

The post Stiebeuel’s ‘One + Two’ Winter 2015 Capsule Collection of Menswear Staples appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Stiebeuel (1)

 

Similarly to their ‘Introspection’ SS15 range released late last year, the Winter 2015 capsule collection from minimalist menswear brand Stiebeuel is focused on staple items with attention to small details in construction and interesting silhouettes. Titled ‘One + Two’ to suggest the drop of another range before the turn of the season, the W15 collection comes with supporting leather pouches and cardholders.

 

“Stiebeuel’s work as of late has been an effort to fashion an increased sense of tension and revision in each piece, making the sum of its parts collaborative, thoughtful and effortless,” says founder Nico Nigrini. The ‘One + Two’ lookbook was shot at Palm Black Trading Co., a collaborative space where Stiebeuel is nestled administratively and has their showroom/point of retail.

 

Along with their W15 range Stiebeuel launched a website and online store: www.stiebeuel.com

 

Credits:

Photographer: Ian Engelbrecht
Art Director: Derick Van Wijk
Model: Nicolaas Van Reenen

 

Nico Nigrini

Nico Nigrini

Stiebeuel (4)

Ian Engelbrecht One + Two

Ian Engelbrecht One + Two

Nico Nigrini

Ian Engelbrecht One + Two

Ian Engelbrecht One + Two

Stiebeuel (10)

Ian Engelbrecht One + Two

 

The post Stiebeuel’s ‘One + Two’ Winter 2015 Capsule Collection of Menswear Staples appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[A Portrait of Lubumbashi, DRC: Petite Noir’s Music Video for ‘Down’]]> http://10and5.com/?p=116720 2015-07-05T19:29:29Z 2015-07-06T07:00:10Z

Shot by Max Mogale the music video for Petite Noir's track 'Down' acts as a travel diary of sorts, documenting his trip to his hometown of Lubumbashi.

The post A Portrait of Lubumbashi, DRC: Petite Noir’s Music Video for ‘Down’ appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Petite Noir describes his upcoming album La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful as the first full expression of Noirwave. This, more of a concept than a specific sound, encompasses a ‘new African aesthetic’. Released prior to the album’s official launch ‘Down’ gives us a small taste of what to expect. The song came out towards the end of June and was accompanied by a video filmed in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Shot by Max Mogale with creative direction by Rharha Nembhard it acts as a travel diary of sorts, documenting Yannick Ilunga’s trip to his hometown of Lubumbashi. Footage of Rharha and Yannick dancing playfully is interspersed with locals standing as though they’re about to have their photograph taken, forming a beautiful portrait of the place and its people.

 

La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful will be released on September 11, 2015.

 

petitenoirmusic.com

 

Petite Noir 'Down' (1)

Petite Noir 'Down' (2)

Petite Noir 'Down' (3)

Petite Noir 'Down' (4)

 

The post A Portrait of Lubumbashi, DRC: Petite Noir’s Music Video for ‘Down’ appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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