Between 10 and 5 The South African creative showcase 2014-10-31T19:03:24Z http://10and5.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Oh Wow! – Rising Stars, Chocolate Skulls and a Series of Non-Events.]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90877 2014-10-31T13:45:31Z 2014-10-31T13:45:31Z

Today we’re looking at some gorgeous pieces by up-and-coming fashion designers, an illustrated series of awkward “non-events” and a ceramics range that makes us crave licorice. Oh, and since it’s Halloween, we’ve ended off with a bit of creepy goodness. […]

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Today we’re looking at some gorgeous pieces by up-and-coming fashion designers, an illustrated series of awkward “non-events” and a ceramics range that makes us crave licorice. Oh, and since it’s Halloween, we’ve ended off with a bit of creepy goodness.

 

ONE – The ELLE Rising Star Design Award finalists, photographed by Lee Moami.

 

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Production: Tarryn Oppel | Hair: Alet Viljoen | Make-up: Shahnaz Cola | Model: Yolanda at ICE

 

See ‘Geometrics’, the winning collection by Tamara Chérie Dyson.

 

TWO – Following on from his Instagram exhibition, ‘Broken Foot Drawings‘, Koos Groenewald is presenting ‘#AWKS / A series of non-events’ in what is possibly the world’s first Instagram auction. The drawings will be up on his account on Tuesday, 4 November from 7 – 9pm with a dutch bidding system in the comments section.

 

AWKS by Koos Groenewald (10)

AWKS by Koos Groenewald (1)

AWKS by Koos Groenewald (6)

AWKS by Koos Groenewald (8)

AWKS by Koos Groenewald (3)

 

THREE – The Graffica Collection by Klomp Ceramics.

 

Klomp ceramics (9)

Klomp ceramics (1)

Klomp ceramics (8)

Klomp ceramics (10

Klomp ceramics (5)

 

FOUR – For the 2014 release of Creative Cloud, Adobe brought together artists from all over the world to remix their logo into a collaborative mosaic. This photograph is Justin Dingwall‘s contribution to the project.

 

Justin Dingwall (1)

Justin Dingwall (2)

Justin Dingwall (3)

Adobe Creative Cloud Mosaic

 

FIVE - Boys Who Cry photographed by Steve Marais for Gaschette.

 

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SIX – The Wander. Collection by Cape Town-based graphic designer and illustrator Maria Magdalena van Wyk.

“The limited edition Wander.doodle range is a series of snippets from my ordinary life made extraordinary through lines of ink. Only 50 prints of each doodle will be available for sale around the world. Each drawing has a special story, poem or song attached to it and some celebrate strong influential women. It showcases my personal adventure as an illustrator.”

 

WG0004 Frida - Maria Magdalena 2

WG0001 Winona - Maria Magdalena 2

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SEVEN – Skull-shaped chocolates by Honest Chocolate.

 

Chocolate skulls by Honest Chocolate

 

EIGHT –  Am I Collective‘s October desktop wallpaper, the Halloween edition. Download it here.

 

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NINE – The Duchess of Death by MUTI.

 

MUTI

 

P.S. Listen to Boogie, Amber Smith’s Halloween-themed playlist!

 

More Oh Wow!

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Featured: Upbeat Paintings by Colourist Cathy Layzell]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90724 2014-10-31T12:26:04Z 2014-10-31T12:25:20Z

  With an energy that is at once rich and refined, Cathy Layzell‘s paintings are a symphony of layered mark making and plays of light. Described as a colourist, the Cape Town based artist is primarily interested in the ways […]

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Cascade

Cascade

 

With an energy that is at once rich and refined, Cathy Layzell‘s paintings are a symphony of layered mark making and plays of light. Described as a colourist, the Cape Town based artist is primarily interested in the ways that colours interact with each other. Whether working with large flat areas or complex mixtures she endeavours to make the colours on the canvas breathe, to create space and movement through the dynamic interplay of lines and shapes. Curious about her background and the whimsical paintings she creates, we spoke to Cathy to learn more.

 

What sort of environment did you grow up in?

 

I grew up in Kloof (KZN) in the leafy green suburbs. We lived next to the school sports field. It was a very free outdoor life; I could ride my bike everywhere and catch the bus to the bottom of West Street and then skateboard up to North beach to check out the surfers…I mean…surf! My mum had green fingers and our garden was a tropical paradise.

 

When did you realise that a career in the arts was something you wanted to, and could, pursue?

 

I wanted to work in the arts for as long as I can remember, but it took some time before I was brave enough to leave gainful employment. I grew up thinking that if one wanted a career in the arts one ought to get training in something useful like graphic design or textile design. I applied to study Graphic Design at Durban Tech but at the last minute changed to Fine Art at Rhodes University.

 

Though you completed your BA Fine Art Degree at Rhodes in 1994, it was only in 2002 that you committed to painting full-time. Tell us more about your journey so far, and how you’ve come to be where you are today…

 

After my degree I moved to London. My friends who had studied Graphic Design all had fabulous jobs in advertising agencies and I was quite jealous. I was a waitress for a while and then a nanny. Those ‘humble’ jobs gave me time to explore a hundred other things. I had studied English Literature at Rhodes and had always loved books and so I applied for and got my first job in publishing with Dorling Kindersley. Our offices were in Covent Garden, which meant that I could go to the National Gallery in my lunch break! I worked in publishing for about 6 years eventually re-training as a book designer and finally becoming an Art Director.

 

When I was 29, my father died, and I had an early mid-life crisis and decided it was time to paint again. I took a shared studio in London for a while and painted on the weekends. I then met a chef at a bus stop and was lured to the Victoria Hotel on the Holkham Estate. I lived on the remote North Norfolk coast of East Anglia for the next 6 years. I began working part-time for Miv Watts (the fabulous interior designer) who gave me my first opportunity to exhibit. I also spent the summer of 2003 working at the Painting School of Montmirail in France (near Toulouse) – as a waitress and taxi driver and I returned to that area for many summers thereafter to paint.

 

I moved back to South Africa in 2008 and had my first show here at the Irma Stern Museum in 2009. Last year I did a year’s post-graduate study at Michaelis School of Fine Art under the nurturing supervision of Virginia MacKenny, which set me on my current path.

 

Twice as fast

Twice as fast

 

How has your experience in design and art direction continued to influence you in your artistic practise?

 

I think that all image making must have the fundamental components of good design; a balance between areas of visual excitement and areas of rest. In book design the white spaces (the negative spaces) are as important as the typography and images. The publishing world required me to be quite organised as I was often juggling a number of jobs at the same time and working towards a deadline. Being able to design my own cards and invitations has been really helpful over the years too. I also learned quite a bit about marketing, sales and the importance of good presentation. I love working with photographers and printers. I worked on a number of gardening books. A highlight was working with Howard Sooley, an amazing gentle man who had taken heart-wrenching photos of Derek Jarmen and his garden at Dungeness. The ‘garden’ has remained a favourite theme in my work. I love projects.

 

What does your process typically entail?

 

I’m constantly collecting images. I do admin in the mornings and get to the studio about 11am and then I potter. I look at stuff, I turn my paintings around, I look and look and then I mix a palette. I like to start with a generous amount of paint and I spend quite some time pre-mixing delicious colours. I usually work on a few paintings at the same time. I work best in the afternoon and I like to work into the night; I kind of accelerate into the day.

 

There’s a wonderful sense of playfulness to your work. What do you think accounts for this?

 

I’ve spent half my life learning to draw and paint figuratively and it has been rather a joy and relief to finally throw off those shackles and embrace pure abstraction. These days I really feel like the paintings paint themselves; I start somewhere and end up somewhere else entirely. I make a mark here and that makes me want to make a mark somewhere else. I put a colour down and then that makes me want to put another colour down somewhere else…I have no idea beforehand what the painting is going to end up like and every day is an adventure and full of surprise, and flops, and then little resurrections.

 

Can you tell us about what it is that you explore or express through your paintings? Are there any themes that seem to occur, or reoccur?

 

I started out as a still life painter and I suppose that the age-old idea of ‘memento-mori’ re-occurs; the cycles of life and death in nature.

 

How has the act of painting changed the way you look at (or think about) things?

 

Paintings have their own time and you can’t force an outcome. Expectations are rehearsals for disappointment. Painting is a kind of surrender; a constant balancing act between decision making and letting go. For all the lists and plans and grand schemes that I have in my head, when the paint is ‘flying’ something else just takes over. I’ve had to learn to trust that something else.

 

Flying so far

Flying so far

 

How important to you is the physical space you create in?

 

Very. I need natural light and space. My paintings start to reflect the environment around me and so I need to choose and create those environments carefully. I like to have visual stimulus around me. At the beginning of the year I was very lucky to be the resident artist at Luvey ‘n Rose then on Rose Street in the Bo-Kaap (now moved to Loop Street). The architectural grid, colour and chaos of the Bo-Kaap, is reflected in my recent work. My new studio in Woodstock has amazing kaleidoscopic views over rooftops and is a daily delight.

 

What do you love most about what you do? Alternately, what aspects do you find challenging?

 

I love the freedom of my days and not having anyone breathing down my neck. I like the spontaneity of my studio practice. I like to keep things open ended. I tend to prefer starting things to finishing them. When I get stuck on something I usually just start something else. I find exhibitions challenging because they require closure but they are also a good time to reflect on the fruits on one’s labour.

 

What are some of your current inspirations?

 

There is so much amazing stuff everywhere these days; design, animation, movies, magazines, art, the internet, art blogs…there is really just a glut of inspiration. Right now I’m in love with the works of John Murray and Paul Senyol.

 

Your solo show, Connect the Dots, opened at the Casa Labia cultural centre on 25 October. Tell us about the paintings you’re exhibiting?

 

The paintings are all about movement; strange shapes, dots and dashes flying through space. I was playing with mixing very gestural brush strokes with more graphic, flat and iconic shapes. As I layered colour upon colour strange shapes starting to emerge which I would choose to isolate or animate by pumping up the colour contrasts or hardening or softening the edges, flattening certain areas, dropping shadows or repeating patterns. The paintings are very upbeat.

 

What else are you working on at the moment, and what’s next?

 

I’m working towards the group shows Equus at the Cavalli Estate, Seeking Eden at Casa Labia and Golden Haze at Salon 91. I then start working on a two-man show with Paul Senyol at Salon 91 (on Kloof Street), which will take place towards the middle of next year.

 

www.cathylayzell.com

 

Marmalade and magpie

Marmalade and magpie

Spell of propitiation 2

Spell of propitiation 2

Candy 3

Candy 3

Candy 4

Candy 4

To capture with the sky

To capture with the sky

Remembrance

Remembrance

Connect the dots 3

Connect the dots 3

Connect the dots 4

Connect the dots 4

Twister

Twister

Water

Water

Garden of earthly delights

Garden of earthly delights

My house has many mansions

My house has many mansions

Raven and writing desk

Raven and writing desk

Map of hours

Map of hours

Unstopppable wish

Unstopppable wish

 

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Alix-Rose Cowie <![CDATA[Tamara Chérie Dyson wins the 2014 ELLE Rising Star Design Award]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90869 2014-10-31T10:22:34Z 2014-10-31T10:22:34Z

This year's ELLE Rising Star Design Award finalists sent their beautiful collections down the runway this week at AFI Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Africa. The winner of the ELLE and MRP competition was announced as the incredibly talented Tamara Chérie Dyson.

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Tamara-Cherie-Dyson

 

This year’s ELLE Rising Star Design Award finalists sent their beautiful collections down the runway this week at AFI Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Africa. The winner of the ELLE and MRP competition was announced as the incredibly talented Tamara Chérie Dyson who receives an amazing opportunity to kick-start her career in fashion with her own collection in collaboration with MRP.

 

Titled ‘Geometrics’, Tamara’s winning collection features contrasting textures and a combination of structural and fluid silhouettes with a neutral colour palette. She says, ‘My womenswear collection showcases discreet indulgence, carefully considered design, an underlying minimalistic approach, and a flawless aesthetic – a balanced sense of beauty emerges through simple perfection.’

 

ELLE’s editor, Emilie Gambade described Tamara’s range as impeccably designed and executed adding, “Her hunger and drive from the get-go until the very end showed a determination that we were looking for in our Rising Star winner.’

 

MRP trend director and Rising Star judge Joanne Frédéric said, ‘Tamara blew us away with her refined and sophisticated collection. Her innovation in developing fabrics locally was definitely a standout element for us. Her solid and well-thought through business plan set Tamara apart. She will no doubt show the global market what African design talent is all about.’

 

Tamara will have the opportunity to redesign a predetermined range in collaboration with MRP, which will be sold in selected MRP stores. She also receives a cash prize of R30 000 from MRP to help launch her career and the opportunity to complete a mentorship programme at the MRP head office in Durban, where she will be exposed to the complete retail cycle. In addition, Tamara will join ELLE for a two-week mentorship with the fashion team and ELLE editor Emilie Gambade, and receive an extensive Regenesys Business School mentorship programme and business coaching. Tamara will also have the opportunity to show at AFI Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in Johannesburg in 2015 and receive R7 000 from MRP towards the cost of creating the range.

 

www.facebook.com/tamaracheriedysondesign

 

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara Cherie Dyson

SDR Photo

Tamara-Cherie-Dyson

Photo: Niquita Bento

Tamara-Cherie-Dyson

Photo: Niquita Bento

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Toya Delazy’s ‘Forbidden Fruit’ Music Video Directed by Kyle Lewis]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90814 2014-10-31T08:26:27Z 2014-10-31T09:00:36Z

Arcade Content's Kyle Lewis directed a bold music video for "Forbidden Fruit", the debut single off Toya Delazy's new album, Ascension. The music video has generated a lot of commentary in the context of anti-gay politics in Africa.

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This Tuesday KwaZulu-Natal-born singer/songwriter Toya Delazy released her second album, Ascension. Following this a music video directed by Arcade Content‘s Kyle Lewis was released for the album’s debut single, “Forbidden Fruit”.

 

On the personal significance the song holds for her Toya shares that, “You love who you love. This life has no rules, there is no instruction manual, we don’t live to find ourselves, we live to create ourselves…” Known for working with striking visuals, Kyle’s visual articulation of “Forbidden Fruit” holds nothing back and since its release, the music video has generated a lot of commentary in the context of anti-gay politics in Africa.

 

Ascension, Toya says, “is about rising as a person, as a nation, as humanity, through knowing, growing the inner wealth, and becoming.” Purchase the album on iTunes and find more from Toya on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Forbidden-Fruit-5

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[A Fashion Film and Stills Series for Rayne’s SS14 Capsule Collection]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90801 2014-10-31T08:16:42Z 2014-10-31T08:16:42Z

This week Rayne released a series of stills by Steve Marais and a short film by Jonathan Pinkhard to showcase its super luxe SS14 capsule collection.

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This week Rayne released a series of stills by Steve Marais and a short film by Jonathan Pinkhard to showcase its super luxe SS14 capsule collection.

 

The talented lady behind the label, Jessica Rayne, uses the existing craftsmanship and quality of original vintage garments as the base with which to work her magic – transforming them into pieces that are modern, and completely one of a kind.

 

“When creating unique pieces for the SS14 range, it was important to me to keep things cohesive,” says Jessica, who focused on black, embellishment and texture – three things she tends to gravitate towards when it comes to design. “Luxury always comes into play with my work through the quality of fabric and detail, but for the look of this range I focused on a street style, almost androgynous and minimalist approach.”

 

The soundtrack used in the video (Young Hot Ebony by Fatheraintshit) was a big inspiration which guided the styling and feel of the stills series and the film. “We wanted to hone in on the idea of chilling at home during the summertime, feeling fresh and glamorous,” Jessica says. “The focus was mostly on luxurious pieces being worn every day, even at home, which for me is the height of sophistication.”

 

www.rayne.co.za

 

Credits:

 

Stylist: Jessica Rayne
M.U.A: Tiffany Wilson
Model: Nandy Alexander
Film: Jonathan Pinkhard
Stills: Steve Marais

 

Rayne SS14 shot by Steve Marais (3)

Rayne SS14 shot by Steve Marais (2)

Rayne SS14 shot by Steve Marais (4)

Rayne SS14 shot by Steve Marais (1)

Rayne SS14 shot by Steve Marais (5)

 

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Layla Leiman <![CDATA[Featured: Wild Cat Street Art by Sonny]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90760 2014-10-30T09:59:44Z 2014-10-30T12:00:29Z

Relative newcomer, Sonny, is the street artist responsible for the bright new murals of wild cats that have leapt into the Jozi skyline.

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Sonny

 

Have you noticed the bright new murals of wild cats that have leapt into the Jozi skyline? These bold paintings are the work of British-born South Africa based street artist, Sonny. A relative newcomer to the street art scene, Sonny is quickly gaining attention for his distinctive and imaginative style, and the commissions are rolling in. Look out for a new mural going up in Braamfontein soon!

 

When did you first start painting, and what made you want to take your art to the streets?

 

I started painting about 3 years ago. I used to only do the odd pencil drawing and then got an urge for colour so I just tried to figure it all out. Still learning…

 

Has your style changed over time? How have you honed and developed it?

 

Yes tremendously. I used to draw manga style characters in pencil and really loved Japanese work. When I started learning colour I then started adding some sort of fantasy elements into my work with influence from the amazing work of Boris Vallejo. From there I guess I must of got a bit side tracked by realism and colour. Never really liking too much of what I did I started playing around with my style, mixing the fantasy and realism elements into my more modern style with some geometric patterns and line work. I’ve kind of settled on a style for now…but it’ll always evolve.

 

With a passion for street art and big painting I’ve just pushed my mural sizes and will probably continue to do so…it’s pretty fun.

 

Are there recurring themes and motifs in your work? What are they and how have they developed?

 

Not in the past really, mostly each commissioned piece I’ve done has had its own individual theme. I really haven’t been established long enough to have had recurring themes in my own artwork, it’s been evolving too much while establishing a style I’m happy with. My next project, a solo exhibit, has a recurring theme around animal conservation but I’ll talk about that closer to the time.

 

Can you take us through your creative process…

 

Well it all starts with an idea inspired by some event or thought, I let this develop in my head for a while until I get a concept and I know what to paint. I then get to a computer where I sketch and colour the idea…from there on the wall it goes.

 

Sonny Sonny Sonny

 

What’s the inspiration behind the series of works you’re busy with in Jozi?

 

The city looks a bit rough around the edges; I feel a bit of paint in the right places may spruce things up a bit, what ye think?

 

In what ways does the city inspire and influence your work?

 

Joburg city has a crazy vibe; it’s really raw and diverse, particularly where I did these last murals. The Maboneng precinct is a hub of creative, of arts, fashion, film and the like with upmarket bars and restaurants, but just down the road you see a poor man dragging his world through the streets. It’s mad and contradictory. The city is a crazy place to watch from 15m up…a lot goes on. It showed me the city in a sort of live stop motion film. So I guess this all influences the work in some way. The happiness in the people’s faces in the streets during the process left an imprint on my mind and has motivated me to do more.

 

My leopard mural ‘the leap’ was inspired by the craziness and chaos of the city, where this godly animal jumps out of the wall, breaking free to roam in a land where it once did before it was taken over by bricks and concrete.

 

In what ways does the subject matter of your art respond and interplay with the urban setting it is located in?

 

Well, the two murals “the leap” and “the break” are both forming/morphing in some way and are breaking free into the city. The tiger is morphing in the clouds then takes shape and form as it breaches into the air of the city. You can see it from the highway as it comes over the yard into the street.

 

Then the leopard was inspired by the city and its space, as it’s breaking free from the chaotic patterns that represent the city. Also an unintentional interaction between murals happened, seen by photographer Peter Primich who caught a shot of the leopard seemingly leaping into the impala drinking water in Freddy Sam’s mural across the way.

 

Sonny Sonny Sonny

 

Are there trends in street art? If so, what are some of the current things you’re noticing locally and internationally?

 

Trends? I don’t think so, art is all about the individual and everybody seems to do their own thing from what I see. The local scene is small yet growing, where as the international scene is vast…there are lots of cool artists out there all doing their own thing.

 

Is the Jozi street art scene distinct in any way?

 

JHB city is pretty notorious…so there’s an edge to it I guess and street artists that get a chance at it take full advantage. It’s growing though.

 

Which artists’ work do you admire and why?

 

Locally I admire street artist Faith47 and Dal East, they’re both locally based and their individual styles are so unique; they’re doing awesome stuff internationally for the love of art!

 

Internationally, lately I dig Case’s work from the Maclaim Crew, his photorealism with a spray can is next level. Otherwise people like el mac, Aryz, INTI, Hopare, Sainer, Fintan Magee and others all give me inspiration with their awesome, unique style.

 

What’s next for you?

 

Next, I’m doing a few other street murals but I’m mainly working on my first solo exhibition “To The Bone”, a mixture of murals, canvass work and real animal skulls. I will hopefully complete it early next year…

 

www.sonnyonline.com

Follow Sonny on Facebook

 

Sonny Sonny SonnySonnySonny

 

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[Featured: Nolan Oswald Dennis | Mapping a history, writing a present and tracing a future]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90691 2014-10-30T11:11:59Z 2014-10-30T11:00:32Z

  Born in Zambia and currently based in Johannesburg, Nolan Oswald Dennis works in drawing, painting, installation, space, time and memory. Though research-based, his work emerges as a reaction – finding its form as he tries to process his thoughts […]

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Resources study

Resources study

 

Born in Zambia and currently based in Johannesburg, Nolan Oswald Dennis works in drawing, painting, installation, space, time and memory. Though research-based, his work emerges as a reaction – finding its form as he tries to process his thoughts and interests, which often relate in some way to (South) African history, popular memory and information systems.

 

To learn more we spoke to Nolan about his intentions and approach to making art, his interest in social fictions and what he believes about the future, the present and the past.

 

What type of environment did you grow up in?

 

I was born in Zambia to parents exiled from Apartheid South Africa. I moved to South Africa in the early 90s and in 1995 my family settled in Midrand, a semi-industrial suburb on the fringes of Johannesburg (it sits between Joburg and Pretoria thus MIDrand). My house was the last house before the veld that used to lie between Johannesburg and Pretoria. The final frontier. The environment was a mixture of abandoned construction sites, unfinished houses and small farms/small dreams. These days the farms and bush have mostly been replaced with medium density townhouses, corporate headquarters, amashisanyama, carwashes and the largest mosque in the Southern hemisphere.

 

When did you realise that a career as an artist was something you wanted to, and could, pursue?

 

I am still working out whether being an artist is something I want to, and can pursue.

 

How have you gone about this? Tell us more about your journey so far…

 

Drawing has always been a way for me to process boredom, unbelonging and frustration with my surroundings. In 2009 Fuzzy Slipperz and I started an art group called Mafuta, which was a great construct to investigate ideas about what types of work I was interested in – particularly in public art. I became obsessively preoccupied with (South) African history, memory and information systems. At some point I enrolled at Wits and got a degree in Architecture which drew me towards installation as a medium. I began hanging out at the Keleketla! Library at the Drill Hall in Hillbrow and engaging with socially oriented, critical practices. The relationships I made through Keleketla! have had a big influence on my work. Through that space I began working with The Brother Moves On, testing combinations of performance and drawing. I also did an open office residency at VANSA earlier this year.

 

What are you influenced and inspired by?

 

In 2009 my housemates were a brother and sister who would do something like this: they would argue about the merits of Mbeki’s recall by evoking Ghost in the Shell, the Treatment Action Campaign, Octavia E. Butler, three six Mafia, the Kenilworth Spar, The Sandman, WWE wrestling, Cowboy Bebop, Wu-Tang, Lesilo, Ronald Suresh Roberts, Naruto, Bram Fischer ad infinitum. This way of moving between fiction and fact, with the blurring of time, space and authority in their construction of a South African subjectivity completely changed my view of what is going on here in this place, and how I relate to it.

 

I’ve been listening to Phillip Tabane and Malombo since I heard Ra talk about them on Soundcloud, I’m always trying to find more Keoropetse Kgosistile poems, JL Dube’s uJeqe- intsila kaShaka, Ghalil Islam’s Fire in The Unnameable Country, Black Audio Film Collective, Cuss group, Euridice Kala, Hac-One.

 

Speculative study 001

Speculative study 001

Speculative study 002

Speculative study 002

 

How would you describe your style or aesthetic, and how has this developed since you first started out?

 

I’m not too concerned with describing my style/aesthetic. I would rather think about intentions. When I was younger I was really into early New York graffiti and badly drawn comics, cartoons and monsters like Roman Dirge’s Lenore, Jhnonen Vasquez’ Invader Zim, and Dub from tube on SABC. I also wanted to be a writer, in the graffiti sense as well as the literary sense.

 

I tend to do a lot of different types of work because a lot of my work is a reaction, trying to process specific things I am interested in at specific times. These interests have mostly been around questions of popular memory, sanctioned history and trying to escape the limitations of my ongoing miseducation. I’m not particularly good at using colour, so my work is generally monochrome for now.

 

Elements studies, 2013

Elements studies, 2013

Elements studies, 2013

Elements studies, 2013

Elements study, 2013

Elements study, 2013

Elements study, 2013

Elements study, 2013

 

How do you approach the art making process? Do you prefer to create in a manner that’s quite spontaneous or, alternately, one that’s pre-planned and well thought out?

 

My work is very research orientated, in a sense it’s totally pre-planned, but up to a certain point and after that I try to let go and hope for the best. My work emerges from things I’m thinking about anyway, for my own non-productive purposes, so art making is almost a by-product of other interests. I am quite pedantic, so in reaction, I constantly try to avoid too much planning of the actual visual element and rather let the ‘thing’ emerge from the action of creating it, in this way any object at the end is more of a process work or a study, for a better next time. I tend to avoid doing compositional sketches where possible.

 

You’ve expressed an interest in ‘aspects of social fiction’ and the ‘collapse of social certainty’. What does this mean to you?

 

I’m interested in creating analogues of entire fields of knowledge, as ways to question the dimensions of specific narratives about (South) Africa, like Borges’ map that is so detailed it is the same size as the country and thus utterly useless and left to disintegrate.

 

Ludwig Wittgenstein said “My propositions serve as elucidations in the following way: anyone who understands me eventually recognizes them as nonsensical, when he has used them—as steps—to climb beyond them. (He must, so to speak, throw away the ladder after he has climbed up it.) He must transcend these propositions, and then he will see the world aright.”

 

I’m interested in the social fictions we have created in South Africa since the fall of the Apartheid. The rainbow nation is an obvious example of a fiction we created in order to pursue a particular sense of social stability/certainty. That social certainty was built around notions of reconciliation, that we can hold different colours (historical-political agendas) together in a curved unity like a rainbow. That unity was challenged by the simultaneous idea of two-economies: South Africa as a country with two nations, one white and rich and the other black and poor, a dichotomy. To some extent the story of Madiba’s rainbow nation has been sufficiently discredited to consider it a collapsed certainty, we can’t rely on it, so we have new competing fictions emerging – the idea of economic freedom fighters, the second transition etc. These are ways of describing our current predicaments that both collapse and define social certainties, some better than others. I think fictions and certainties kind of run in circuits, complicated loops, they all need each other, but they can be short-circuited and collapsed.

 

Untitled, Johannesburg, 2012

Untitled, Johannesburg, 2012

Writing the city, Johannesburg, 2013

Writing the city, Johannesburg, 2013

 

Through distorting archival notions of memory, reprogramming mythologies and fragmenting superstitions – how do you endeavour to map a history, write a present and trace a future?

 

By collecting every bit of data that has ever existed, writing an algorithm to recombine the data in different arrangements, and projecting simulations of these combinations in real time. With or without a computer.

 

I think the future, the present and the past are really the same thing. The conceptual distinction is about trying to extract new perspectives on a problem. In this way superstition, archive, mythology, the academy, memory and prediction are all means to grapple with and articulate a present-crisis.

 

Land:Transitions is a textual mural consisting of about 30 000 written words and a performance intervention examining the historical, symbolic and personal meaning of South African land. What sort of research did you conduct in order to create this work, and what were your findings?

 

I spent a month researching the recorded history of conflicts over land in South Africa. I determined a rough timeline and collected as many academic papers, books, articles on the period as I could (academically referenceable material). I then looked for other works related to land, conflict and dispossession, these included poems, political manifestos, oral histories, letters, reports, songs, lists etc. I also found basic geological history of the formation of the physical earth that constitutes South Africa.

 

The work was not about presenting findings, in the sense of a conclusive report, but rather presenting the entirety of my research without narrative, as a fragmented collection of everything I could find, the intention was to allow people to explore the texts through the inconclusivity and contradiction of the various sources, and to suggest, within the overload of information, the sense that there is still information always-missing, the silenced voices which haunt any sense of South African landscape.

 

Land:Transitions

Land:Transitions

 

 

Using manipulated found cardboard and crates, you created a site specific art installation at the Ussher Fort (a slave fort and colonial prison in Accra, Ghana) called Memory and Speculation. Tell us more about this work, and the aspect of collaboration it entailed.

 

This work was about coming to terms with Accra, a city that for me, holds a mystical-mythical status as the capital of the first free sub-Saharan African nation. As a prototype of anti-colonial triumph and colonial revenge. But Accra is also a real place, with a real lived history and a real lived present. So the work was about trying to hold these two divergent aspects together. Like a dream and a waking.

 

The work was made for Chale Wote, a festival in Jamestown, Accra. The installation was abandoned during the opening with 6 pieces of white chalk placed on a black table in the entrance. There were no instructions to guide, encourage or prohibit visitors. During the open period visitors added their own texts and marks, consisting of various drawings, names and scratches.

 

Memory and Speculation

Memory and Speculation

 

At the end of the day the installation was basically destroyed, the collage was ripped off the walls and lying on the floor, things were in general disarray with chalk scratches of lovers names, swear words, drawings of penises and guns on the wall. But ultimately that was the nature of the work, the idealised/imaginary politically sacred Accra meeting the everyday energy of a working city.

 

The resultant work was then presented as collaborative composition of disparate voices, unreliable perspectives and incompatible notions of archival and historical space. I made a video afterwards to try process the experience.

 

 

You’re also engaged in an ongoing collaboration with performance art ensemble The Brother Moves On which, so far, has consisted of live installations, performances, illustrations, an album cover as well as poster and conceptual design. Specifically looking at the album cover for A New Myth, how did you go about visually interpreting their music?

 

The work was an elaboration on an idea we had come up with for the ETA ep. ETA was a triple faced cosmonaut waiting for the arrival, of what? The work was always a move to escape the mining, city/rural narrative of Mr Gold (an important earlier character in The Brother Moves On canon). A New Myth was trying to expand on the image of the man from outside this space, waiting. The album itself is a kind of moving on, I see it, musically, as folding different places into itself, like a telephone switchboard, or a taxi rank. So in the imagery I had this idea of a map of the universe, the known heavens, as essential to finding new coordinates, the dissolution of masculinity (The Brother) the doubling and tripling of aspects, trying to find/create/assert a new place to address, be addressed and address from.

 

The Brother Moves On, A New Myth

The Brother Moves On, A New Myth

The Brother Moves On, ETA ep

The Brother Moves On, ETA ep

The Brother Burns the Bullion

The Brother Burns the Bullion

 

This year you were part of the Goodman Gallery’s annual group show, [Working Title] 2014. What new works of yours were exhibited?

 

Two working drawings and a site mural looking at fire as a minor character in the drama of (South) African history. This is part of a larger programme of research into civil burnings and tracing this fire in the creative/destructive process of always-becoming (South) African.

 

The Affluent Luxury of Forgetting

The Affluent Luxury of Forgetting

Territory Sans Memoir

Territory Sans Memoir

Some historical notes on the keeping of fire

Some historical notes on the keeping of fire

Some historical notes on the keeping of fire (detail)

Some historical notes on the keeping of fire (detail)

 

What are you currently looking at, reading, watching and/or listening to?

 

Looking at: www.tabitarezaire.com / www.pacestationlive.nasa.gov / www.thepublicarchive.com

Reading: Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood and Trouble on Triton by Sam R. Delaney.

Watching: 28Up South Africa and Salo by Pier Paolo Pasolini.

Listening to: Tricky by Blowback, King Krule’s 6 Feet Beneath the Moon and Neo Hlasko.

 

And finally, where to from here?

 

Attending corner loving, some research at the Wits Palaeontology Archive, thinking about fire. Refusing Afro-futurism.

 

www.nolanoswalddennis.withtank.com

 

The post Featured: Nolan Oswald Dennis | Mapping a history, writing a present and tracing a future appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Jessica Hunkin <![CDATA[#NowPlaying: ‘Boogie’, a Halloween playlist by Amber Smith]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90722 2014-10-30T10:03:33Z 2014-10-30T10:00:40Z

Illustrator and artist Amber Smith is putting the BOO in Boogie with a Halloween-themed #NowPlaying, and it's terrifyingly good.

The post #NowPlaying: ‘Boogie’, a Halloween playlist by Amber Smith appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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#NowPlaying: 'Boogie' by Amber Smith

 

What a treat! Illustrator and designer Amber Smith is putting the BOO in Boogie with a Halloween-themed #NowPlaying today, and it’s terrifyingly good.

 

Her playlist includes the classic I Put A Spell On You by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, The Black Keys’ Howlin’ For You, Bloodshake by Peace, My Body’s a Zombie For You by Dead Man’s Bones (the rock duo of Ryan Gosling and Zach Shields, if you’re into that sorta thing) and it ends on a high note with Le Tigre’s I’m So Excited.

 

For more from Amber find her on Behance, Twitter and Instagram.

Also, check out some work from her latest illustration show Back to the Future.

 

Boogie by Amber Smith from between10and5 on 8tracks Radio.

 

#NowPlaying: 'Boogie' by Amber Smith

 

More #NowPlaying:

10and5.com/series/nowplaying
8tracks.com/between10and5

 

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Stephan Steyn http://www.socialcontract.co.za <![CDATA[Social Contract’s Poster Picks // October]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90728 2014-10-30T08:55:23Z 2014-10-30T08:42:42Z

Here's your monthly poster fix! Enjoy the work and keep going to gigs.

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Social Contract splash logo

 

Here’s your monthly poster fix!

 

It really is a pity we don’t see as many new poster designers around as we would love to, but we can be sure of the fact that posters still have their place in the music scene. As long as bands and DJs keep playing, venues keep supporting the industry and you guys keep going to the gigs supporting the artists we will have bright and beautiful work to exhibit.

 

This month we feature posters by Ben Rausch, Adam Hill, Simeon van den Bergh, Simon Berndt, Chris Slabber, Justin Poulter, Ian Jepson, Cam Lofstrand, Dustin van Wyk and RiBot, Bruno Morphet and BadeNoir.

 

Enjoy the work and keep going to gigs.

 

Posters curated by Social Contract. Follow us @Social_Contract

 

Ben Rausch for Johnny Foreigner (Tour)

Ben Rausch for Johnny Foreigner (Tour)

Adam Hill for Coal at Straight No Chaser

Adam Hill for Coal at Straight No Chaser

Simeon Van Den Bergh for The Ballistics and The Coast

Simeon Van Den Bergh for The Ballistics and The Coast

Simon Berndt for Short & Sweet Music Video Awards

Simon Berndt for Short & Sweet Music Video Awards

Chris Slabber for We Set Sail

Chris Slabber for We Set Sail

Justin Poulter for The Assembly

Justin Poulter for The Assembly

Ian Jepson for The Dyna Jets and The Gumbo Ya-Ya's

Ian Jepson for The Dyna Jets and The Gumbo Ya-Ya’s

Cam Lofstrand for Summer of Noise

Cam Lofstrand for Summer of Noise

Dustin Van Wyk and RiBot for GaryThomas

Dustin Van Wyk and RiBot for GaryThomas

Bruno Morphet for ToyToy October

Bruno Morphet for ToyToy October

BadeNoir for Prime Circle

BadeNoir for Prime Circle

 

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Melissa van Rooyen <![CDATA[Out of Office: Molten Toffee]]> http://10and5.com/?p=90681 2014-10-30T08:25:45Z 2014-10-30T08:25:45Z

Molten Toffee is the newest coffee spot on Kloof Street owned and run by Robbi Gorelick and Cian van der Vyver, and your newest office away from the office.

The post Out of Office: Molten Toffee appeared first on Between 10 and 5.

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Molten Toffee

 

Even though they only opened last week, a feature on Molten Toffee is long overdue. The newest addition to Kloof Street’s coffee strip is owned and run by Robbi Gorelick and Cian van der Vyver, who worked together at another spot just up the road when they decided to spread their wings and open their very own coffee shop. The name Molten Toffee is borrowed from the Cockney rhyming slang meaning ‘coffee’ and yes (we know you’re wondering) they do have toffee and yes they will add the toffee to your coffee. It’s a beautiful, welcoming and intimate space – which is exactly what they were aiming for. Robbi and Cian say the idea has always been for this to be part office and part home, a permanent third hangout space for their customers. Leon Morland designed the look and feel of the space and the branding and identity was done by Christina Labuschagne. The brass counter, the lampshades, the square tables and the button stool are by Tim Church from Church Original Products. Also acting as a gallery of sorts, artworks by Windows.03 (Black Koki x Ello Xray Eyez x Jean de Wet) are currently on display and for sale.

 

Molten Toffee serves Deluxe coffee, fresh juices and a variety of fresh pastries; check the deli fridge and the blackboard to see what the flavour of the day is. They may or may not expand their menu and they may or may not open a bar, so watch this space.

 

Find them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and stop by at 45b Kloof Street, Cape Town from Monday to Saturday, 9am – 5pm.

 

Molten Toffee

Molten Toffee

Molten Toffee

Molten Toffee

Molten Toffee

Molten Toffee

 

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