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On 25 January, Goodman Gallery Johannesburg opens Bôna, a selection of work from several photo essays by the late Thabiso Sekgala which explore how social borders determine visibility in society....

Nyasaland Analysand is Samson Kambalu's second solo exhibition with Goodman Gallery. For this exhibition Kambalu draws on his Malawian upbringing surrounded by syncretic cultures to produce work that celebrates and interrogates the practice of integrating Western influences into local traditions and customs. Dance in the Wood...

No-Romance No Romance, an exhibition featuring the individual works of Ghada Amer, Reza Farkhondeh and collaborative work by the two artists, is currently on at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg. The two huge international names met in art school in Nice in 1988. They both moved to New York in 1996 where they established studios in Harlem. The collaborative works between Amer and Farkhondeh started in the early 2000s. Their collaborative process involves passing the drawings back and forth until each artist is creatively satisfied. The show at Goodman Gallery presents a sampling of several series that the two artists have developed since 2005, including three large new works on paper. Women and nature are the themes of their collaborations. About Ghada Amer: Amer was born in Cairo, Egypt. She graduated from Villa Arson in Nice, France with an MFA in painting in 1989. For over 20 years Amer has been producing works that are profoundly linked to an aesthetic language specific to women. She chooses needle and thread as her medium to question the classifications of sexuality, beauty, gender and domesticity. About Reza Farkhondeh: He was born in Iran and graduated with an MFA in video/short film from Villa Arson in 1991. For 20 years Farkhondeh has been developing videos, short films and paintings that deal with lyrical expression within the context of ever-changing cultural differences between Western and Middle Eastern civilisations. The show runs until 9 April. UPDATE: For the Capetonians, two pieces by Amer and Farkhondeh are currently up at the South African National Gallery in Company Gardens
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